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Ghost Towns
6 years ago
LOST HORSE MINE




Lost Horse Mine Courtesy Karl Kasarda


NAME: Lost Horse Mine COUNTY: Riverside ROADS: 2WD GRID: 1 CLIMATE: Hot summer, cold winter w/ perhaps snow BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime
Hot summer

This site rrecieved its name because in 1893 "Dutch Frank" Diebold, Ed Holland, and Alfred G. Tingman were camped in the area and had their horses stolen. The horses were found the next day at the camp of the ruthless McHaney gang, by Diebold. These armed bandits told Diebold, "You did not lose any horses." However, Diebold once again tried to describe them when he was cut short by McHaney, this time in a more ominous tone:"Remember, you didn't lose no horses." Diebold replied, "No, I guess I didn't" He then, while walking back to camp, discovered a rich gold vein. He sold his claim, the Lost Horse, to salonkeeper near Twentynine Palms Oasis Johnny Lang, for $1000. Eventually Jep Ryan, from Banning, bought out Holland and Tingman. Ryan suspected his new partner, Lang, of mischeif when he came to notice a bizzare patern in his operations:the size of the amalgam ball from his day-shift operations was consistently larger than Lang's night-shift efforts. Subsequently, Ryan had a man watch Lang, who indeed was highgrading his own mine. Lang, confronted with the evidence, was forced to selll out for $12,000. Lang, however continued small prospecting and lived out in the hills. In January 1925 a note was found attached to his shack saying, "Gone for grub." Several months later, his nearly mummified remains were found;close by were a square inch of bacon and atrace of flour. Johhny Lang, age 73, was wrapped in canvas and buried at the site of his death.(Info. aqquired from Southern California's Best Ghost Towns by Phillip Varney) Submitted by: Nicholas Walrath

     Please stay tuned for the next installment.....
6 years ago



Lost Horse Mine Courtesy Karl Kasarda


To Whom It May Concern, This concerns the Lost Horse Mine at Joshua Tree National Park, Twenty Nine Palms, California.

The author of the article incorrectly stated that " Dutch Frank" Diebold, Ed Holland, and Alfred G. Tingman were camped in the area of the Lost Horse Mine and lost their horses. This is incorrect. It was in fast Johny Lang that lost his horse and went in search of the lost animal. He stopped by the McHaney encampment near Keys' Desert Queen Ranch and discovered that his horse had been "confiscated" by the McHaney's.

6 years ago
The part where Diebold comes in is where the McHaney's directed Lang to his camp. This is where Diebold told Lang that he had discovered a large gold strike. He had not been able to claim it because of interference from the McHaneys. Lang purchased the claim from Diebold for $1,000. Lang took on partners with enough clout to take on the McHaneys. Lang's partners eventually sold their shares to the Ryan Brothers.
6 years ago

Also, after Johnny Lang had been discovered skimming some amalgam from the night shift that he was supervising. He was given the option of selling his share or going to jail. He sold for $12,000.

It looks like the information that was published was obtained from a publication entitled: "Southern California's Best Ghost Towns", by Phillip Varney. The information was not correct.

6 years ago

I have been a frequent visitor to Joshua Tree National Park for more that two (2) decades and have become very familiar with the legends, myths and stories that have become Joshua Tree National Park.

Thank you, Chris Vallely


http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/ca/losthorsemine.html

     Please stay tuned for the next Ghost Town.
6 years ago
LLANO DEL RIO

NAME: Llano Del Rio
COUNTY: Los Angeles
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(see map): 3
CLIMATE: Hot summer, cool winter.
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Almost anytime... hot in Summer. COMMENTS:About 20 miles east of Palmdale on S.R. 138.
REMAINS:
Rock walls of about a dozen structures.
6 years ago
Llano Del Rio was started as a socialist project by Job Harriman in 1913. By 1914 there were about 500 residents in this utopian commune. By 1917, there were water supply problems and there was friction amongst the residents and by 1918, most people had left and Harriman lost Llano Del Rio to bankruptcy. Today ruins are still spread out just off State Route 138 east of Palmdale.



Llano Del Rio
Courtesy Kristen Allsbrook
6 years ago

Llano Del Rio
Courtesy Kristen Allsbrook
6 years ago


Llano Del Rio
Courtesy Kristen Allsbrook

6 years ago


Llano Del Rio
Courtesy Kristen Allsbrook

6 years ago


Llano Del Rio
Courtesy Kristen Allsbrook

ELDORADOVILLE

NAME: Eldoradoville
COUNTY: Los Angeles
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 1
CLIMATE: Mostly so.Cal warm
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Can be warm in the summer COMMENTS: From the 10fwy. N. on Asuza Ave. which turns into San Gabriel Canyon Rd. Roughly 20 miles. A scenic drive on paved roads.
REMAINS: Only some foundations
6 years ago
Eldoradoville was a mining community during the heyday of the hydraulic gold extraction in the San Gabriel canyon. Was washed away by a flood in the early 1900's. Locals tell a story of a miner and mule taken by the same flood along with several sacks of gold. There is a rumor of a safe being washed away as well. Niether the miner, his mule nor the safe were ever seen again. The town was never rebuilt. there are several abandoned mines in the area. After a strenuous 4 or 5 hour hike up the canyon you can see the "Bridge to nowhere" A highway bridge across the canyon abandoned after construction that was never connected with any road.

Submitted by: Ian Evans
6 years ago
BERDOO CAMP

NAME: Berdoo Camp
COUNTY: Riverside
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(see map): 4
CLIMATE: Mild winter and hot summer
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Anytime COMMENTS: North of Indio.
REMAINS: A few foundations and crumbling buildings.
6 years ago
Berdoo Camp was founded not for mining, but for water. When California built the Colorado River aqueduct to bring water to Los Angeles, many camps were erected along the way, Berdoo being one of the largest. Berdoo was founded in the early 1930's and abandoned in 1937. The town was paid for by the Metropolitan water district and men and their families who worked on the water project lived here. Today there are a few concrete foundations left and partial structures left.
6 years ago


Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field


Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field

6 years ago


Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field

6 years ago

Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field
where is this?
6 years ago

it looks like an interesting site to go explore! ;]

~sarie

6 years ago

     Sarie,

     It is in Riverside County in California.



This post was modified from its original form on 24 Feb, 5:00
6 years ago


Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field

ok
6 years ago

ok cool

6 years ago


Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field

6 years ago

Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field
6 years ago


Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field

6 years ago



Berdoo Camp
Courtesy Karl Kasarda, Bill Field
6 years ago


Admin Building Remains
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Admin Building Steps
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Admin Building Steps
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Cistern for camp water
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Berdoo Camp December 06
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Foundation remains looking toward Palm Springs - and the smog
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Hospital
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Walls
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Remaining foundations
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago

Watch out for the morons with shotguns!
Courtesy Bill Cook

http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/ca/berdoocamp.html
6 years ago
CLARAVIlle

NAME: Claraville
COUNTY: Kern
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(see map):
3
CLIMATE: Cool winter with snow and warm summer
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Summer, fall, spring. COMMENTS: Near Inyokern.
REMAINS: All of the buildings have been removed.
6 years ago
BAGDAD

NAME: Bagdad
COUNTY: San Bernardino
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 1
CLIMATE: HOT, in a desert
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime COMMENTS: No residents. Get on Old Route 66 from I-40 and go 20 miles south. Bagdad is 20 miles west of Cadiz, 75 miles SE of Barstow, and Newberry Springs is 75 miles NW of Bagdad.
REMAINS: A "BAGDAD" sign, cemetery, some broken glass, a tree, desert shrubs, and building foundations are all that remain of this once thriving desert town.
6 years ago
Once very thriving, having the only dance ballroom for miles around and the legendary Bagdad Cafe, the last buildings were demolished in 1991. Submitted by: Mark Pippin


Bagdad Cafe 4-7-05
Courtesy Lynn Helbing

6 years ago

Bagdad Cafe 4-7-05
Courtesy Lynn Helbing
6 years ago


Bagdad Cafe 4-7-05
Courtesy Lynn Helbing

6 years ago


Bagdad Motel
Courtesy Lynn Helbing


http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/ca/bagdad.html
6 years ago
ORCHARD CAMP

NAME: Orchard Camp
COUNTY: Los Angeles
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 1
CLIMATE: Hot in summer. Like L.A. in winter
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Non-fire season. Fire closure in summer.

COMMENTS: No residents.In Angeles Nat'l Forest.3.5 miles up Mt. Wilson Trail from trail head in Sierra Madre.First Water is about 1/2 there, but trail is easy and shaded beyond.Camp is across stream from steep climb to Mt. Wilson.
REMAINS: Some stone retaining walls. Fragments of foundations.
6 years ago
Rollicking waystation on Mt. Wilson Trail from turn of the century until the floods of late 1920's. Depression prevented any rebuilding.Floods of late 1970's finsihed it off. Submitted by: Jay Preston


Orchard Camp
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


6 years ago


Orchard Camp
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn

6 years ago


Orchard Camp
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn

6 years ago


Orchard Camp
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn

6 years ago


Orchard Camp
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn

6 years ago


Orchard Camp
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn

6 years ago
ATWELL MILL and

MINERAL KING

NAME: Atwell Mill and Mineral King
COUNTY: Tulare
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(see map):
3
CLIMATE: Cool winter with snow and warm summer
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Summer, fall, spring. COMMENTS: In Sequoia Kings National Park. Preservation efforts are underway at Mineral King.
REMAINS: Some mill machinery, some cabins at Mineral King. A camp ground at Atwell Mill.
6 years ago
Atwood Mill and Mineral King were lumber and mining towns. Atwood Mill was named after a mill of the same name. Unfortunately, Atwood Mill's location left much to be desired and it was constantly threatened by avalanches. Eventually, the town succombed to one and was no more.
6 years ago
BELLEVILLE

NAME: Belleville
COUNTY: San Bernadino
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(see map): 4
CLIMATE: Snow in the Winter. Warm in the Summer.
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Late Spring through late Fall COMMENTS: Belleville is located about 8 miles North of Big Bear Lake City in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California. This area is now a National Forest. Parts from the movie Paint Your Wagons were film at this location. Several foundations still remain, a large Juniper tree that was the hanging tree is still there. Everytime that there was a hanging the hanging branch was cut off, so there are many branches missing from this tree. The saloon still remains as well as much mining equipment and some graves.
REMAINS: Saloon, Mining Equipment, Hanging Tree, Mines, Foundations.
6 years ago
Gold was discovered in Holcomb Valley in 1860 by William F. Holcomb who was born in Indiana in 1831. As prospectors rush to this area in 1860 the town of Belleville was established. The town was named after the Blacksmith's baby daughter, Belle, who was the first child born there. The Blacksmith whos name was Van Duzen also built the first road into this area for $1500.00. The towns population grew to about 1500. Belleville lost an election in September of 1861 by two votes to the City of San Barnardino as to where the county seat of San Bernardino County would be located. It is estimated that miners were taking out as much as 50 onces of gold per week. Most of it came through placer workings. As the gold ran out the people left and by 1880 there were only a handful of residents left. After 1880's the valley returned to it's natural state, and Belleville became a Ghost Town. Submitted by Gary R. Salisbury.
6 years ago
UPDATE: I live up in Big Bear Lake, which is in the very near vicinity of Belleville. I would advise all who are considering visiting the site of Belleville to not get your hopes up. All you will be able to see are two graves (plus one I found in a field near the IS ranch building), the remains of the cabin which are minimal (a homeless person set a fire inside it quite a while back, and accidentally burned it down), and about 7 mine shafts, and a small piece of mining machinery here and there; nothing fancy or large. I don't know why a saloon is mentioned as being there. The only building still standing is a simple cabin that was brought over from the IS ranch. About the most interesting thing to find in it are all the less-than-generous people who have carved their names into the wood. Also, the hanging tree is not the original. The one in the photo may have been, but the original tree was struck by lightening at least 5 years back. The mountains have not been kind to the town. It had many rather large buildings at one time, and I believe our local paper said that a hotel existed into the 1930's. If you go to the local public library, and look for the "Bearly Remembered" column in the Grizzly Gazzete, you can learn more about the town. One more thing. If you still want to find the town, and ask a local, just say the remains out in Holcomb Valley. If you say Belleville, half of them probably won't know what you're talking about. However, if you want to see some beautiful scenery, then by all means come. It is a great area for hiking, and biking, but always be aware of Bears, and Cougars, and most of all, Rattlesnakes. The mountains are beautiful all year round, and you will see that there are many streams in the area that still hold a fair amount of gold. Be forewarned though, there are a lot of people who still live in that area that are rather touchy about people snooping around their claim. If you see a no trespassing sign, regard it as "This property guarded by Smith & Wesson". Grant Houston
6 years ago

When a victim of a hanging was finally cut down, the branch from which the rope hung was chopped off. So you can tell how many men have been hung from this tree.
Courtesy Dolores Steele
6 years ago

Arrastras
Courtesy Dolores Steele
6 years ago


Ross was killed while operating a saw and was buried on the spot. Someone took the time to hand carve the old picket fence around the grave.
Courtesy Dolores Steele

6 years ago

Ruins of the Pigmy Cabin - the cabin was very small - stories were that it was made small because a bad storm was fast approaching or maybe builder was eager to finish and try his luck in the nearest stream.
Courtesy Dolores Steele
6 years ago

Mitzger Mine
Courtesy Dolores Stee
6 years ago
EAGLE MOUNTAIN
NAME: Eagle Mountain
COUNTY: Riverside
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(see map): 4
CLIMATE: Hot summer, mild winter.
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Almost anytime... hot in Summer. COMMENTS: This was an iron ore mine of kaiser steel. Patton trained troops for desert warfare www2.
REMAINS:
Houses and mine.
6 years ago

I believe it was created 1940"s ended in the 1980"s. at end had 4,000 residents. I don't believe any now. I am trying to find information regarding history of town. Visit the Eagle Mountain Refuge Website.

Submitted by: vicki camp

Update: Dear sirs: the Eagle Mountain Ghost Town has been revived. not for the mine but for a privately run jail. It is run by Eagle Mt correctional, a private jail co. The buildings were cheap and it is close to a high security prision so that bad inmates can be transfered to the state of calif, sincerly Peter Barrett.

6 years ago
Update: To whom it may concern, I used to work on an ambulance in Blythe, Ca. and responded to Eagle Mountain several times on emergency calls. Eagle Mountain is very much a ghost town with rows of mostly empty houses and abandoned schools and stores. There is also a laundry mat that is still standing. The roads are all paved, but no care is taken to repair them. Unlike most ghost towns, Eagle Mountain still has a firehouse that is staffed. Riverside County #80. It is staffed with two firefighters for both structural and wildland fires. The reason that it is still staffed is because there is now a private prison there. The population is approx. 200 from what I remember. Some of the correctional officers live in Eagle Mountain, inhabiting a few of the homes that have been left behind. When driving thru the town, an occasional green lawn can be seen. All of the mining equipment is still in place and not much has changed from the picture posted. Seeing that it is located north of I-10 by about 8 miles in the desert doesn't make it an appealing place to visit espesially in the summer. I wish that I knew more about the history of the Kaiser Mines, Desert Center, and Lake Tamarisk (all of which are located in the immediate area). I do believe that Eagle Mountain was deserted in the mid 80's and the prison was built in the late 80's or early 90's. There isn't really much of a night life, but it does make for some great modern day ghosttowning. Sincerely, Aaron Hall
6 years ago
I grew up in Eagle Mtn. Calif while the mine was in full operation. My dad was a drill leadman at the mine. I was born in Indio in 1960 & lived in Eagle Mtn. until I moved in 1976. I still have family living there, just outside of Eagle Mtn. I have pics of the mine and the town at a time when everything was going in full swing. I also have pics after it closed and turned into a ghost town. There are still people there, not necessarily those who worked at the mine but some who came back when the prison opened. There is a block or two that has residents now, and the school operates with approx. 75 students from K-6 grade. The entire town has a fence surrounding it and you have to have permission to go in. Our house is still there although the majority of houses were split in 1/2, put on trucks and sold. Even the larger trees were uprooted and sold. L. Halsey
6 years ago

I wanted to let you know that I visited Eagle Mountain in full swing during it's heyday as a young kid. I stayed there several weekends and even an entire week. The heat left you little choice but to stay indoors. At night, bats used to fly about and our friends had an easy time catching tortoises. An Ice Cream Truck used to roam the streets during the day, passing the house several times, playing Elvis music. I remember there wasn't a lot to do in town. We would go to the store and return. Our friend suffered an accident one time in the mine. While investigating a mud chute problem, it busted open burying our friend alive in mud. He would miraculously survive as the only thing that didn't get buried was his nose. He had amnesia for a week, shook it off, went back to work. He had survived several mine collapses by luck, having a day off etc. I remember riding in the station wagon to take him to work, the mine seeming to be big and overwhelming. Having little to do, our friends sought out other places to visit nearby. We got to see these too. It was demonstrated how digging a hole produced water, drinkable water and that we did. As our friends were of the Mormon faith, there was a mormon church near the Desert Center freeway offramp or thereabouts. I wonder what became of it. It was a small building but, did have a half court basketball facility in it and served for other recreational purposes. I heard a ghost story about the building. During a Halloween party, there was a prop dummy set up near the restroom. It was said that a spirit entered into the dummy and it became animated at times as people went to use the restrooms. The party was over. The music was shut off and the members left, scared. A few Elders remained behind to excise the spirit which they did, though I heard it was difficult to do. Even the Elders were terrified of the moving prop dummy. We were taken to a place in the desert where a mirage would perform everytime. It appeared as a big blue lake. Our friends knew exactly where to drive to get the desired effect. There were sand dunes, white, clean, very hidden. While our friends knew where they were, I kept asking were they might be. It still looked like desert to me. However, coming over a small hill, we were floored. This place was beautiful and appeared to be right out of the movies. We observed motorcycle riders, racing up and down the dunes. Our friends knew many of them to be Kaiser employees. Off a beaten dirt road, south of the desert center exit, there was a dirt road. We were told it was a Kaiser picnic area that was no longer maintained. I remember my friends debating whether or not to take a 2WD on a very bad road. We went. As the station wagon rolled along, a noticed many scorpions on the ground as I gazed out the window. They slowed the car to a stop and pointed out a bicycle rim high atop two poles on a large pile of boulders. They called it Wheelers Rock. It could only be seen at a certain angle and you had to know what to look for. The climb was for the very skilled. Stopping again, we got out and walked a for a little, coming up on Indian writings on the rocks and boulders. I cannot remember the locations of any of these places. The road improved as we went along. We got to the picnic area. The tables were metal, there were metal sheets covering the five or six tables and it was great to be in the shade again. Our friend began reading the signs of the desert floor. Bobcat footpaths were identified and there were a lot of them. A sidewinder path was spotted. We were to picnic there, go out for a hike to see even more Indian heiroglyphs. Our friends worked on finding the trail of which they did. However, some rattlers liked a big brushy bush and shhok their tails for all they had near the trail. I joined my fellow siblings in the plea not to go. The bats were starting to fly as we packed it in for the day. There was a concern of getting out while the sun still offered light, lest our trip became difficult. I searched for the Bicycle rim of Wheeler Rock and got a three second glance. Twenty years later, there are still signs at the begining of the dirt road south of Desert Center but, the road looks forgotten and very untravelled. There are treasure troves out there of Indian life, and modern life. I wonder what the picnic area looks like now. I have a lot of great memories of this area. As life gets in your way, it becomes difficult to research and remember these places. However, there are ruins out there, modern and old. I am surprised to hear a town I actually used to visit is a ghost town. Ken Hay

6 years ago


Eagle Mountain - Kaiser Steele Mine
Courtesy Eagle Mountain Refuge Website

6 years ago


Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda

6 years ago


Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda

6 years ago


Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda

6 years ago

Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda
6 years ago

Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda
6 years ago

Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda
6 years ago


Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda

6 years ago


Eagle Mountain
Courtesy Karl Kasarda

6 years ago
ZURICH

NAME: Zurich
COUNTY: Inyo
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 3
CLIMATE: Cool windy winters, hot summers
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Spring, fall COMMENTS: Located on the just to the east of the Owens River on the east side of the Owens Valley about 5 miles east of the town of Big Pine.
REMAINS: Foundations from several buildings are the only remnants still existing today.
6 years ago
Zurich was the first town south of Laws, CA on the ex-Carson & Colorado narrow gauge railroad (later the Southern Pacific Railroad narrow gauge Owens Valley Branch), which originally run from Mound House, NV to Keeler, CA . After standard gauging of the northern section to Mina, NV and abandonment of the line over Montgomery
Pass only the line from Laws, CA to Keeler remained (finally abandoned in 1960). Town Died when the rails were pulled up from Tonopah, Nv to Keeler, CA. Named by the residents because the sharp jagged peaks of the White Mountains, located just east of the town and the Sierras to the west looked like the Alps in winter when covered by snow. The last resident was a family who's daughter Josephine (the last person born in Zurich) married a railroad conductor and moved to Mojave, CA. Now 74 in 2000, She still resides in Mojave today. Submitted by: Bill Steele
6 years ago


Zurich's historical plaque located on California Highway 168. December 5, 1998.
Courtesy David A. Wright
Great Basin Research
6 years ago

Stock yard at Zurich. This platform appears to be a scale for weighing livestock. December 5, 1998.
Courtesy David A. Wright
Great Basin Research
6 years ago

Zurich Station on the former narrow gauge Carson & Colorado Railroad. December 3, 1998.
Courtesy David A. Wright
Great Basin Research
6 years ago

My truck is parked on the foundation of the depot, giving an indication of its size. December 5, 1998.
Courtesy David A. Wright
Great Basin Research
6 years ago


View of the north end of the foundation. December 5, 1998.
Courtesy David A. Wright
Great Basin Research

6 years ago


Zurich Station
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Zurich Station
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Zurich Station
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Zurich Station
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Zurich Station
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Zurich Station Demolished
Courtesy Bill Cook

6 years ago


Zurich Station Marker
Courtesy Bill Cook


     Please stay tuned for Ghost Towns Part Two.....

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