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Falklands War: UK and Argentina mark invasion 30 years on
2 years ago

Falklands War: UK and Argentina mark invasion 30 years on

Argentine conscripts in Port Stanley in April 1982
Argentinian conscripts buying souvenir postcards in Port Stanley post office after the invasion
Related Thread

Services are being held in Britain and Argentina to mark the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War.

 

Some 255 British and 650 Argentine troops died after the UK sent a task force to the islands in response to Argentina's invasion on 2 April 1982.

 

The anniversary comes amid renewed tension, as Argentina has reasserted its claim to the archipelago.

 

The UK's prime minister has suggested the day is used to remember both the Argentine and British dead.

 

In a statement, David Cameron has also said that he remains committed to upholding British sovereignty over the islands.

 

Britain has controlled the Falklands since 1833 but Argentina claims the territory - which it calls the Malvinas - saying it inherited its rights to them from Spain.


Eternal flame

 

British veterans of the war - and relatives of those who died - will pay their respects at Britain's National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

 

There a single candle will be lit as a gesture to mark the anniversary.

 

In his statement, Mr Cameron said: "30 years ago today the people of the Falkland Islands suffered an act of aggression that sought to rob them of their freedom and their way of life.

 

"Today is a day for commemoration and reflection: a day to remember all those who lost their lives in the conflict - the members of our armed forces, as well as the Argentinian personnel who died."

 

Mr Cameron saluted the "heroism" of the soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines who took part in the operation which freed the islanders from Argentine rule.

 

He said "We are rightly proud of the role Britain played in righting a profound wrong. And the people of the Falkland Islands can be justly proud of the prosperous and secure future they have built for their islands since 1982.

 

"Britain remains staunchly committed to upholding the right of the Falkland Islanders, and of the Falkland Islanders alone, to determine their own future.

 

"That was the fundamental principle that was at stake 30 years ago: and that is the principle which we solemnly reaffirm today."

 

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner is expected to visit the southern port of Ushuaia on Monday, to remember the Argentine troops that died.

 

President Fernandez is expected to lead rallies to commemorate the Argentine dead and light an eternal flame.

 

Prior to her arrival, Argentine veterans held a vigil for the fallen.

Falklands War veteran Cesar Ozan salutes during a ceremony on the eve of the 30th anniversary of the war, in Ushuaia.
Falklands War veteran Cesar Ozan was among those who gathered for a vigil in Ushuaia

British Falklands War veteran Simon Weston, who was badly injured when his ship the Sir Galahad was attacked, told the BBC he did not believe the Argentina's military capability was as strong a threat as it was at the time of the initial conflict.

 

Page 1         http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17580449

2 years ago

He added he felt Britain's stance at the time was the right one, adding: "I always believe that people's independence, people's freedom, people's right to self-determination is always worth defending. You've only got to go the islands and meet the islanders and understand what it means to them."

 

Argentine veteran Alejandro Meringer said he felt he "lost his youth" because of the war. He said he experienced great joy when he was told by an officer he would be helping to "recover Las Islas Malvinas" but this was replaced by sadness when their mission was unsuccessful.

 

Argentina has asked for negotiations about sovereignty but the British government says it will not discuss the issue without the agreement of the islanders.

 

London has accused Buenos Aires of trying to impose an economic blockade on the islanders, after it banned Falklands-flagged ships from docking in its ports, as well as those of other countries which are members of the Mercosur trading block.

 

Argentina has complained about what it calls British "militarisation" in the south Atlantic, after it was announced one of the Royal Navy's newest warships was to be deployed to the region.

 

BBC World affairs editor John Simpson said while a new armed conflict remains unlikely, Argentina was now using diplomatic weapons to push its claim over the Falklands.

 

The defeat of the Argentine forces led directly to the collapse of the military dictatorship led by Gen Leopoldo Galtieri, who was later jailed in Buenos Aires for "incompetence" during the war.

 

The British prime minister at the time was Margaret Thatcher but she is not expected to play a part in the commemoration of the 30th anniversary due to ill-health.

 

Abandoned Argentine helmets

 


The Falklands War

 

2 April: Argentine forces invade Falkland Islands. Other British South Atlantic territories including South Georgia are seized shortly afterwards

5 April: A British task force of more than 100 ships sets sail for the South Atlantic

25 April: South Georgia is recaptured by British forces.

2 May: Argentine cruiser General Belgrano sunk by HMS Conqueror, killing more than 320

21 May: Three thousand British troops begin landing at San Carlos on East Falkland

28-29 May: British forces recapture Goose Green.

8 June: British landing craft are bombed at Fitzroy, killing more than 50 men

13 June: Argentine positions on mountains overlooking the capital Port Stanley are taken

14 June: Argentine forces surrender. British troops march into Stanley

255 British servicemen and three Falklands civilians died during the conflict. The number of Argentine dead is estimated at about 650

 

The Falklands War: Timeline

 

What are your memories of the Falklands War? Were you or any members of your family involved in the conflict? You can send your comments to the BBC using the form below:

 

Page 2       http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17580449

 

Simon Weston: Falklands were worth defending
2 years ago

Simon Weston: Falklands were worth defending      (video)

 

2 April 2012 Last updated at 08:08 Help

In June 1982, Britain's Falklands campaign suffered a disaster when the landing craft RFA Sir Galahad and RFA Sir Tristram were bombed, killing more than 50 and injuring 150 men.

 

Simon Weston was a Welsh Guard on board the Sir Galahad and suffered terrible injuries.

 

On the 30th anniversary of the Argentine invasion, he told the BBC "I always believe... people's right to self-determination is worth defending.

 

"You've only got to go to the Islands and meet the islanders and understand what it means for them."

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17581925



This post was modified from its original form on 02 Apr, 1:44
Anglesey Falklands veteran's war memories 30 years on
2 years ago

Anglesey Falklands veteran's war memories 30 years on

BBC Wales is marking the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War with a series of special reports.

 

The Argentineans invaded the Falklands at the start of April 1982, one day later they landed on the neighbouring island of South Georgia.

 

There to meet them were 21 Royal Marines led by a young lieutenant from Anglesey.

 

Despite having orders not to do anything that could lead to loss of life, Keith Mills and his men fought a five-hour gun battle.

 

Roger Pinney reports.

 

Video    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-17568833

Falklands invasion is remembered in UK and Argentina
2 years ago

Falklands invasion is remembered in UK and Argentina

2 April 2012 Last updated at 06:26 Help

On 2 April 1982, Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands, which it calls the Malvinas. The UK responded by sending a taskforce to regain the Falklands.

 

More than 250 British and 649 Argentine troops died. Meanwhile President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner is to address a rally of supporters of their country's claim to sovereignty of the islands.

 

John Simpson reports from Ushuaia, from where some of the Argentine fleet set sail.

 

Video       http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17580877

Falkland islanders' views 30 years after invasion
2 years ago

Falkland islanders' views 30 years after invasion

Help

Argentina and the UK are marking the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War.

 

The BBC's Alan Little reports on the views of Falkland islanders on the likely threat of a future invasion by Argentina.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17581181

What lies behind Falklands tensions?
2 years ago

What lies behind Falklands tensions?

BBC Radio 4 Interview 

 

Thirty years ago, Argentine naval forces invaded the Falkland Islands, starting a 10-week war with Britain for control of the territory.

 

Argentina's president, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, has in recent months stepped up a diplomatic battle with London, reasserting Argentine claims to sovereignty over the Malvinas, as they are called in Argentina.

 

Her government has threatened to sue companies looking for oil off the Falklands and it has won some degree of support from other countries in the region.

 

World affairs editor, John Simpson, reports from the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires.

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_9710000/9710400.stm

Argentine papers mark anniversary of Falklands War
2 years ago

2 April 2012 Last updated at 14:48

 


Argentine papers mark anniversary of Falklands War

Argentine veterans of the Falklands War pose in front of the Malvinas Monument in Ushuaia, Argentina
Argentine veterans marked the anniversary at the Malvinas Monument in Ushuaia

Newspapers in Argentina mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War with editorials portraying the islands as a live and unifying force. Several condemn the military government of the time for its ''bungled attempt'' to seize the islands by military means, but say the country should still press its claim to the 'Malvinas', as they call the territory.

 

Some commentators call on politicians to treat the issue of the islands as a state policy and not a tool in their political battles.

 

Editorial in La Voz

Regardless of differences in social and economic status, race and beliefs, the issue of the Malvinas is a flag that encompasses and unites the whole country.

 

Osvaldo Pepe in Clarin

Malvinas is a symbol of our unity, our most ambitious fantasy of the construction of an integrated nation… Malvinas is that motto which draws us together, provides us with our identity.

 

Fulvio Pompeo in Clarin

Sovereignty (of the islands) and peace appear to be a pivotal axis of the issue that is dearest to national feelings. Various governments, that have shaped the destiny of our country since the return to democracy, have addressed the policy towards the Malvinas in different ways, but beyond nuances they all agreed on the reaffirmation of these guiding principles.


Editorial in La Nacion

There is no doubt that the legitimate right of Argentina to the archipelago taken by force by the British in 1833 served as an instrument in a desperate attempt by the military government to address their declining support… It was a costly lesson. It lost us time and land… Thirty years after this military conflict we should not forget the heroes who gave their lives for their country and prevent the abuse of the Malvinas issue for political gains.

 

Editorial in El Dia

An inalienable right of our country became an excuse for a bungled war launched by a military government whose true aim was to remain in power… We paid for this absurd war with the blood of our men and long years of isolation and international mistrust towards our country… Thirty years after that painful and traumatic experience, Argentina should intensify its work and dedication to seek to regain, through diplomatic channels and in all international forums, the full recognition of our sovereignty over the Malvinas.

 

Editorial in La Voz

Argentina has committed diplomatic and military errors in order to recover the islands. Because of this it is necessary to implement a serious state policy in a permanent and irrevocable form… The definition of such a strategy needs to be adopted as a state policy and not a military adventure, as in 1982, nor a partisan policy that seems to be behind the recent actions by the government of Cristina Fernandez. Our society wants no more spasmodic actions or demagoguery… The Malvinas must never again become a subject of a military adventure, or oscillating diplomatic attempts.

 

Fulvio Pompeo in Clarin

In order to develop and design a strategy for the Malvinas issue, we need to promote and consolidate a true state policy that prioritises long term planning and provides clear proof of continuity in the management of our external affairs… External dialogue and internal consensus seem to be the keywords and are crucial to address the future of the Malvinas.

 

BBC Monitoring selects and translates news from radio, television, press, news agencies and the internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages. It is based in Caversham, UK, and has several bureaux abroad.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17584749



This post was modified from its original form on 02 Apr, 10:40
Welsh Guard's film shows Falklands War scenes
2 years ago

2 April 2012 Last updated at 15:34

 

Welsh Guard's film shows Falklands War scenes

The bombing of the Sir Galahad caused the biggest loss of British forces in the conflict

A Welsh Guard has shared film footage taken during the Falklands War for broadcast for the first time since the conflict began 30 years ago.

 

Tracy Evans from Blaenau Ffestiniog captured scenes of the Sir Galahad vessel on fire following an attack by Argentine forces which left 48 dead.

 

A total of 32 Welsh Guards died, and as many more were injured.

 

The footage has been unearthed as the 30th anniversary of the conflict is marked in Britain and Argentina.

 

Mr Evans, who now lives in Australia, told BBC Wales he took his cine camera and as much film as he could carry with him when he was sent to the South Atlantic in 1982.

 

"I thought this would be an ideal opportunity because it was the first time we'd been to war, an operation on tour.

 

"I thought it would be a unique thing. I stocked myself up with as much film as I could carry."

 

As well as the hit on the Sir Galahad, the film includes footage taken before and after the battle of Mount Harriet, where Welsh Guards played a key role in taking an Argentine strongpoint blocking the route to the capital, Port Stanley.

 

Will Roberts from Llandudno, Conwy, was involved in that battle and found himself trapped in a minefield.

 

"The only way out of it was prod and find them. Eventually after hours they cleared a path so we could get out of it. The order was simply follow the man's footsteps in front of you," he said.

 

Shortly afterwards the Argentines went into retreat.

 

Mr Evans explained: "Word came in that a white flag had been seen over Port Stanley.

 

"After confirmation came though, I took my camera out and there's a small scene there where the Welsh Guards are jubilant at what took place."

 

Mr Roberts said: "We heard about a possible ceasefire. On reaching the top of Sapper Hill we took up the higher ground and it was confirmed, and the war was over as such.

 

"I suffered severe nightmares, sweats. To this day my average sleep pattern is four hours sleep."

 

However he added: "I'm proud to say I served in the Welsh Guards. A lot of good men went down there.

 

"Would I do it again? I don't see why not. I was in the Army and the call came."

 

For John and Gary Griffiths, the attack on the Sir Galahad was to cost them their father, Guardsman Gareth Griffiths.

 

Gary Griffiths said: "The closer I've got to dad's age when he went down, the more I've thought about it.

 

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This post was modified from its original form on 02 Apr, 21:00
2 years ago

"When I was very young I didn't give it much thought because I didn't know what had gone on. But as I got to my late teens, early 20s, I started to think, 'who was he'?"

 

John Griffiths described his father as a proud family man, who loved rugby and "loved the Welsh Guards and battalion as well".

 

"I always remember listening on the news and seeing the ship on fire and I was always conscious it was quite a few days after the ship was hit that we heard dad was missing," he said.

 

"After we got the news there was a lot of emotion going on. My mum coped very very well with it all going on, with my nan and my aunty and all the family around her."

 

Mr Griffiths has visited the memorial to the Welsh Guards at Fitzroy above Bluff Cove where the Sir Galahad was hit.

 

"That was my first part of me really laying lots of ghosts to rest; paying my respects to dad.

 

"It was having that final conversation with dad and saying goodbye. That was one thing that hurt me when I was younger - that I didn't get a chance to do that."

 

Page 2    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-17585248

Falkland war veterans remember battle for Mount Longdon
2 years ago

Falkland war veterans remember battle for Mount Longdon

Veterans of the Falklands conflict have remembered fallen comrades at a service to mark the 30th anniversary since the islands were invaded.

Memorial services are also being held in Argentina.

 

Two veterans told BBC Radio 5 live's Shelagh Fogarty about their experience of the Mount Longdon battle. Denzil Connick was 25 years old and in the third battalion of the British Parachute Regiment, while Argentinian Miguel Savage was sent to the Falklands as part of the invasion when he was 19-years-old and ten days away from finishing his army service.

 

To listen to other Radio 5 live interviews, please visit the Best Bits page.

 

VIDEO           http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17588596

Cristina Fernandez: 'Colonial enclaves are an injustice'
2 years ago

Cristina Fernandez: 'Colonial enclaves are an injustice'

2 April 2012 Last updated at 18:44 Help

 

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez has described the UK's control over the Falkland Islands as unjust.

 

Services have been held in both Britain and Argentina to mark the 30th anniversary of the start of the war.

 

The Argentine president made a speech at the southern port of Ushuaia, where crowds gathered to remember the Argentine servicemen who died.

 

She said: "It is an injustice that in the 21st Century there are still colonial enclaves".

 

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has said that he remains committed to upholding British sovereignty over the islands.


Video    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17589301

 

Falklands: Denzil Connick, Lord West and Bob Fox recall conflict
2 years ago

Falklands: Denzil Connick, Lord West and Bob Fox recall conflict

Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands without warning on 2 April 1982.

 

For the next 10 weeks the Falkland's 1,800-strong community found themselves the focus of the world's attention.

 

BBC Radio Wales brought together three men who each played key roles in the conflict: L/Cpl Denzil Connick of the 3rd Battalion Parachute Regiment; Admiral Lord Alan West was commander of HMS Ardent and Bob Fox was a BBC task force correspondent.

 

Radio  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-17582918

Falklands 30th anniversary: Simon Weston rules out further conflict
2 years ago

Falklands 30th anniversary: Simon Weston rules out further conflict

2 April 2012 Last updated at 20:29 Help

 

Veterans of the Falklands war and the families of those who died have been marking the 30th anniversary of the Argentinian invasion of the islands in the South Atlantic.

 

Simon Weston survived the bombing of the Sir Galahad troop ship which killed many of his fellow Welsh Guards in 1982.

 

He says the islanders have history on their side in their wish to remain British, and the Argentinians will never dare invade again.

 

He spoke to Jamie Owen about the day's commemorations.


Video     http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-17592335

Falklands War: UK and Argentina mark invasion 30 years on
2 years ago

Falklands War: UK and Argentina mark invasion 30 years on

Families and veterans have gathered for services to mark the conflict

Argentina's president has described the UK's control over the Falkland Islands as unjust, as services are held in both Britain and Argentina to mark the 30th anniversary of the start of the war.

 

Cristina Fernandez described the UK's stance as "absurd", but urged peace.

 

UK PM David Cameron said the day should remember the dead from both countries.

 

A total of 255 British servicemen and about 650 Argentines died after the UK sent a task force following the Argentine invasion on 2 April 1982.

 

In a statement, Mr Cameron also said that he remained committed to upholding British sovereignty over the islands.

 

Meanwhile, the Royal Navy has confirmed one of its newest warships, HMS Dauntless, will leave the UK on Wednesday for a six-month routine deployment in the South Atlantic.

 

Britain has controlled the Falklands since 1833 but Argentina claims the territory - which it calls the Malvinas - saying it inherited rights to them from Spain.

 

Day for reflection

British veterans of the war - and relatives of those who died - paid their respects at Britain's National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

President Fernandez: "It is an injustice that in the 21st Century there are still colonial enclaves"

 

A single candle was lit as a gesture to mark the anniversary. It will remain alight for 74 days - the length of the conflict.

 

Anglican priest the Rev Vic Van Den Bergh told the service they had come together to pray for peace between the UK and Argentina and to remember the fallen - including the three Falkland Islanders who died in the conflict.

 

In his statement, Mr Cameron said: "Thirty years ago today the people of the Falkland Islands suffered an act of aggression that sought to rob them of their freedom and their way of life.

 

"Today is a day for commemoration and reflection: a day to remember all those who lost their lives in the conflict - the members of our armed forces, as well as the Argentinian personnel who died."

 

Mr Cameron saluted the "heroism" of the soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines who took part in the operation which freed the islanders from Argentine rule and said the UK played a role in "righting a profound wrong".

 

He said: "Britain remains staunchly committed to upholding the right of the Falkland Islanders, and of the Falkland Islanders alone, to determine their own future.

 

"That was the fundamental principle that was at stake 30 years ago: and that is the principle which we solemnly reaffirm today."

 

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gave a speech at the southern port of Ushuaia, where crowds gathered to remember the Argentine servicemen who died.

 

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2 years ago

The president paid tribute to the "hundreds who came to fight here, to this territory, to the islands, and to the hundreds who laid down their lives".


'Usurping environment'

 

She attacked the UK government's stance on the Falkland Islands, saying: "Every day that goes by it looks more ridiculous, more absurd to the eyes of the world."

 

President Kirchner went on: "It is an injustice that in the 21st Century there are still colonial enclaves... 16 colonial enclaves throughout the world - 10 of those belonging to the United Kingdom." She added: "We also demand that so they stop usurping our environment, our natural resources, our oil."

 

But she said that "wars only bring backwardness and hatred" and said the government supported peace.

 

The president said she had written to the International Red Cross to urge the UK to "take necessary measures" to identify unknown soldiers from both countries who are buried in the Falkland Islands.

Argentinian ceremony in Ushuaia
Argentines pay their respects at a memorial in the port of Ushuaia

Before she arrived in Ushuaia, about 5,000 people, including Argentine veterans, held a vigil for the fallen. Army veteran Carlos Alberto Latorre said he saw himself as one of the "Malvinas combatants" and it was important for him to be there to educate Argentines about what happened during the conflict, Reuters reported.

 

He said he could see younger generations also believed Argentina had a rightful claim to the islands, and this gave him the strength to continue. Meanwhile, members of left-wing political group Quebracho burning a union jack and an effigy of Prince William, who was deployed to the territory in March, during a demonstration near the British embassy in Buenos Aires.

 

British Falklands War veteran Simon Weston, who was badly injured when his ship Sir Galahad was attacked, told the BBC he did not believe that Argentina's military capability was as strong a threat as it was at the time of the initial conflict.

 

Richard Jones, whose son Craig was the last soldier to be killed in the conflict, said those who lived on the islands identified themselves as British.

 

"They're not Latin American, they've got nothing really in common with the Argentines. They are as British stock as we or anybody else. They want to remain - they don't want to be part of Argentina, and that was what the war was all about," he said.

 

Argentina has asked for negotiations about sovereignty, but the British government says it will not discuss the issue without the agreement of the islanders.

 

Foreign Office Minister Jeremy Browne said although the relationship with Argentina "was somewhat fraught", the UK was not entirely friendless in Latin America, while Defence Secretary Phillip Hammond said the UK had "the assets, people and equipment" in place to robustly defend the Falkland Islands.

 

In a statement, shadow defence secretary Jim Murphy said there was no evidence the Falkland Islanders wished to change their nationality and added: "Something more important than the Empire's legacy was and is at stake: the universal right to self-determination and our belief that diplomatic dispute should be resolved by democracy rather than the uptake of arms."

 

London has accused Buenos Aires of trying to impose an economic blockade on the islanders, after it banned Falklands-flagged ships from docking in its ports, as well as those of other countries which are members of the Mercosur trading block. On Monday Downing Street also dismissed Argentina's threat to take legal action against companies involved in oil exploration in the islands.

 

The prime minister's official spokesman said: "We are a big investor in that country. We think they are acting against their interests if people are attacking shops and branches of banks in Argentina."

 

Argentina has complained about what it calls British "militarisation" in the south Atlantic. BBC world affairs editor John Simpson said while a new armed conflict remained unlikely, Argentina was now using diplomatic weapons to push its claim over the Falklands.

 

The defeat of the Argentine forces led directly to the collapse of the military dictatorship led by Gen Leopoldo Galtieri, who was later jailed in Buenos Aires for "incompetence" during the war. The British prime minister at the time was Margaret Thatcher, but she is not expected to play a part in the commemoration of the 30th anniversary because of ill-health.

 

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This post was modified from its original form on 02 Apr, 21:25
At the scene
2 years ago

At the scene

The mood at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire was a sombre one, of remembrance and reflection on the events of 30 years ago that changed so many lives forever.

 

There was no sense of triumphalism, just a quiet acknowledgement that those who were sent to the Falklands as part of the British Taskforce did their duty, and did it well - though many paid the highest price.

 

Thirty years to the day - and almost to the hour after the Falkland Islands surrendered to the Argentinian invaders - Margaret Allen lit a candle in the chapel here, which will burn until June 14th, the day the islands were liberated.

 

Her husband Able Seaman Iain Boldy was killed just two weeks after their wedding. As she lit the candle, she says she thought of his face and the last time they saw each other before he set sail.

 

All here today say they feel that sending the Taskforce was right, and that liberating the Falklands was worth it despite the sacrifices.

 

Many veterans and some of the families have visited the Falklands and spoken to the islanders, while some veterans have also met their former Argentinian foe.

 

In contrast to the sabre-rattling between the two governments, the veterans say they bear no animosity towards those they found themselves fighting in 1982 - just a sympathy and a certain empathy for the young Argentinian men who were also sent to the Falklands all those years ago, and suffered even heavier losses during the 74 day campaign.

 

Page 3         http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17580449

Argentine protesters outside British embassy
2 years ago

Argentine protesters outside British embassy

Masked protesters have torn down a police fence and hurled rocks during a demonstration outside the British embassy in Buenos Aires.

 

Riot police responded with rubber bullets and water cannons.

 

The protest came on the 30th anniversary of Argentina's invasion of the Falkland islands which it claims as the Malvinas.

 

Britain has controlled the Falklands since 1833 but Argentina claims it owns the territory saying it inherited rights to them from Spain.

 

Video        http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17593222

Barack Obama's shameless Falklands betrayal will overshadow David Cameronís Washington visit
2 years ago

 

Barack Obama's shameless Falklands betrayal will overshadow David Cameron’s Washington visit


This post was modified from its original form on 03 Apr, 0:04
2 years ago

The above report is a report that I saved before Cameron Visit to the US, it does make me and a number of other Brits where is the Obama Administration coming from, in relation too their statement 

 

Obama administration’s call for a negotiated settlement between London and Buenos Aires over the Falklands: there is no more to Settle in the British eyes, The settlement was sorted out in 1982 when the Union Jack was raised on the Falklands again.

2 years ago

Unfortunately, Ray, Obama thinks he has the right to tell all our allies what they should or shouldn't do when it is none of his, or the U.S.'s business unless asked for support or their opinion.  His arrogance (narcissism) does not stop with the U.S., look what he has done to Israel; telling the Prime Minister that they have to notify the U.S. before they do a pre-emptive strike against Iran.  Right, that makes sense.  So do we then reciprocate and notify Israel when we are going to do something or do we allow England to tell us what we can or can't do about Mexico?

 

The way we can apologize to our allies is to see that Obama is not re-elected as President in November.  That is the best apology we can make.

HMS Dauntless sets sail for the Falklands
2 years ago

HMS Dauntless sets sail for the Falklands

HMS Dauntless, one of the UK's largest and most powerful air defence destroyers, has set sail for the Falkland Islands.

 

The Ministry of Defence says it is a "pre-planned and routine" six-month deployment in the South Atlantic.

 

However, it comes within days of the 30th anniversary of the start of the war.

 

Steve Humphrey

reports from Portsmouth.

 

 Video http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17609577

 

Read More

 

Falkland Islands: UK bans exports to Argentine military
2 years ago

 

Falkland Islands: UK bans exports to Argentine military

Falkland Islands sign
Three decades after the Falklands War, tensions between the UK and Argentina have resurfaced

All UK exports to Argentina's armed forces are being halted amid continuing tension over the Falkland Islands.

 

The UK government said the move should "ensure no British licensable exports or trade have the potential to be used by Argentina to impose an economic blockade" on the islands.

 

Since 1998, the UK has sold products only that would maintain, rather than enhance, Argentina's military.

 

The trade has been worth more than £3m over the past five years.

 

Argentina claims the Falklands as its own, but the UK has controlled the islands since 1833.

 

The two countries went to war in 1982 over the British overseas territory, and both nations marked the 30th anniversary of the start of the conflict earlier this month.

 

In a written statement to the House of Commons, Business Secretary Vince Cable said the export control policy to Argentina was being tightened up with immediate effect.

 

"The government has reviewed this policy in the light of recent actions by the Argentine government aimed at harming the economic interests of the Falkland islanders," he said.

 

"We are determined to ensure no British licensable exports or trade have the potential to be used by Argentina to impose an economic blockade on the Falkland islanders or inhibit their legitimate rights to develop their own economy."

 

Trade with the Argentine military has been worth an estimated £3.3m over the past five years across 67 licences.

 

 

 

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills said an estimated 25 companies had exported to the Argentine military in this time.

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner marks the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War
Argentina has held a series of events to mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war

There are an estimated 37 outstanding licences, worth about £1m.

Typical exports have been spare parts for plane and boat engines and other materials to maintain existing military capability.

 

The new policy will effectively shut down this trade, with existing and outstanding export licences to be reviewed and cancelled if not in line with the move.

 

Mr Cable added: "In future no licences shall be granted for any military or dual use goods and technology being supplied to military armed users in Argentina, except in exceptional circumstances."

 

Argentina has asked for negotiations about sovereignty of the Falklands - which it calls the Malvinas - but the British government says it will not discuss the issue without the agreement of the islanders.

 

London has accused Buenos Aires of trying to impose an economic blockade on the islanders, after Argentina and other countries in the South American Mercosur trading block banned Falklands-flagged ships from docking in their ports.

 

More recently Argentina has complained to the United Nations about what it calls British "militarisation", after the UK deployed one of its newest Royal Navy destroyers - HMS Dauntless - to the south Atlantic.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17858361




This post was modified from its original form on 27 Apr, 0:54
2 years ago

it starting to look that this could be more of a diplomatic war between the UK and Argentina, than a military conflict, there must be a breaking point at some time in the future however, time will tell in due cause

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