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HANGMAN GAME # 169
2 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!


SINCE WE ALWAYS HAVE NEW MEMBERS - HERE ARE THE RULES - YOU CAN ONLY GUESS 1X BEFORE NYACK COMES BACK WITH THE ANSWERS AS TO WHICH LETTERS ARE CORRECT.


HOWEVER IF YOU REALLY THINK YOU KNOW THE ANSWER - YOU CAN GUESS - BUT PLEASE DON'T GUESS UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY SURE - IT MESSES THINGS UP IF YOU GUESS PART OF IT AND NOT ALL OF IT - THEN I NEVER KNEW WHAT LETTERS TO TAKE OFF ETC. HOPE THAT MAKES SENSE!

2 years ago

_ _ _ _- _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

T please.

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

T

 

 

_ _ _ _- T _ _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Good Morning ~ How about an "A" Please

2 years ago

 Marilyn!

 

Letters Guessed

 

T, A

 

 

 

 

_ _ _ _- T A _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

L please.

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

 

T, A, L

 

 

 

 

 

 

_ _ _ _- T A _ L _ _    L _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Hi !

I please

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

 

T, A, L, B, I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

_ I _ _- T A I L _ _     L _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

C,D,E,F,G,H,J,K,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

May I have a "D" please

2 years ago

Sorry didn't fee "D" was already taken.

 

 

An "F" please

Anonymous
2 years ago

Ring-Tailed Lemur.

Marilynn where are you?

2 years ago

Brenda, I think you are right. You are really good at this game!

2 years ago

CONGRATULATIONS, BRENDA!

 

 

37

Ban Lemurs as Pets in the United States! TAKE ACTION!
Ban Lemurs as Pets in the United States! TAKE ACTION!

Animals (tags: lemurs, pets, legal, exotic pets, AnimalCruelty, AnimalWelfare, conservation, cruelty, environment, wildlife, protection, pets )

Lindsey
- 9 hours ago - thepetitionsite.com
Illegal logging fueled by the "rosewood mafia"and mining in Madagascar's tropical rainforest is pushing the critically endangered lemur to the brink of extinction. Lemurs are being poached as food, and captured and sold in the exotic pet trade.
hot!!! | add comment | demote?: duplicate bad link spam not worthy

 

     

2 years ago

          ring-tailed-lemur-2.jpg

 

 

          8133046.jpg

 

Ring-Tailed_Lemurs.jpg

 

 

Ring-tailed Lemur

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring-tailed_lemur

 

 

The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families. It is the only member of the Lemur genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar. Known locally in Malagasy as maky (spelled maki in French) or hira, it inhabits gallery forests to spiny scrub in the southern regions of the island. It is omnivorous and the most terrestrial of lemurs. The animal is diurnal, being active exclusively in daylight hours.

The ring-tailed lemur is highly social, living in groups of up to 30 individuals. It is also female dominant, a trait common among lemurs. To keep warm and reaffirm social bonds, groups will huddle together. The ring-tailed lemur will also sunbathe, sitting upright facing its underside, with its thinner white fur towards the sun. Like other lemurs, this species relies strongly on its sense of smell and marks its territory with scent glands. The males perform a unique scent marking behavior called spur marking and will participate in stink fights by impregnating their tail with their scent and wafting it at opponents.

As one of the most vocal primates, the ring-tailed lemur utilizes numerous vocalizations including group cohesion and alarm calls. Experiments have shown that the ring-tailed lemur, despite the lack of a large brain (relative to simiiform primates), can organize sequences, understand basic arithmetic operations and preferentially select tools based on functional qualities.

Despite being listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN Red List and suffering from habitat destruction, the ring-tailed lemur reproduces readily in captivity and is the most populous lemur in zoos worldwide, numbering more than 2000 individuals. It typically lives 16 to 19 years in the wild and 27 years in captivity.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thank you Nicole and Nyack.

Signed.......great pictures, Lemurs are so cute!

2 years ago

The genus name Lemur was created by Carl Linnaeus, the founder of modern binomial nomenclature, to describe only three species, but the word eventually became the collective name used for all primates endemic to Madagascar. Linnaeus was familiar with the historical works of Virgil and Ovid and their references to the festival of Lemuria, during which specters or ghosts—referred to as lemures—were exorcised. As an analogy to these ghosts from Roman mythology, he created the name "Lemur" to include these prosimian primates due to their nocturnal habits and ghost-like appearance. Their noiseless movements at night, reflective eyes, and ghostly cries may also have been a factor. It is even possible that Linnaeus knew that some Malagasy people have held legends that lemurs are the souls of their ancestors.

 

The species name, catta, refers to the ring-tailed lemur's cat-like appearance. Its purring vocalization is similar to that of the domestic cat

2 years ago

Arent they adorable, Brenda? I could see why someone might want one, there is something very cat-like about them! They are sooo critally endangered in the wild tho.

2 years ago

BEHAVIOR-

 

DIET

The ring-tailed lemur is an opportunistic omnivore primarily eating fruits and leaves, particularly those of the tamarind tree (Tamarindus indica), known natively as kily. When available, tamarind makes up as much as 50% of the diet, especially during the dry, winter season. The ring-tailed lemur eats from as many as three dozen different plant species, and its diet includes

flowers, herbs, bark and sap. It has been observed eating decayed wood, earth, spider webs, insect cocoons, arthropods (spiders, caterpillars, cicadas and grasshoppers) and small vertebrates (birds and chameleons).During the dry season it becomes increasingly opportunistic.

 

SOCIAL SYSTEMS

Troops are classified as multi-male groups, with a matriline as the core group. As with most lemurs, females socially dominate males in all circumstances, including feeding priority. Dominance is enforced by lunging, chasing, cuffing, grabbing and biting. Young females do not always inherit their mother's rank and young males leave the troop between three and five years of age. Both sexes have separate dominance hierarchies; females have a distinct hierarchy while male rank is correlated with age. Each troop has one to three central, high-ranking adult males who interact with females more than other group males and lead the troop procession with high-ranking females. Recently transferred males, old males or young adult males that have not yet left their natal group are often lower ranking. Staying at the periphery of the group they tend to be marginalized from group activity.

 

For males, social structure changes can be seasonal. During the six month period between December and May a few males immigrate between groups. Established males transfer every 3.5 years, although young males may transfer every 1.4 years. Group fission occurs when groups get too large and resources become scarce.

 

In the mornings the ring-tailed lemur sunbathes to warm itself. It faces the sun sitting in what is frequently described as a "sun-worshipping" posture or Lotus position. However, it sits with its legs extended outward, not cross-legged, and will often support itself on nearby branches. Sunning is often a group activity, particularly during the cold mornings. At night, troops will split into sleeping parties huddling closely together to keep warm.

 

Despite being quadrupedal the ring-tailed lemur can rear up and balance on its hind legs, usually for aggressive displays. When threatened the ring-tailed lemur may jump in the air and strike out with its short nails and sharp upper canine teeth in a behaviour termed jump fighting. This is extremely rare outside of the breeding season when tensions are high and competition for mates is intense. Other aggressive behaviours include a threat-stare, used to intimidate or start a fight, and a submissive gesture known as pulled-back lips.

 

Border disputes with rival troops occur occasionally and it is the dominant female's responsibility to defend the troop's home range. Agonistic encounters include staring, lunging approaches and occasional physical aggression, and conclude with troop members retreating toward the center of the home range

 

2 years ago

CONSERVATION STATUS

In addition to being listed as Near Threatened in 2008 by the IUCN, the ring-tailed lemur has been listed since 1977 by CITES under Appendix I, which makes trade of wild-caught specimens illegal. Although there are more endangered species of lemur, the ring-tailed lemur is considered a flagship species due to its recognizability.

 

Three factors threaten ring-tailed lemurs. First and foremost is habitat destruction. Starting nearly 2,000 years ago with the introduction of humans to the island, forests have been cleared to produce pasture and agricultural land. Extraction of hardwoods for fuel and lumber, as well mining and overgrazing, have also taken their toll. Today, it is estimated that 90% of Madagascar's original forest cover has been lost. Rising populations have created even greater demand in the southwest portion of the island for fuel wood, charcoal, and lumber. Fires from the clearing of grasslands, as well as slash-and-burn agriculture destroy forests. Another threat to the species is harvesting either for food (bush meat) or pets. Finally, periodic drought common to southern Madagascar can impact populations already in decline.

 

In 1991 and 1992, for example, a severe drought caused an abnormally high morality rate among infants and females at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve. Two years later, the population had declined by 31% and took nearly four years to start to recover.

 

The ring-tailed lemur resides in several protected areas within its range, each offering varying levels of protection. At the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, a holistic approach to in-situ conservation has been taken. Not only does field research and resource management involve international students and local people (including school children), livestock management is used at the peripheral zones of the reserve and ecotourism benefits the local people.

 

Outside of its diminishing habitat and other threats, the ring-tailed lemur reproduces readily and has fared well in captivity. For this reason, along with its popularity, it has become the most populous lemur in zoos worldwide, with more than 2500 in captivity as of 2009. It is also the most common of all captive primates. Ex situ facilities actively involved in the conservation of the ring-tailed lemur include the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, NC, the Lemur Conservation Foundation in Myakka City, FL and the Madagascar Fauna Group headquartered at the Saint Louis Zoo. Due to the high success of captive breeding, reintroduction is a possibility if wild populations were to crash. Although experimental releases have met success on St. Catherines Island in Georgia, demonstrating that captive lemurs can readily adapt to their environment and exhibit a full range of natural behaviors, captive release is not currently being considered.

 

Ring-tailed lemur populations can also benefit from drought intervention, due to the availability of watering troughs and introduced fruit trees, as seen at the Berenty Private Reserve in southern Madagascar. However, these interventions are not always seen favorably, since natural population fluctuations are not permitted. The species is thought to have evolved its high fecundity due to its harsh environment; therefore, interfering with this natural cycle could significantly impact the gene pool.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Nyack I think it so wrong that animals are kept has pets, yes they are adorable but most people have no idea how to look after them. ( forgot to put wild in front of animals although I have to say some people dont't know how to look after domesticated pets either)!

2 years ago

They ought to ban ALL exotic pets animals as pets. It only encourges them to be captured from the wild and leads to endangerment. I think they have to place a ban on them one at a time, tho.

 

Did you know there are more tigers in captivity and privately owned in the United States, than all the wild tigers in the world combined?

Anonymous
2 years ago

I agree about a ban Nyack.

No I didn't know about the tigers, it is a shame that this is so.

2 years ago

I meant all exotic animals.....I just woke up! I need to put on a pot of coffee lol

2 years ago

CONGRATS BRENDA!!!!!!   That's OK - didn't realize the mistake - now I ned more cofee, - Signed - and thanks for all the info - you are doing great - cute animals though.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Val.

2 years ago

Congrats Brenda !!!

 

Thanks Nyack !!!

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Sa F.

Congratulations Brenda!!!!
2 years ago

Wow,  Brenda, you sure were quick there.   Sorry, haven't been here, not feeling to well this morning. 

These are such adorable animals ~ Thank you Nyack!!!

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Marilynn......missed you, hope your ok now!

2 years ago

Congrats Brenda Noted and already signed Nyack ) )

2 years ago

Congratulations once again, Brenda dear. You're so good at this game! I signed the petition, read all the information and saved some of the pictures. Lemurs are so adorable with their kitty-like looks that you just want to cuddle them, but they are wild animals and shouldn't be treated as pets. Thank you, Nyack.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Barbara and Lynn!