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Thank you Terry and thank you Janet! I printed it, saved it, put it everywhere. Past time for me to make the chage. Keep in touch! Let me know how it works for you too.

Sounds right on target..

The article, that is.  Maybe someone sensed that I was running out of patience...my situation as previously described hasn't repeated.  Please let us know how you do with using this new knowledge.

Hey  Dear. there is so much of you in the story, isure do hope that you learn soon how to say no before all the work kills you it's not worth it. Hugs

Fantastic article!

 

I MUST absorb this. These days, my life depends on the change

 

http://www.mint.com/blog/how-to/the-power-of-no-at-work/

 

Patti Dear. i know it's hard to say no, but i have said yes to things that i really didn't want to do but soon i learned to say no i can't do that or no i don't feel good about doing it or no right now i just have to much to do. you need time for Patti also. Love you Dear

Thank you Terry!

Thanks so much Janet!

Peppermint.....

for many of us, it's the hardest word of all to learn.  I know that this is a group about language, but just wanted to respond to your comment, since it's always been a hard one for me, and being "nice" and saying "yes" to everything has landed me.....well, not in hot water, but in uncomfortable situations.

 

I was discussing this with a friend last night, as a person from the night shift,

delayed prep on a patient until my shift, and the person who should have been responsible to prepare the patient when they were called declined to do so.  As is my usual modus operandi, I just shouldered the responsibility and got it done, putting myself behind in the process and therefore giving less time to my patients overall.  Just to add insult to injury, the night nurses were all sitting around talking when I came on shift.

 

This story is background for my discussion with my friend.  Obviously, once I had time to think about it, I was angry - not just for this incident, but because this kind of thing happens regularly.  Was it unfair to me? Yes.  Was it even more unfair to my other patients? Absolutely.  The problem was how to address the situation.  Getting mad would have made me the bad guy.  My friend, who is a psych nurse educator, suggested that I could have said something like: "Please help me to understand why you are uncomfortable with the dose.  Have you tried looking it up to see if it's within the normal range?"

 

My guess is that it takes time to learn how to address this kind of thing.  I am planning to change my approach at work and to get there earlier to deal with this sort of thing, as well as checking for things that have been left undone on the previous shift. I tried discussing it with a supervisor without naming names, and she just wanted me to tell someone in management.  In my experience, that generally just gets you labeled as a troublemaker without solving problems.  I'll post here next time this sort of situation comes up and tell you how it goes.

Honey all you need to do is just start using it after awhile it won't be hard to say.

Abasakur (Papua New Guinea) Oya
Abenaki (Maine USA, Montreal Canada) Nda
Abenaki (Maine USA, Montreal Canada) Ôda
Abun (Indonesia) Nde
Acateco (San Miguel Acatlán Guatemala) K'amaj
Acateco (San Miguel Acatlán Guatemala) C'am
Achí (Baja Verapaz Guatemala) N...taj
Achuar (Ecuador) Tsaa
Adyghe (Middle East) Haw
Adyghe (Middle East) Hawaa
Afar (Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti) Maley
Afrikaans (Southern Africa) Nee
Afrikaans (Southern Africa) Geen
Agua Caliente (California USA) Gai
Aguaruna (Peru) Atsá
Aguateco (Huehuetenango Guatemala) Ci
[Akan, see Asante and Fante]
Akha (Thailand) Mah nguh
Aklanon (Philippines) Indi
Alabamu (Texas USA) Ánkobi
Albanian (Albania, Yugoslavia) Jo
Alsacian (Alsace France) Ne
Altai (Russia) Jok
Alyawarr (Australia) Arangkwa
Alyawarr (Australia) -iyanga
Amharic (Ethiopia) Yelem
Amharic (Ethiopia) Aydelem
Amharic (Ethiopia) Aye
Amharic (Ethiopia) Ie
Ami (Australia) Way
Amis (Taiwan) Cuwa
Amuzgo (Oaxaca & Guerrero Mexico) Ti
Anindilyakwa (Australia) Nari
[Anishinaabe, see Ojibwe]
Anglo-Saxon (England) Na
Apache (Arizona USA) Dah
Apabhramsha (India) Ma
Apuchikwar (India) Poyeda
Arabic (Middle East, North Africa) Lay
Arabic (Middle East, North Africa) Laa
Arabic (Middle East, North Africa) La
Arabic (North Africa) Lela
[Arawak, see Taino]
Arberesh (Hora e Arbereshevet Italy) Jo
Arberesh (Sicily Italy) Jo
Ariti (Brazil) Maiçá
Armenian (Armenia, Russia, Middle East) Voch
Armenian [Eastern] (Armenia) Che
Aromunian (Greece, Balkans) Nu
Asante (Ghana) Daabí
Ashkun (Afghanistan) Ma
Assyrian (Iran, Iraq, Syria) La
Asturian (Spain) Non
Asturian (Spain) Nun
Atayal (Taiwan) Iyat
Ateso (Uganda) Mam
Auca (Ecuador) Ba
Auca (Ecuador) Wín
[Aukan, see Ndjuka]
Awa (Papua New Guinea) Ahq áho
Awa (Papua New Guinea) Aqa
Awakabal (Australia) Keawai
Aymará (Bolivia, Peru, Chile) Janiwa
Aymará (Bolivia, Peru, Chile) Janiw
Aymará (Bolivia, Peru, Chile) Jani
Aymará (Bolivia, Peru, Chile) Janixay
Aymará (Bolivia, Peru, Chile) Janixä
Ayticha Yokuts (California USA) Gatu
Azerbaijani (Azerbaijan, Iran) Yox
[Azeri, see Azerbaijani]
[Aztec, see Náhuatl]

Bagandji (Australia) Gila
Bagesu (Central Africa) Sinalubiri
Bagesu (Central Africa) Ah ah
Bakitara (Central Africa) Nangwa
Balochi (Pakistan) Enna
Bambara (Mali) Ayi
Bandjalang (Australia) Yagam
Bandjalang (Australia) Yugam
[Bangla, see Bengali]
Bankalachi (USA) Hais
Basabei (Central Africa) Katai
Basabei (Central Africa) Kutai
[Basa Sunda, see Sundanese]
Bashkir (Russia) Yok
Basque (France, Spain) Ez
Batak (Indonesia, Sumatra, Philippines) Daong
[Bavarian, see German (Bavaria)]
Belorussian (Belarus) Ne
Belorussian (B
Saying NO

For SO many reason, I MUST get better with this word. Maybe if I say it many languages, it will sink in