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PEDRO INFANTE April 13, 2005 5:47 PM

Pedro Infante was a singer/actor very loved in Mexico (The Golden Age of Mexican Movies)

LA RAZON DE LA CULPA
[The Reason for Your Mistake
]
DIGITALLY REMASTERED

Golden Age of Mexican Cinema

Starring:
Pedro Infante

Una pelicula del Clasico CineMexicano de la Epoca de Oro. Con Participacion estelar de Pedro Infante que lo ayuda a estableserse como comediante. El amor, el drama y romance, se enruedan en un historia de los retos de la vida. Se afirma una lección universal; Que en el Amor, los errores de la vida se olvida fácilmente.

One of the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema’s all time classics starring renowned Pedro Infante in an career establishing comedic role. Love, drama and romance, intertwine in a classic tale of life’s trials and tribulations. A universal lesson is affirmed; that in love, life’s mistakes are easily forgotten.
MEXICO 1953 103 MINUTES B/W COMEDY
SPANISH LANGUAGE NOT RATED


DVD UPC 658769 510539 CAT# VF5105 $19.95 SRP

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Girl, Repeated April 13, 2005 5:49 PM

Loving Pedro Infante

By Denise Chávez
Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 272 p., $24

image

Loving Pedro Infante, the fourth book from writer Denise Chávez, delivers a sucker punch straight to the ovaries. Chávez opens with a quick left-right combo: an epigram by Federico Garcia Lorca, "Ay, que trabajo me cuesta quererte como te quiero!/Oh, what an effort it is to love you the way I do!" followed by the equally yearning, "In the darkness of El Colon movie theater, larger than life and superimposed on a giant screen, Pedro Infante, the Mexican movie star, stares straight at me with his dark, smoldering eyes." If the "smoldering" doesn’t get the estrogen flowing, just wait a few pages; the Ya-Ya elements emerge in the form of the Saturday night dress-up session that precedes best friends Tere and Irma’s weekly trip to the same old dump of a bar.

Half bildüngsroman, half enduring-power-of-friendship tale, Loving Pedro Infante is of the genre made familiar by Bridget Jones’s Diary and its ilk. Our heroine, Tere Avila, is a slightly booze-soaked, bewildered, thirtysomething singleton with a dead-end job; she has a loving but ambivalent relationship with her mother, bad luck with men and frequently finds solace in Mr. Right Now while searching for Mr. Right. Wrapped up in her affair with a married nogoodnik, Tere fails to notice that her best friend Irma Granados is falling in love with an older man. Over the course of the book, they fight, they make up, they watch Pedro Infante movies together, they watch Pedro Infante movies with the ladies of the Pedro Infante Club de Admiradores Norteamericano #256, they cook, they eat, they go to bars. Then, all of the characters unite for an anticlimactic search for the token gay friend, who has disappeared in a Pedro Infante-related suicide attempt/search for a jilted lover.

It’s pretty standard stuff, really.

Where Chávez shines is in the dead-on descriptive details of everyday life between lifelong best friends. Teresa has a special shelf in Irma’s closet for her pajamas and sleepover pillow, and their menstrual cycles are in synch. Conversations between the two fluctuate from events that happened two days ago to twenty years ago, indiscriminately; each knows the other cold, from sexual history (broad and eclectic) to preference in pasta texture (al dente for Irma, soggy for Tere). These are the small things that mark a relationship with a powerful history. After all, shelf space isn’t for mere acquaintances.

Since Chávez rates so highly for authenticity, it’s a shame that all this ground has been traveled before. The problem is not just the fact that Bridget Jones’s Diary defined the angst-ridden neurotic-oversexed-boozy-single-girl genre; it’s that there are so many books in the genre now, like Melissa Bank’s The Girl’s Guide to Hunting and Fishing, Amy Sohn’s Run Catch Kiss, Sophie Kinsella’s Confessions of a Shopoholic, Jennifer Belle’s Going Down and of course Candace Bushnell’s Sex and the City. It gets a little tedious. The only way in which Chávez’s novel deviates from type is in the setting: her heroines aren’t overeducated white women in major urban centers, they’re culturally aware Mexicanas living in Texas. Yawn. As a minority writer myself, I laud the presence of culturally diverse voices in the literary marketplace. Unfortunately, retelling the same old story with Hispanic heroines speaks more of mainstream acculturation and assimilation than of groundbreaking "other" voices in literature.

Loving Pedro Infante’s most hysterical segment, "Pink Eye," has a decidedly Vagina Monologues bent. In it, Tere leaves her diaphragm in a hotel shower stall, and for 12 pages agonizes about its retrieval:

"Did I leave El Demonio on the nightstand in its Pepto-Bismol-pink plastic case, a peeping flesh-colored eye reverently closed? I had to have left it in its case! There was some dignity to that. The maid would pick it up, without thinking, and throw it in the wastebasket, just another thing forgotten.

"But no. Oh no! I’d left it exposed, oozing and swollen, roñoso, a running sore in the face of life, on the soap dish in the dirty shower stall of the Sands Motel, on the flea-bitten dog-assed side of town behind the tracks. A dripping reminder of my darkest shame."

Chávez’s skillful rendering certainly speaks to the more realistic, practical aspects of coitus. Sure, it’s awkward to dig around in your own uterine canal to retrieve a diaphragm, and contraceptive devices do tend to end up in the damndest places. But then, most birth control humor is funny; like Loving Pedro Infante, that’s nothing new.

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Pedro Infante Movies: April 13, 2005 5:53 PM

    1943

    Arriba las mujeres

     1943
    Director: Carlos Orellana
    Cast: Carlos Orellana; Consuelo Guerrero de Luna; Manuel Noriega; Virginia Zurí; Antonio Badú; Pedro Infante (Chuy); Arturo Soto Rangel (Judge).
    Music: Raúl Lavista
    Photography: José Ortíz Ramos
    Songs: Arriba las mujeres (sung by group of women)
    Time: 92 minutes.

    Plot: Comedy. Uppity feminist (and Socialist!) women learn that their place is in the home and that the man is the boss.

    Infante gets little screen time. He sees his fiance off at the train station and shows up again later to discover she's been corrupted by feminists. (Love wins out in the end, of course). An early sans-moustache Pedro barks like a dog, dances the conga and gets squirted in the face with seltzer. No songs for Infante in this picture.

    A pleasant-enough light comedy despite its non-politically correct theme.

    Also see the film description in Azteca

    Cuando habla el corazón (El Norteño)

    1943
    Director: Juan José Segura
    Cast: Pedro Infante; María Luisa Zea; Víctor Manuel Mendoza; Susana Cora; Fanny Schiller; Arturo Soto Rangel.
    Music: Manuel Esperón
    Songs: Corrido de Chihuahua; Corrido del insulto; Ni sí ni no (El Azotón); La pobre flor; El hombre es un animal; Corrido del norte; Ventanita de Oro.
    Time: 95 minutes.

    Plot: Taking place in Chihuahua, this Mexican Western has norteños, cattle and 10-gallon hats.

    The story begins with 12-year-olds Cruz and Miguel being tested by having to pass a rite of manhood by hunting with only one cartridge. When Miguel slips and misfires, Cruz sacrifices his bullet to his friend. Miguel's little sister, Cecilia, loves the poor and orphaned Cruz and they continue to love each other when grown.

    Miguel (played by Infante as an adult) grows into a womanizer who courts and impregnates Ana María (Cora) without knowing she is the sister of Cruz (Mendoza). She dies leaving behind the child. Cruz discovers the truth as does Miguel.

    This ends up in a duel at the end, with the repeated incident in reverse where Cruz stumbles and misses his mark, and Miguel offers his own bullet. This is rejected by Cruz, who can't shoot his long-time friend. He leaves with Cecilia. 

    El Ametralladora

    1943
    Director: Aurelio Robles Castillo
    Cast: Pedro Infante; Margarita Mora; Angel Garaza; Nohemí Beltrán; Antonio Bravo; Arturo Soto Rangel.
    Music: Armando Rosales
    Songs: Ay, que chispa!; Ruégale a Dios; Corrido del Chaflán.
    Musical Appearances by Los Plateados; Mariachi Vargas; Las Tres Morenas.

    Plot: Billed as a continuation of the hugely successful 1941 film Ay, Jalisco no te rajes! which made Jorge Negrete a charro star. Supposedly takes place in the time of the Mexican Revolution. Infante takes the Negrete lead part of El Ametralladora who is pursued by the same villains who pay two guys to murder one of his friends. Salvador is forced back into a violent life, kills his victimizer, and carries the girl off on his horse.

    This film was directed by the novelist on whose confused novel this film is based. The only picture directed by Robles Castillo, which García Riera calls an inept attempt.

    Mexicanos al grito de guerra (Historia del Himno Nacional)

    1943
    Director: Alvaro Gálvez y Fuentes
    Cast: Pedro Infante (as Lt. Luis Sandoval); Lina Montes; Miguel Inclán (as Benito Juárez); Miguel Arenas; Armando Soto La Marina El Chicote; Arturo Soto Rangel; Angel T. Salas (as Napoleon III).
    Music: Raúl Lavista
    Songs: El Durazno
    Time: 100 minutes

    Plot: Patriotic historical drama. Napoleon III is planning to invade Mexico. In Mexico a contest is held to write the national anthem and is won by a poet and a Catalan musician, encouraged by student Luis (Infante). Luis is courting Ester, the niece of the ambassador of France.

    Juarez and the Liberals assume power and decrees the new anthem played at the barracks. Luis dies in the Battle of Cinco de Mayo while animating the troops by playing the anthem on his bugle.

    Also see film description on Azteca Films


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Viva mi desgracia! April 13, 2005 5:54 PM

1943
Director: Roberto Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante; María Antonieta Pons; Dolores Camarillo; Florencio Castelló; Eduardo Arozamena; Arturo Soto Rangel.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Viva mi desgracia (waltz by Federico A. Cárdenas); Amorcita de mi vida (Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar)
Musical appearances by: Manolita Arriola; Trío Calaveras; Trío Janitzio
Time: 95 minutes.

Plot: Comedía ranchera. In the town of El Infortunio (Misfortune), the young and timid Ramón (Infante) is transformed ala Popeye by a drink, "La animosa" (courage), prepared by his Andaluzian servant Malasombra. This magical drink contains tequila, manzanilla, ron Potrero, ajenjo (absinthe), and anise of the Widowed Tarzan. This is followed by various romantic adventures, brawls, the title song played "ad nauseum," fireworks, and of course Infante getting the girl.

García Riera described this as an "entertaining comedy."

Also see summary and foto from Azteca Films

1944

Escándalo de estrellas

1944
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (Ricardo del Valle y Rosales); Blanquita Amaro (Elena Silveira); Florencio Castelló; Jorge Reyes; Carolina Barret; Eduardo Casado (the father); Sergio Orta; Alfonso Ruiz Gómez; Fanny Schiller (Paloma, the step-mother); Roberto Correll; Pepe Reña.
Music: Manuel Esperón.
Photography: Ross Fisher
Songs: by Eliseo Grenet, Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar.
Sung by Pedro Infante:
Mexicano hasta las cachas (Cortázar/Esperon); No podrás comprender.
Sung by Blanquita Amaro (and written by Eliseo Grenet):
Arrimate más; Rubantela; Punta Cubano (in duet with Infante)
Infante and Amaro dance to La Bomba.
Musical appearances by: Trío Janitzio; Son Clave de Oro; Mariachi Vargas
Time: 90 minutes.

Plot: Previously called Sopa de estrellas. Musical comedy. Ricardo del Valle y Rosales (Infante), son of a movie producer, is forced by his father to become a lawyer, but he really wants to be an actor. He gets together with a Rhumba dancer, Elena (played by Cuban Amparo), to make a film "Extravagancia musical." The production has non-stop problems.

Roberto is sued by his father for ruining his credit. Infante acts as his own lawyer. ("Tengo yo la culpa de tener el mismo nombre?" "Is it my fault I have the same name as my father?") It turns out the troublemaker is another actor who is the son of Ricardo's step-mother, and is denounced in court. The father is thrilled to lose the case because it proves his son can be a successful lawyer. Elena and Roberto kiss.

Infante's first film with Rodríguez is a "caótica, dislocada" musical comedy (García Riera). This is the start of a long successful association between the director and Infante. An enjoyable screwball comedy in the old Hollywood style. Look for Castelló and Reyes pulling a goofy impersonation of Jorge Negrete in "Ay, Jalisco no te rajes."

Also see the film description on Azteca

1945

Cuando lloran los valientes

1945
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Photographer: Jorge Stahl S.
Cast: Pedro Infante (Agapito Treviño);Virginia Serret (Chabela); Blanca Estela Pavón (Cristina); Victor Manuel Mendoza; Ramón Vallarino; Armando Soto La Marina El Chicote; Mimí Derba (mother of Pavón); Joaquinito Rocha Pinolillo (child).
Music and Songs by Raúl Lavista and Ernesto Cortázar.
Songs: Ramito de Azahar; Cuando lloran los valientes; Corrido de Monterrey (Ay, mi Nuevo Leon); Caballo blanco; Tal vez me puedan matar.
Musical appearances by: Trío Tamaulipecos; Los Vaqueros.
Awards: Infante nominated for Ariel but lost to Pedro Armendáriz in La Perla. Pavón won best actress and Mendoza won best supporting actor.
Time: 100 minutes.

Plot: Folkloric adventure. Monterrey, 1860. Begins: "Los corridos siempre se escriben con sangre y ésta no es excepción . . . una historia cruel, amarga, injusta." ("Corridos are always written with blood, and this one is no exception . . . A story cruel, bitter, unjust.")

A sentimental melodramatic story of rebels, machismo, revelations of paternity, patriotism and unrequited loves. Agapito (Infante) adopts an orphan boy whose parents have been killed. He wants to marry Cristina (Pavón) but is impeded by the jealousy of Chabela (Serret), daughter of Don Isauro. Chabela convinces Agapito to become engaged to her by announcing everyone things he seduced her.

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cont... April 13, 2005 5:57 PM

The federales arrive in pursuit of rebels. The Colonel, son of the general, prevents looting of the town but turns out to be a traitor.

Agapito flees to the mountains on his white horse, unites with the rebels, and becomes a Robin Hood type. Agapito and the Colonel are later sentenced to die by firing squad by the General who does not know that Agapito is his bastard son. The Colonel is killed trying to flee. Agapito tries to shoot his father/the general but shoots Cristina by accident when she intervenes. As she lies dying in his arms, she says "Es tu padre." (He's your father.)

Also see the film description on Azteca

1939

En un burro tres baturros

1939
Director: José Benavides, Jr.
Script: Carlos Orellana and José Benavides, Jr.
Music: Rafael de Paz
Photography: Víctor Herrera
Cast: Carlos Orellana, Sara García, Joaquín Pardavé, Carlos López Moctezuma

Infante has a fleeting appearance as an extra. He is almost unrecognizable as a guitar player at a party.

El organillero

1939
Director: José Benavides, Jr.
Music: Agustín Lara

An early short.
(Believed lost.)

1940

Puedes irte de mi

1940
Director: José Benavides, Jr.
Music: Agustín Lara
Time: 10 minutes
Cast: Pedro Infante, Rosa María

An early short where Pedro Infante appeared directing the orchestra.
(Believed lost.)

1942

La feria de las flores

1942

Director: José Benavides, Jr.
Photography: Jack Draper

Cast:
Antonio Badú (Valentín Mancera); María Luisa Zea (Sanjuana González); Stella Inda (Virginia); Fernando Fernández (Cipriano); Luis G. Barreiro (doctor Ponaoña); Victor Junco (comandante); Pedro Infante (friend); Tito Junco (Pablo); Angel T. Sala (don Dionisio Catalán); Salvador Quiroz (don Ausencio); Raúl Guerrero Chaplin (Gil, Jefe de la Acordada); Jorge Arriaga; Arturo Soto Rangel; Trío Calaveras; Manuel Dondé; Roberto Cañedo.

Music: Manuel Esperón.
Songs: By Chucho Monge y Manuel Esperón. La feria de las flores sung by Trío Badú, Fernando Fernández, and Pedro Infante.

Plot:
Originally entitled El valiente Valentín.
Pedro's first movie role, although without distinction or mustache. His role is secondary and mainly vocal support with nothing in the performance to predict his future fame.

A story of adventure, based on an historic corrido of the brave Valentín. The action involves a fight for the family honor after being cheated of the hacienda. The girl takes a bullet for the hero (Badú), who then marries her sister.

Jesusita en Chihuahua

1942
Director: René Cardona
Photography:
Cast: Susana Guízar; René Cardona; Pedro Infante; Susana Cora; Agustín Isunza.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Aguila o sol (Manuel Esperón y Ernesto Cortázar); Ay Chihuahua; El fronterizo (Balas de Plata); Coplas de los rivales; Corrido de Rosita Alvírez; Club Verde; Corrido de Rivera; Jesusita en Chihuahua; Cuanto Apache; Panseco (satiric).
Musical appearance by Las Tres Morenas and Los Plateados

Plot: Comedia ranchera. Infante wins the municipal presidency in a Chihuahua village. He's injured in an altercation between proponents of the opposing side, nursed back to health by his opponent's "marimacho" (tom boy) friend, Jesusita, who's looking for a man "mas hombre que yo" (more of a man than I am) to marry. Infante is interested in Teresa, who hates him (or thinks she does). She's also his opponent's girlfriend. He serenades her, proposes to her at a party, and finally kidnaps her.

When the opponent/fiance shows up and shoots him, Teresa dissolves in tears and declares she loves him with "todo el alma." But Infante is OK having arranged with Jesusita to put blanks in the gun. Jesusita marches off to the altar the man she's been in love with the whole time.

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La razón de la culpa April 13, 2005 5:59 PM

1942
Director: Juan José Ortega
Cast: Blanca de Castejón; Andrés Soler; María Elena Marqués; Pedro Infante; Mimí Derba; Ricardo Montalbán.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Rosalía (waltz) (Rafael García); Bendita palabra (Agustín Lara)
Time: 90 minutes.

Plot: Melodrama. On a boat sailing from Spain to Mexico, the Spaniard Roberto (Infante) falls in love with the married Mexicana María, who turns out to be the wife of a close friend of his recently deceased father. He stays with them while arranging for his inheritance, eventually meeting the daughter, overcoming town gossip, and marrying her. The only role where Infante played a non-Mexican.

Because of Infante's north Mexican accent, his voice was dubbed in this film!

1946

Si me han de matar manaña

1946
Director: Miguel Zacarías
Cast: Sofía Alvarea; Pedro Infante; René Cardona; Nelly Montiel; Armando Soto La Marina El Chicote; Miguel Arenas; Alfonso Bedoya; Miguel Inclán.
Songs: Serenata; Ojitos negros; Guadalajara, pues; El rebozo mexicano; Bajo el sol de Jalisco; Coplas de retache, El Aventurero.  (by Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar)
Musical Appearances by: Trío Asencio del Río; Trío Calaveras; Mariachi Vargas.

Plot: In Jalisco, Lupe sings in a dive owned by the unprincipled Genoveno. A stranger arrives looking for her but Genoveno has him shot as he approaches Lupe. He "dies" in her arms whispering something she can't understand but intrigues and moves her.

Ramiro (Infante) shows up from the north (they refer to him as "El Norteño") with his friend and sidekick Chicote. He's looking for the stranger who he discovers injured, not dead, and secrets him in his room to nurse him back to health.

Ramiro and Lupe fall in love, stirring up the jealosies of Genoveno and the pretentious Fanny (who tosses in English phrases to make herself look more important.)

Geneveno lures Lupe to his room in the middle of the night with a fake story so other people will see her leave his house and tell Ramiro and break up the romance. (You may remember this scenario from Alla en el Rancho Grande). The stranger turns out to be Lupe's father who's been searching for her since she was kidnapped as a child. True love wins out between Lupe and Ramiro.

 You may notice one of the hired guns is played by Alfonso Bedoya, later to gain fame as the smiling bandit Gold Hat in Treasure of the Sierra Madre ("We don't need to show you no stinkin' badges.")

Los tres García

1946
Director: Ismael Rodríguez, Carlos Orellana, Fernando Méndez
Cast: Sara García; Pedro Infante; Abel Salazar; Víctor Manuel Mendoza.
Songs: Dicen que soy mujeriego; Jesús Camacho; Ave María; Cielito lindo; Consentida; Mi Cariñito.
Awards: Nominated for an Ariel for best original screenplay; lost to Cinco rostros de mujer.
Time: 118 minutes

Plot: Comedia ranchera. In a village of the Bajío, the widow Doña Luisa (Sara García) scolds and rules with an iron hand (actually a walking stick) her three pugnacious grandsons, the three García cousins: Luis Antonio (Infante), womanizer and carouser; José Luis (Salazar), poor and proud; and Luis Manuel (Mendoza), rich and dandified. Each is the owner of his own ranch. A gringo tourist (Clifford Carr) shows up with his blond daughter, Lupita (López), another cousin. The "machísma trinidad" vies for the heart of Lupita and dodges being killed by Los López. Lupita, unable to decide among them, leaves. The three García pretend to have killed each other so she'll return. This time Infante does not get the girl, who chooses Salazar.

This comedy was a big box office success in Mexico.

Also see film description on Azteca

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Vuelven los García April 13, 2005 6:00 PM

1946
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Sara García; Pedro Infante;Abel Salazar; Víctor Manuel Mendoza; Marga López; Blanca Estela Pavón; Rogelio A. González (as León López); Clifford Carr (as Mister Johnny Jones).
Songs: Ay, qué dichoso soy; Maldita sea mi suerte; Ave María; Mi Cariñito.
Awards: Pavón nominated for an Ariel for best supporting actress but lost to Marga López in Soledad.
González was nominated for best supporting actor but lost to Juan García in La Perla.
Time: 105 minutes.

Plot: Sequel to Los tresGarcía

1946
Director: Ismael Rodríguez, Carlos Orellana, Fernando Méndez
Cast: Sara García; Pedro Infante; Abel Salazar; Víctor Manuel Mendoza.
Songs: Dicen que soy mujeriego; Jesús Camacho; Ave María; Cielito lindo; Consentida; Mi Cariñito.
Awards: Nominated for an Ariel for best original screenplay; lost to Cinco rostros de mujer.
Time: 118 minutes

Plot: Comedia ranchera. In a village of the Bajío, the widow Doña Luisa (Sara García) scolds and rules with an iron hand (actually a walking stick) her three pugnacious grandsons, the three García cousins: Luis Antonio (Infante), womanizer and carouser; José Luis (Salazar), poor and proud; and Luis Manuel (Mendoza), rich and dandified. Each is the owner of his own ranch. A gringo tourist (Clifford Carr) shows up with his blond daughter, Lupita (López), another cousin. The "machísma trinidad" vies for the heart of Lupita and dodges being killed by Los López. Lupita, unable to decide among them, leaves. The three García pretend to have killed each other so she'll return. This time Infante does not get the girl, who chooses Salazar.

This comedy was a big box office success in Mexico.

Also see film description on Azteca

Vuelven los García

1946
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Sara García; Pedro Infante;Abel Salazar; Víctor Manuel Mendoza; Marga López; Blanca Estela Pavón; Rogelio A. González (as León López); Clifford Carr (as Mister Johnny Jones).
Songs: Ay, qué dichoso soy; Maldita sea mi suerte; Ave María; Mi Cariñito.
Awards: Pavón nominated for an Ariel for best supporting actress but lost to Marga López in Soledad.
González was nominated for best supporting actor but lost to Juan García in La Perla.
Time: 105 minutes.

Plot: Sequel to Los tres García filmed at the same time. García Riera called this a "tragicomedy in two parts," the first part being the comedy and this the tragedy.

Luis Antonio (Infante), having lost the blond gringa in the first film, draws closer to his grandmother. The López family is still trying to get revenge and León López shoots up the wedding of Lupita (the gringa) and José Luis. José Luis and the priest are injured, and the grandmother soon dies from her wounds.

Infante is inconsolable, takes to drink and serenades his grandmother's grave in the pouring rain. Luis Manuel falls in love with the López sister (Pavón) which, of course angers her brother León who beats her up. Luis Antonio goes after León and they kill each other. The two remaining cousins marry their respective loves.

Also see film description on Azteca Films

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La barca de oro April 13, 2005 6:02 PM

1947La barca de oro

1947
Director: Joaquín Pardavé
Cast: Sofía Alvarez; Pedro Infante; Carlos Orellana; René Cardona; Fernando Soto Mantequilla; Nelly Montiel.
Music and songs by Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar.
Songs: La barca de oro
Time: 85 minutes.

Plot: A "pésima comedia" (García Riera) with a lot of music. Previously called El corrido de Chabela Vargas. Comedia ranchera.

Chabela (Alvarez), a young ranch owner, is criticized by her sister and uncle for being mannish ("machorra"). They try to involve her with Carlos, an engineer newly arrived from the city with new farm technology. Infante is a tenant and childhood friend of Chabela. He beats her in a horse race and she shows up at the festival dressed femininely and stunningly. Her uncle announces that she is engaged to marry Carlos (which is false.) Infante leaves thinking he's been rejected. She follows him, they fight, pull pistols on each other, then kiss. Later they have a daughter as "marimacho" as her mother.

García Riera thought Alvarez looked uncomfortable in her role and that Infante played only a small part in the action.

Soy charro de Rancho Grande

1947
Director: Joaquín Pardavé
Cast: Sofía Alvarez; Pedro Infante; René Cardona;Fernando Soto Mantequilla.
Music and songs by Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar.
Songs: La barca de oro
Time: 85 minutes.

Plot: A "pésima comedia" (García Riera) with a lot of music. Previously called El corrido de Chabela Vargas. Comedia ranchera.

Chabela (Alvarez), a young ranch owner, is criticized by her sister and uncle for being mannish ("machorra"). They try to involve her with Carlos, an engineer newly arrived from the city with new farm technology. Infante is a tenant and childhood friend of Chabela. He beats her in a horse race and she shows up at the festival dressed femininely and stunningly. Her uncle announces that she is engaged to marry Carlos (which is false.) Infante leaves thinking he's been rejected. She follows him, they fight, pull pistols on each other, then kiss. Later they have a daughter as "marimacho" as her mother.

García Riera thought Alvarez looked uncomfortable in her role and that Infante played only a small part in the action.

Soy charro de Rancho Grande

1947
Director: Joaquín Pardavé
Cast: Sofía Alvarez; Pedro Infante; René Cardona;Fernando Soto Mantequilla.
Music and songs by Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar.
Songs: La Motivosa; Me voy por ahí.
Time: 80 minutes.

Plot: Comedia ranchera. Filmed together with La barca de oro with the same actors.

Paco (Infante) leaves the Jalisco town of Rancho Grande (the fictional town created by Guz Aguila in Allá en el Rancho Grande and re-created here). Paco says goodbye to his patrón and his fiancé Cristina (Alvarez) and travels with friend El Olote to the big city (Mexico City) to try his fortune. He wins first prize in a charro contest and is photographed kissing the "Queen of the Cowboys."

Paco returns to the ranch and discovers that his girlfriend, jealous after seeing the photograph in the papers, is now married to the patron. They flirt with each other and Paco tries valiently to honorably resist Cristina's advances, even when she comes to his room and begs for them to run off together and even suggesting they commit suicide together.

Eventually it turns out that Cristina's marriage is a practical joke and all ends happily.

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Nosotros los pobres April 13, 2005 6:04 PM

1947
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (Pepe, el Toro); Evita Muñoz; Carmen Montejo; Blanca Estela Pavón (Celia, La Romántica); Miguel Inclán; Carmen Montejo (La Tísica); Katy Jurado; Pedro de Urdimalas;
Music: Manuel Esperón, and others.
Songs: Amorcito Corazón; Ni hablar mujer.
Musical appearance by Trío Cantarrecio.
Time: 125 minutes.

Plot: The humble and widowed Pepe El Toro (Infante), the village carpenter, is the father of Chachita, fiancé of Celia, and brother of a sick prostitute. The rich Montes, who wants Celia, has Pepe falsely accused of the murder of a money lender and sent to prison. Everything Pepe owns is repossessed including his mother's wheel chair.

Pepe escapes from prison and after seeing his daughter be rude to the prostitute, tells Chachita that she is her real mother and he's not her father. Chachita embraces her hospitalized mother who promptly dies. Pepe's mother dies shortly thereafter.

Returned to prison, Pepe discovers the real murderer and plucks out his eye to make him confess. He's released from prison and marries Celia.

This neorealistic melodrama was an enormous box office success and was, and is still, one of the most exhibited movies on Mexican TV.

Also see film description on Azteca Films

Cartas Marcadas

1947
Director: René Cardona
Cast: Pedro Infante; Marga López; René Cardona; Armando Soto La Marina El Chicote.
Music: Federico Ruiz and Rosalío Ramírez.
Songs: Cartas marcadas (Chucho Monge); Oh, qué amor (Chucho Monge);
By Chucho Monge and Ernesto Cortázar: Ay mis cuates; La gallinita ponedora; Serenata; Palabritas de amor.
Musical appearance by Trío Janitzio.

Plot: Comedy. In the village of Maroma, Doña Camila will leave her inheritance to her step-children Victoria (López) and the ranchero Manuel (Infante) provided that they marry. Don Manuel (Cardona, who is also the director of the film) is Victoria's father and Manuel's godfather. Of course, Victoria and Manuel hate each other and each wants the other to withdraw from the wedding so he/she can be the sole inheritor.

Manuel has his friend Tepalcate (Chicote) take a rat to Victoria which terrifies her and her friends. Manuel shoots and kills it. Victoria, her father, and Dr. Ernesto Panseco (her suitor) visit the hacienda of Manuel, which she is also half owner of because of the inheritance. He refuses to let her eat or sleep in "his" half.

Manuel kisses her; furious, she concedes the fortune. Manuel sends her gifts; she throws them on top of him as he serenades her. Manuel gets drunk and renounces his inheritance as well. She thinks he's injured and rushes to his side only to become angry to find he's not hurt. When a final disposition frees them from having to marry each other, they elope.

The publicity at the time read "Sin muertitos! Sin matones! Un México que ríe!" (No bodies! No killings! A Mexico that laughs!" 

1948

Los tres huastecos

1948
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (in a triple part); Blanca Estela Pavón; Fernando Soto Mantequilla; María Eugenia Llamas (little girl); Eduardo Arozamena; Guillermo Calles; Alejandro Ciangherotti.
Music: Raúl Lavista and Nacho García
Songs: La Burrita; Conejo Blas; Atardecer Huasteco.
Awards: Ismael Rodríguez nominated for Ariel both for best director and best screenplay; lost to Emilio el Indio Fernández for Río escondido.
Infante nominated for best actor; lost to Carlos López Moctezuma.
María Eugenia Llamas nominated for best juvenile role.
Picture nominated for best adaptation and best editing.
Time: 120 minutes.

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:05 PM

Plot: Infante plays three roles: Lorenzo Andrade, Captain Víctor Andrade, and Father Juan de Dios Andrade. The three Andrade brothers are raised separately. Víctor is a distinguished army captain with a mustache. Juan de Dios is a priest en El Potosino and is clean shaven. Lorenzo is the owner of a cantina and is a coarse atheist with a large droopy mustache.

Their resemblance to each other (well, they are all played by Infante) leads to situations of mistaken identity (both accidental and intentional). Lorenzo is the widowed father of a little girl who is growing up wild and macho. He is also suspected of being the criminal "El Coyote." The other brothers have to disguise themselves to prove his innocence.

The story ends with the three Infantes singing a trio "Lo que pudo ser tragedia resultó ser vacilón" (What could have been a tragedy ended up humorous).

Although the movie was successful at the box office, García Riera thought that director Rodríguez achieved too little by attempting too much ("a más Infantes, menos historia"). (Aside: Pedro Infante's brother Angel played one of the movie doubles.)

Also see film description on Azteca

Angelitos negros

1948
Director: Joselito Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante, Emilia Guiú, Rita Montaner, Titina Romay, Chela Castro; Chimi Monterrey.
Music: Raúl Lavista and Nacho García.
Songs: Angelitos negros (Manuel Alvarez Maciste and Andrés Eloy Blanco); Belén (Eliseo Grenet); Mi primer amor (Chucho Monge); Tus ojitos (Chucho Monge); Danza Sagrada.
Musical appearances: Cuarteto América; Meride y Pastor (Dancers)
Time: 100 minutes

Plot: The famous singer José Carlos Ruiz (Infante) courts and marries the rich, blond Ana Luisa (Guiú). Neither knows that Ana Luisa is the daughter of her black maid, Mercé (played by Cuban Montaner) and the patrón. When their first child is born black, the baby is rejected by the mother who thinks the "fault" lies with José Carlos, who loves the child. The mother, ashamed, distances herself from her child and husband and the girl is raised by José Carlos and Mercé. Isabel, a black dancer who is in love with José Carlos, helps him when Ana Luisa deserts her family. Returning unexpectedly, Ana Luisa catches her husband and Isabel in an innocent embrace, and furious, slaps Mercé causing her to fall down a flight of stairs. After learning the truth, Ana Luisa is pardoned by her dying mother, is reconciled with her husband, and learns to love her daughter.

Only one minor character in this "anti-racist" melodrama is actually black, Chimi Monterrey, who plays the part of Fernando, a friend of José Carlos, who is rejected as a witness at the wedding by Ana Luisa. At one point, even Infante goes black face to sing what García Riera describes as "between horrible and afrocubano." The little girl is played by Titina Romay, the director's daughter.

García Riera states that Infante played the role most "ñoño y meloso" (feeble-minded and affectedly sweet) of his career.

The film was very successful in Mexico. It is clearly based on Fannie Hurst's 1933 novel Imitation of Life which was made into the 1934 film directed by John Stahl with Claudette Colbert, and remade into the 1959 Lana Turner film.

Also see the film description in Azteca

Ustedes los ricos

1948
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Pepe El Toro); Blanca Estela Pavón (as Celia La Chorreada); Evita Muñoz; Fernando Soto Mantequilla; Miguel Manzano.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Amorcito corazón; Suerte Chaparra.
Awards: Pavón nominated for Ariel for best actress; lost to María Félix for Río Escondido.
Time: 130 minutes.

Plot: Sequel to Nosotros los pobres. " Melodrama populachero"

Pepe el Toro hits the car of the rich Manuel with his truck "El Chimengüenchón." Manuel is his niece Chachita's real father and the abuser of his recently deceased sister.

Manuel, in a childless marriage, tries to lure Chachita with money and then threats to Pepe. El Tuerto (The One-Eyed) escapes from prison and sets an explosion in the neighborhood. Manuel dies rescuing Chachita, but Pepe only manages to recover the body of El Torito, his little son. Pepe shuts himself up in a room with the body ala Clark Gable in Gone With the Wind only lured out by the sobbing of his wife. (Rodríguez also lifts a story from O'Henry when Chachita cuts her hair to buy her boyfriend a watch chain, while he sells his watch to buy her a hair comb.) Pepe is lured to a roof-top trap and takes revenge by causing the violent deaths of El Tuerto and his accomplices in a fight.

The lonely wife of Manuel shows up at the house and is accepted into the circle by the good-hearted but poor family.

This was another huge success for the team of Infante/Rodríguez.

(Note: On the side of one of the buildings is painted "Sí Existe" undoubtedly in answer to the great firestorm provoked by Diego Rivera who included in his famous mural "Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in the Alameda" at the Hotel Prado the phrase "Dios no existe." This mural was moved to its own building after the Hotel Prado was destroyed in the 1985 earthquake.)

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Dicen que soy mujeriego April 13, 2005 6:07 PM

1948
Director: Roberto Rodríguez
Cast: Sara García; Pedro Infante; Silvia Derbez; Rodolfo Landa; Fernando Soto Mantequilla; Arturo Soto Rangel.
Songs: By Manuel Esperón: El enamorado; Serenata a una flor; Cariñito; Mis dulces quereres; Various rumbas and coplas.
by Gilberto Parra: La vaca lechera;
Musical appearances by Trío Hermanos Samperio and Cuarteto América.
Time: 115 minutes.

Plot: Comedia Ranchera. A resurrection for "Los Tres García," as the womanizing, carousing grandson Pedro (Infante) and the mannish, cigar smoking matriarch (Sara García) are re-paired.

The municipal president Pablo (Landa) wants to marry Flor (Derbez). Doña Rosa pushes her grandson Pedro to pursue Flor. Pedro renounces all his past loves in a serenade to go after Flor. Pablo tries to frame Pedro by presenting an orphan as his love child. The truth wins out and Pedro and Flor marry.

Also see the film description on Azteca

1949

El seminarista

1949
Director: Roberto Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Miguel Morales); Silvia Derbez; Fernando Soto Mantequilla; Arturo Soto Rangel.
Music: Raúl Lavista
Songs: Ramito de Azahar; Himno Guadalupano.
Time: 95 minutes.

Plot: Melodrama with a "desbigotado y severo" Infante.
Miguel (Infante) returns to his village from seminary school accompanied by Toño (Mantequilla), his worshipful friend from the seminary. He visits his womanizing and parrandero uncle Pancho (Soto Rangel) who tells Miguel that he's not quite a man and gets Toño involved in his carousing. Miguel teaches in a girls' school. Many complications arise with jealous lovers, loose women, and various temptations. Ultimately, Miguel leaves the priesthood with a sigh of relief and marries Mercedes. (Even as a priest Infante gets the girl). Toño, however, does go on to make a priest.

Also see the description on Azteca

La mujer que yo perdí

1949
Director: Roberto Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (Pedro Montaño); Blanca Estela Pavón (María); Manuel R. Ojeda (Don Joaquín (Pedro's godfather); Aurora Walquer (Pedro's godmother); Guillermo Calles (Macedonio) Eduardo Arozamena (Abuelo); Silvia Pinal (Laura); José Luis Jiménez (José Marcos); Antonio Frausto (Jefe Político) Angel Infante (Marcial, Agitador); .
Music: Raúl Lavista
Songs: La Casita; Linda Bella.
Time: 95 minutes.

Plot: Previously entitled Lo que no pudo ser. Melodrama rural. Takes places at the beginning of the century.

Pedro (Infante) accidentally kills the son of an attorney in a fight defending the honor of his finace Laura (Pinal). He hides from the ranch owner, Don Joaquín (Ojeda), with his godparents but leaves when warned by the wife. The federales are violently forcing the peons into the military and destroy the town. The Indians, Macedonio (Calles), his daughter María (Pavón) and the grandfather flee.

The political boss (Frausto), puppet of Don Joaquín, sends some Indians to the Valle Nacional for not informing on the fugitives and Pedro, who's taken refuge with María and her grandfather after forcing money from her uncle.

Pedro has become a Robin Hood. Macedonio is killed by the federales. When Pedro is injured, María nurses him and takes a message to the jealous Laura. The indian José Marcos (Jiménez), who loves María, denounces them. María helps Pedro escape the federales. Fidel, the servant of Don Joaquín, robs and kills him. Pedro is accused of the crime.

 Pedro has Laura brought to him but she refuses to follow him. María protects Pedro in an ambush and takes the bullet. The revolutionaries arrive just in time to defeat the federales. Pedro sends Laura away in preference to María not realizing she's been shot. She dies as Pedro carries her away on horseback, dropping the huaraches (primitive shoes) that Pedro has been trying to put on her the whole time.

This is the last picture made by Infante with his close friend Pavón who would die in a plane crash later that year.

Also see film description on Azteca

La oveja negra

1949
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Fernando Soler; Pedro Infante; Amanda del Llano; Andrés Soler; Virginia Serret; Dalia Iñiguez; Wolf Rubinski.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: by Gilberto Parra; Jenaro Núñez; Manuel Esperón; Charro Felipe Gil; and others. Guitar: Clemente Perea.
Songs: Todos metemos la pata; Con el tiempo y un ganchito; Amor de los dos.
Time: 110 minutes

Plot: This pairing of the two much beloved actors, Soler and Infante, begins as a regional comedy and ends as a melodrama.

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:09 PM

Taking place in a north Mexican Village, the carouser Cruz (Soler) treats his oldest son Silvano (Infante) like a child. When Cruz falls deep into debt, Silvano challenges and beats the pícaro Sotern (Jambrina) at cards who pays off by losing to Soler.

Silvano's ex-lover Justina tries to make him jealous by becoming the girlfriend of his father, naturally causing much pain to Cruz' long-suffering wife Bilbiana (Llano).

The son and father run for prefect of police and Silvano wins. Bilbiana falls gravely ill when her husband shows up drunk and with Justina to Silvano's engagement party. Cruz tries to humiliate his son by obligating him to shine his shoes.

When Cruz leaves his wife for Justina, Silvano make the grand sacrifice for his mother by breaking his engagement with Marielba so Justiana will leave his father. Cruz brutally hits his son, and Bilbiana collapses upon seeing the blood. Silvano forces his father to stay with Bilbiana as she dies, her final act to reconcile father and son.

Despite being a struggle between good and evil, or perhaps between saintliness and depravity, García Riera thinks they are both sides of the same macho coin.

Also see film description on Azteca

No desearás la mujer de tu hijo

1949
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Fernando Soler; Pedro Infante; Andrés Soler; Carmen Molina; Amanda del Llano; Irma Aguirre (aka Irma Dorantes); Amelia Wilhelmy.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs by: Gilberto Parra; Jenaro Núñez; Manuel Esperón; Charro Felipe Fil and others. Guitar: Clemente Perea. Appearance by Mariachi Vargas.
Songs: María, María; Que te falta; Con un polvo y otro polvo.
Awards: Fernando Soler won Ariel for best actor over Arturo de Córdova and Pedro Armendáriz.
Andr&eacutes Soler nominated for co-star. Time: 100 minutes.

Plot: Sequel to La Oveja Negra.

After the death of Bilbiana, the repentant Cruz locks himself up in his room with his pistol, his dog and his mezcal determined to starve himself. Silvano is forced to pay the mortgage by selling his recently deceased mother's earrings. His former fiancee has married Régulo.

Cruz recovers under the coquetishness of the maid's granddaughter and goes out on a drunk. Silvano is furious but also joins him getting drunk and sings and cries with his father. They pick a fight with some strangers in the bar. Mindlessly drunk back home, they cry in front of Bilbiana's portrait and promise never to replace her. Cruz declares himself his son's friend.

Silvano falls in love with Josefa but Cruz mistakenly believes she loves him (aren't there enough women in this town to go around?) Discovering she is to marry Silvano, he forces his son to kneel in front of him and beg forgiveness and renounce Josefa. Silvano finally rebels and gains some backbone and lays it on the line to his father.

Cruz rides off in the rain on his son's beloved horse, Cancia, and is injured when he tries to jump a fence. The distraught Silvano is forced to kill the injured animal. Cruz dies surrounded by his family and we see him reunited in heaven with Bilbiana after successfully jumping the heavenly fence.

Also see film description on Azteca Films

1950

Sobre las olas

 1950
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Juventino Rosas); Alicia Neira; José Luis Jiménez; Andrés Soler; Beatriz Aguirre
Music: Raúl Lavista
Songs: By Juventino Rosas: Sobre las olas; Dolores; Carmen.
aire from the opera Norma (by Vicente Bellini).
Time: 128 minutes.

Plot: Infante's first color movie.

The musician/composer Juventino Rosas (Infante) drinks, plays music, and gets in trouble. He is loved by the daughter of the orchestra conductor, Lolita (Aguirre), who in turn is loved by Rosas friend Pepe.

Rosas plays in an orchestra in front of Porfirio Díaz and the rich Dolores, daughter of a diplomat. When Dolores drops her fan in flirtation, Rosas tries to retrieve it and accidentally knocks into the pool a man he believes to be the dictator Díaz. (It turns out to be his secretary.)   [ send green star]

 
cont April 13, 2005 6:11 PM

Rosas is humiliated when he is cheated out of the waltz he composed, Sobre las Olas. Disillusioned, he sails for Havana where Lolita dies en route. Shortly aferward, Rosas dies and his remains are returned to Mexico with great honor.

Based on a true story and a re-make of the 1932 Miguel Zacarías film of the same title, which stuck closer to the historic facts. García Riera feels this film is more faithful to the myth of Pedro Infante than that of Juventino Rosas.

Also see film description on Azteca Films

Tambíen de dolor se canta

1950
Director: René Cardona
Cast: Pedro Infante (Braulio Peláez); Guillermina Grin (Elisa Miranda, an actress); Oscar Pulido (Facundo Paláez, the father and a failed dentist); Irma Dorantes (Elisa, the sister); Rafael Alcayde (Alfonso, the actor); Fanny Kaufman (Daniela, the mother).
Special appearances by Germán Valdés Tin Tan; Antonio Badú; Leticia Palma; Miguel Morayta; Luis Hernández Bretón; Pedro Vargas (who sings a memorable duet with Infante).
Music: Luis Hernández Bretón
Songs: Cielito lindo; Qué lindo es Michoacán; La negra noche; La Barca de Guaymas; El Reboso.
Time: 97 minutes

Plot: Braulio (Infante) is a myopic school teacher, poorly dressed and with coke bottle glasses. Due to his bad eye sight, he walks in front of a car causing it to swerve and crash. He invites the driver home, who turns out to be Alfonso del Medrazo (Alcayde), the favorite actor of his mother Daniela (Kaufman) and his sister Luisa (Dorantes). The actor Alfonso promises to make Luisa a star if she ever comes to the capital.

Braulio agrees reluctantly to accompany his sister to seek fame, but when they get there, Alfonso doesn't remember her. The actress Elisa (Grin), impressed with Braulio's singing, wants him to be her leading man in her next picture. He accepts on condition that the producers also give his sister a chance. They gave her the script of "Gone With the Wind" to memorize to put her off.

Braulio changes his name to Alfredo Malvarrosa (Alfred Hollyhock). He's a disaster as an actor, as is his sister, and he loses his contract. He can't pay for the dental cabinet he has sent home to his father, a failed dentist.

On their sad journey home on the train, the two siblings discover they've won the lottery. She marries her hometown boyfriend and Braulio returns to school teaching little boys. He's reunited with Elisa when she appears in his class.

Islas Marías

1950
Director: Emilio El Indio Fernández
Cast: Pedro Infante; Rosaura Revueltas; Rocío Sagaón; Jaime Fernández; Tito Junco.
Music: Antonio Díz Conde
Song: El cobarde (José Alfredo Jiménez)
Time: 82 minutes.

Plot: Rosa, the widow of a revolutionary war hero, plans a fiesta to celebrate the graduation of her son Ricardo from military school. Ricardo drags his brother Felipe (Infante), a frustrated drunkard and medical school dropout, from a cabaret to go to their mother's fiesta. On the way, they discover their sister Alejandra in a hotel room just after she's murdered her lover, Carlos. Both brothers take responsibility for their sister's crime. Felipe is arrested and Ricardo, dishonored, commits suicide. Felipe is sentenced to hard labor on Islas Marías. After surviving a jail break and a stabbing in the back and various mistreatment, he is freed and marries a local girl. Felipe returns to Mexico to find his mother a blind beggar and his sister a prostitute.

García Riera states that director Fernández converts Infante into a somber figure in this ill-tempered melodrama of frustration.

Also see film description on Azteca

El gavilán pollero

1950
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante (José Inocencio Meléndez El Gavilán); Antonio Badú; Lilia Prado; Armando Arriola;
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Ella; El gavilán pollero; Cuatro caminos; Acuérdate; María Cristina; Oigame Compadre.
Musical appearances by Facundo Rivero y Su Conjunto
Time: 98 minutes.

Plot: Comedia ranchera.

The inseparable pair, José Inocencia El Gavilán Pollero (Infante) and Luis (Badú) are a pair of wandering and irresponsible cowboys who suffer through various misadventures on a trip to the capital and back, including getting drunk, getting shot, landing in jail and escaping from the clutches of predatory females who would trap them into a sedentary and diligent life.

The two almost fight a duel over a woman (who prods them on) but the unbreakable bonds of friendship win out, they throw the offending woman (Prado) in the river and take off with two new women who conveniently happen by.

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Las mujeres de mi general April 13, 2005 6:13 PM

1950
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante (as General Juan Zepeda); Lilia Prado; Chula Prieto; Miguel Manzano; Miguel Inclán; Arturo Soto Rangel; Lupe Inclán; Angel Infante.
Music: Raúl Lavista
Songs: by Chucho Monge, Pedro de Urdimalas and others. La Comezón del Amor; Alevántate (Serenata Mexicana)
Time: 100 minutes.

Plot: Revolutionary melodrama.

General Juan Zepeda (Infante) enters Ciudad Martínez during the Mexican Revolution accompanied by his troops and his soldadera Lupe (Prado). He discovers an old flame there, the vamp Carlota (Prieto) who's married to the now fugitive Fermín (Rangel), the town's richest man. Juan saves Fermín's 17-year-old son Romulito from being hung.

Carlota eventually kills her husband by shooting him in the back, and all believe that Juan is the guilty party. Lupe gives birth to a little girl. Carlota has the child taken away and Lupe thrown in prison, where she sings a pathetic lullaby to a bottle. Carlota tells Juan that Lupe has run off with another man.

The town is attacked by a much superior force of Ferderales. Juan and Lupe (with the baby strapped to her back), now reunited, wage a fight to the end with the government troops.

Also see film description on Azteca

1951

Necesito dinero

1951
Director: Miguel Zacarías and Edmundo Báez
Cast: Pedro Infante; Sara Montiel; Irma Dorantes; Gustavo Rivero.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Necesito dinero; Anoche; Qué suerte la mía; Las tres cosas; Silbando el mambo; Amor escondido.
Time: 126 minutes.

Plot: Romantic comedy. Manuel (Infante), a car mechanic, considers María Teresa (Montiel) his "ideal woman." She's being courted by the rich José Antonio (Rivero) and Manuel needs money to compete with him. He invents a compact battery, enters a singing contest with his friends El Yuca and El California (they lose), competes in a boxing match, and finally finds a large sum of money in a car. Various complications with María Teresa almost marrying José Antonio until she sees him hit an old girlfriend.

Manuel patents his battery invention and they live happily ever after.

ATM: A toda máquina

1951
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante; Luis Aguilar; Aurora Segura.
Music: Raúl Lavista and Sergio Guerrero.
Songs: Despierta; Yo no fue; Bésame mucho; Gringuita; and others.
Review: Variety 11/21/51; Richard Item #3645
Time: 118 minutes.

Plot: Previously called Su mejor enemigo. Comedy. The cowboy buddy movie transplanted to an urban setting where the stars play two stunt-riding motorcycle cops in this popular movie.

The motorcyclist Luis (Luis Aguilar) wins a place on the Escuadroón Acrobático de la Dirección de Tránsito, which his buddy (Infante) soon joins. The two pull stunts, try to seduce women, fight, make up, and sing a ton of songs.

Infante frequently shunned the use of a double to do his own stunts, much to the director's dismay. Said Rodríguez; "Era muy juguetón e irresponsable, le encantabe hacerme enojar." (Infante "was mischievous and irresponsible; he loved to make me angry.")

Note: Don't confuse with ATM II, which was made many years later with Infante's son, Pedro Infante Jr. Many movie lists confuse the movies made by the two actors.

Also see the film description on Azteca

Qué te ha dado esa mujer?

1951
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante; Luis Aguilar; Carmen Montejo; Rosita Arenas.
Music: Raúl Lavista and Sergio Guerrero.
Songs: Qué te ha dado esa mujer?; Rancho alegre; Despierta; Corazón; Te he de querer.
Time: 100 minutes.

Plot: Sequel to ATM. Pedro and Luis have made a pact never to marry, which, of course, precedes numerous complications with numerous women, various misunderstandings between the two buddies and leading to the ultimate fight and reconciliation between the two. Director Rodríguez thought to make a third in this series to be entitled En el camino andamos but gave it up, perhaps because this one was less successful than ATM.

Also see film description on Azteca Films

 [ send green star]

 
Ahí viene Martín Corona April 13, 2005 6:15 PM

1951
Director: Miguel Zacarías
Cast: Pedro Infante (Martín Corona); Sara Montiel (Rosario Medina); Eulalio González Piporro
Songs: By José Alfredo Jiménez: Del mero norte; Paloma querida
By Rubén Fuentes and Rubén Méndez: Copa tras copa; Cartas a Eufemia; Siempre siempre;
By Manuel Quiroga and Antonio de León: Para el carro; Canción del ole;
By Montoya y Solano: Copla en las noches
By Manuel Esperón and Ernesto Cortázar: Amorcito de mi vida
Review: Variety 7/2/52; Richard Item #3653
Time: 96 minutes

Plot: Previously called Amorcito de mi vida.

Taking place in the rural north Mexico, this aventura ranchera is about the norteño hero. The beginning seems to have little to do with the rest of the picture. Infante and his friend/adoptive father Piporro disguise themselves as a bearded stagecoach driver and an English school marm respectively to capture robbers (and the reward). Piporro in veil and dress croons falsetto "ohh... Mexican ban-deets/ hombres on horses/ ess real exciting."

 Rosaura (Montiel) arrives from Spain to claim her inheritance, a ranch, but it's been taken over by others. She flees with her friend Serafín, passing herself off as the Spanish flamenco singer Carmen Linares. Martín, hombre de pistola, caballo, baraja (cards), copa (drink) and guitarra, has to rescue Rosaura twice from bad types trying to take away her ranch. The last rescue results in a grandiose fist fight in great Western pic tradition. Rosaura gets her ranch but in the end must chase Martín through the countryside to finally win her man.

Both Infante and Montiel get ample chance to sing. José Alfredo Jimenez appears in two group scenes. Another notable scene is where Pedro writes a letter for an illiterate peasant (played by his real life brother Angel). Infante "reads back" (sings) "Cartas a Eufemia" mugging and winking at the camera.

Photography is by the renowned Gabriel Figueroa. Great box office success.

El Enamorado

1951
Director: Miguel Zacarías
Cast: Pedro Infante; Sara Montiel; Eulalio González Piporro; Armando Silvestre; Irma Dorantes.
Songs: Un diá nublado; Viejos amigos; Del mero norte; Corrido de Martín Corona; Siempre siempre; Ahí vienen los mariachis; La buenaventura.
Time: 95 minutes.

Plot: Previously called Vuelve Martín Corona. and sequal to Ahí viene Martín Corona. Rosaura and Martín are now married and the parents of twins, a boy and a girl.

1952

Un rincón cerca del cielo

1952
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Pedro González); Marga López; Silvia Pinal; Andrés Soler; Antonio Aguilar; Luis Aceves Castañeda.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Serenata sin luna; Arrullo; Cartas a Eufemia; La Princesa Caramelo; Duerme; El Hijo del Pueblo.
Awards: Infante nominated for Ariel for best actor; lost to Pedro Armendáriz in El rebozo de soledad
Marga López nominated for Ariel for best actress; lost to Stella Inda for El rebozo de soledad
Silvia Pinal won Ariel for best supporting actress.
Time: 120 minutes.

Plot: Previously called El hijo del pueblo. The honest, humble and hopeful Pedro arrives in the capital and gets work in an office. He falls in love with one of his co-workers, Margarita (López), and they marry. When she becomes pregnant, the jealous boss fires Pedro.

Margarita, ever of good cheer, finds them a ramshackle room up a long flight of stairs on the roof of a building (thus the title "Cerca del Cielo" or "Close to Heaven"). She works hard as a seamstress and laundress to support their child. Pedro gets work as a body guard to the despicable Martín (Aceves). When the kindly Chemal (Soler) confronts Martín about his relationship with his daughter, Martín orders Pedro to hit the old man. Pedro, tired of being humiliated by the thug, refuses and hits Martín instead.

Chemal's hard headed and flashy daughter (Pinal) breaks with her father and runs off to the big city. Chemal turns thief and hides a stash of money with Pedro and Margarita, but the police discover it and send Pedro to prison.

After prison, Pedro reunites with his long-suffering wife. One day Margarita overhears the neighbors pitying her because her husband is seeing another woman. She follows Pedro and discovers he's earning money the only way he can, as a street clown and the "other woman" is his partner. He is humiliated that his wife and son have seen him.

 

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:17 PM

Tragedy continues and the boy gets pneumonia and dies before Pedro can get the money for medicine by robbing a rich dandy in the street. Distraught and defeated, he attempts to commit suicide by jumping off a rail road bridge but only ends up lame.

The saintly Margarita leads him to their home altar to reunite him with God after telling him that she is to have another child.

Ahora soy rico

1952
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante; Marga López; Antonio Aguilar; Irma Dorantes; Eduardo Alcaraz; Arturo Soto Rangel.
Music: Manuel Eperón
Songs: Bésame en la boca; La que se fue; Ahora soy rico; Mi Adoración.
Time: 110 minutes.

Plot: Previously called Lejos del cielo and Ya soy rico. Sequel to Un rincón cerca del cielo.

Pedro (Infante) joins a band of delinquents. He thinks he's responsible for a murder although the real culprit is the band's leader Damián (González).

Trying to go straight, Pedro obtains a job as a salesman from the engineer Tony (Aguilar). Among other things, he becomes rich, becomes a carrouser, takes a mistress (Dorantes, who would eventually become Infante's last wife), and gets involved in a drug robbery. His long-suffering wife, Margarita, leaves him but they reconcile after learning his mistress'es expected child is not his.

Margarita gives birth to a little boy. Pedro has to go back to prison when he honorably confesses to the drug theft for which Tony has been falsely accused. 

Por ellas aunque mal paguen

1952
Director: Juan Bustillo Oro
Cast: Fernando Soler (Anastasio Adolfo Armijo de Arpegio); Ángel Infante; Pedro Infante; Silvia Pinal; Irma Dorantes; Alfonso Bedoya; Tito Gómez; Fanny Schiller; Miguel Ángel López; Nicolás Rodríguez.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Por ellas aunque mal paguen; La del estribo; Cómo estoy enamorado; Te he de querer; Las alazanas; La negra; Las Isabeles.
Special appearance: Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán
Time: 102 minutes.

Plot: Comedia Ranchera.

 A star vehicle to launch the career of Pedro Infante's brother Ángel and in which Pedro took only a small part.

In this re-make of the superior Al son de la marimba (1940), the location is moved from Chiapas to Jalisco. Don Anastasio (Soler) is a ruined aristocrat but he and his family refuse to work. He marries his daughter Isabel (Pinal) to the rich ranch owner José Manuel (Ángel Infante). The family then tries to fleece him of his ranch.

José Manuel convinces the family that he's really the overseer of the ranch, not the owner, and obligates them to work hard for the first time in their lives. They are, of course, redeemed by learning to enjoy earning a living.

Pedro Infante (playing himself) crashes his plane at the ranch (a reflection of the real-life previous accidents of the star) and convinces José Manuel to forgive his now pregnant wife who now loves him.

García Riera said of this film that "nada tenía de original."

Los hijos de María Morales

1952
Director: Fernando Méndez
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Pepe Morales); Antonio Badú (as Luis Morales); Carmen González; Irma Dorantes; Andrés Soler; Emma Roldán.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Corrido de María Morales; El papalote; Corazón, corazón; El Cocinero; Café con Piquete; Rosita de olivo.
Time: 93 minutes.

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:19 PM

Plot:

Brothers Pepe and Luis (Infante and Badú) are declared the "guests of honor" of Don Carlos (Soler) and are put in a furnished cell. The boys' mother, María Morales, comadre of Don Carlos, has promised that one of her sons will marry his daughter (another María). The younger María and her friend Gloria (González) dress as servants to get a look at the two brothers.

Later the brothers, having escaped, discover who the girls are when they are crowned queen and princess at a local fiesta. They shut the girls up in a room at their ranch and taunt them with food. The girls dress up as cowboys (except for their high heels) and reverse the situation.

Finally, Don Carlos and María madre arrive and settle matters. Pepe marries the young María and Luis marries Gloria.

The younger María is played by Irma Dorantes who would become Infante's last wife and mother of his youngest child (who is now the singer Irma Infante). The marriage was anulled by the Mexican courts by the pleadings of his first wife. Infante was killed in a plane crash in 1957 flying from Yucatan to Mexico City to work matters out with his first wife.

Dos tipos de cuidado

1952
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante; Jorge Negrete; José Elías Moreno; Carmen González; Yolanda Varela; Mimí Derba; Carlos Orellana; Queta Lavat; Arturo Soto Rangel.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Malo y Bueno (sung in a dueling duet between Infante and Negrete); La Tertulia (sung by Infante); Fiesta Mexicana; La Gloria eres tú (sung by Infante); Mía; Ojos Tapatíos; Alevántate (Serenata Mexicana) (sung by Infante); Qué Hubo? (sung by Negrete); Serenata tapatia (written by Esperón/Cortázar - sung by Negrete);
Review: Variety 4/7/54; Richard Item #3820
Time: 111 minutes.

Plot: The only film where Negrete and Infante appeared together.

Jorge Bueno (Negrete) returns to his pueblo after a year's absence and finds the woman he loves has married his best friend, Pedro Malo (Infante: in one scene his hat says "No seas malo" - Don't be bad). They are the parents of a new baby girl. Pedro appears to be a cad because he's carrousing and pursuing Jorge's sister, María (Varela).

Jorge buys the hacienda next to Pedro's so he can cut off the water to Pedro's land and ruin him. After a secret meeting, Jorge serenades Pedro's wife. It turns out that Pedro has married to protect the reputation of Jorge's girlfriend who was violated in the capital and became pregnant. All switch partners in the end.

As would be expected from the pairing of the two greatest charro movie stars, this was a huge box office hit.

The title is hilariously translated as "Two Careful Fellows" in Variety. (A better translation would be "Two Dangerous Fellows" or "Two Guys You Better Watch Out For" or "Careful with Those Guys.")

Ansiedad

1952
Director: Miguel Zacarías
Cast: Libertad Lamarque; Pedro Infante; Irma Dorantes; Arturo Soto Rangel; Felipe Montoya.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Amor de mis amores (by Agustín Lara); Noche criolla; Marimba/ Farolito; Mujer; Tu recuerdo y yo (by José Alfredo Jiménez); Sus ojos se cerraron (by Carlos Gardel); Cuesta abajo (by Carlos Gardel); Estrellita del sur (by Coronel Rueda); Ando muy borracho (by Cuco Sánchez); Ingrata pérfida (by Salvador Flores).
Review: Variety 1/6/54
Time: 127 minutes.

Plot: A triple part for Infante as the father and as his grown twin sons. Based on a Spanish work of the 16th Century.

Christmas Eve. Rafael, the father, needs money for his wife who's just given birth to twin boys. He sells his gun cheaply. Later he finds in the entry to a church the very ill baby that has been kidnapped from the rich Iturbide. The baby dies but not before infecting one of the twins. Rafael exchanges his own sick child for the dead baby so it will receive medical care and live. The man who bought Rafael's gun shoots and kills him in the cantina.

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:21 PM

Rafael, the son, grows up with his real mother María (Libertad Lamarque, "La Dama del Tango"), becomes a singer but has his career blocked by his mother's rejected suitor. Gabriel, the other twin (played by a clean shaven Infante), grows up spoiled and disagreeable with his rich adoptive father. After much melodrama, including the accidental shooting of María, the truth comes out, and all are reunited happily.

García Riera was unimpressed with "Infantes por todos lados" and thought rather than multiplied he was fragmented. Variety Magazine called it a "queer but engrossing story" and one of the best Mexican films of 1953. Variety also said that the movie was "clicko with distaffers" when it played three movie theaters in New York.

Pepe el Toro

1952
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: Pedro Infante; Joaquín Cordero; Amanda del Llano; Irma Dorantes; Fernando Soto Mantequilla; Armando Velasco; Pedro Elviro; Juan Orraca; Wolf Rubinski; Guillermo Hernández.
Songs: El Oso Carpintero; Costalitos de oro.
Awards: Rodríguez nominated for Ariel for best director; lost to Roberto Gavaldón for El niño y la niebla.
Infante nominated for Ariel for best actor; lost to Arturo de Córdova for Las tres perfectas casadas.
Freddy Fernández nominated for Ariel for best child actor; lost to Raúl Farell in Un divorcio.
Picture nominated for best editing.
Time:

Plot: Sequel to Nosotros los pobres, third and last of the series.

Infante suffers more problems of the poor and hard-working. His wife and twins from the last film have been killed in an auto accident. Just when he thinks his carpentry business is succeeding, it is closed by the authorities for bad debt (not his fault).

He goes into boxing to earn money but kills his opponent by accident.

Había una vez un marido
and
Sí . . . mi vida

 1952
Director: Fernando Méndez

Two cameo roles for Infante where he appears singing one song in each film.

1953

Reportaje

1953
Director: Emilio Fernández.
Cast: Arturo de Córdova (Bernardo); Roberto Cañedo; María Elena Marqués; Carmen Montejo; Miroslava; Esther Fernández; Columba Domínguez; Amanda del Llano; Carmen González; Irma Torres; Domingo Soler; Pedro Infante; Carmen Sevilla; Carlos López Moctezuma; Antonio Espin Clavillazo; Mercedes Barba; Germán Valdés Tin Tan; Lola Flores; Libertad Lamarque; Pedro Vargas; Fernando Soler; Luis Procuna; Pedro López Lagar; Joaquín Pardavé; Dolores del Río; María Félix; Jorge Negrete; Miguel Ferriz; Luis Aldás; Manolo Fábregas; Víctor Parra; Rafael Banquels; Beatriz Ramos; Tito Novaro; Rodolfo Landa; Víctor Manuel Mendoza; Miguel Torruco; José Elís Moreno; Julio Villarreal; Eduardo Noriego; Ernesto Alonso; César del Campo; Fernando Casanova; Crox Alvarado; José Angel Espinosa Ferrusquilla Agustín Fernández; Luis Aceves Casteñeda; Carlos Riquelme; Miguel Arenas; Lily Aclemar; Armando Silvestre; Arturo Soto Rangel; Manuel Noriega; Wolf Ruvinskis; Gilberto González; Carlos Orellana; Marcelo Chávez; Andres Soler; Rebeca Iturbide; Enrique Díaz Indiano; Maruja Grifell; Fanny Shiller; Jorge Casanova.
Music: Antonio Díaz Conde
Songs: La negra noche; Quiéreme mucho; La que se fue; La Adelita.
Review: Richard Item #3779
Awards: Nominated for Ariel for best sound.

Time: 103 minutes

Plot:
This film was made in benefit of la Periodistas Cinematográficos Asociados. All of the actors appeared without pay (only director Fernández demanding and receiving his regular salary). Almost all of the major stars of Mexico at that time appeared, with the notable exceptions of Cantinflas and Pedro Armendáriz.

New Year's Eve. Bernardo (Arturo de Córdova), owner of a daily newspaper, offers 10 thousand pesos to the reporter who brings in the best news. The movie is divided into seven episodes. Infante starred in the second.

Episode #1. A reporter takes his injured pregnant wife to the hospital. In the waiting room, a new father is furious that his new baby is a girl.

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:23 PM

Episode #2. A priest is informed that the rich Edmundo (Infante) is dying and needs confession. The priest arrives to find Edmundo hosting a party announcing his engagement. The priest thinks he's been tricked. He sees a photo of the man who came to the church, who turns out to be Edmundo's father who died many years before in a plane crash. The priest hears Edmundo's confession and shortly afterward Edmundo dies of a heat attack as announced from beyond the grave.

Episode #3. Comic skit in a police station with various characters passing through including a woman who says her servant stole and swallowed her diamond ring. They're put in a lockup for 12 hours to see what passes. Tin Tan plays a singer who accuses his partner of robbing his inspiration.

Episode #4. Taking place in an expensive cabaret. A man is called from his own home by a thief, claiming to be a victim of capitalism. He demands and receives the combination to the safe after threatening to use a blow torch.

Episode #5. Bernardo at home threatens to divorce his wife (Dolores del Rio) but when they discover they've both been faithful, they reconcile. (Look for the Diego Rivera painting of Dolores del Rio.)

Episode #6. In a hotel, actress María Félix is unable to sleep for the mariachis practicing next door. She storms over still in her night cream and argues with Jorge Negrete. The next day he discovers she's beautiful and falls in love. (Somewhat of an inside joke as the two mega-stars had hated each other since making "Peñon de los animos" together, Félix' first movie. At this time, only a year before Negrete's death, they had recently wed.)

Episode #7. Gabriela and her baby from the first episode are saved.

Over the final view of a newspaper press a voice gives homage to reporters but we never find out who wins the 10,000 pesos.

Gitana tienes que ser

1953
Director: Rafael Baledón
Cast: Pedro Infante; Carmen Sevilla; Estrellita Castro; Angel Garasa; Pedro de Aguillón.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Mosaico plaza de Garibaldi; La despreciativa; Que me toquen las golondrinas; La flor de tomillo; Piel canela; Guadalajara; Cielito lindo, huasteca; Cielito lindo; Mi Tenampa; Las Golondrinas; El Desinfle.
Time: 88 minutes

Plot: A joint production with Mexico and Spain.

The Spanish Gypsy singer Pastora (Sevilla) arrives in Mexico with her cousin, aunt and uncle. She is to film a movie with mariachi Pablo (Infante) as the lead. He meets her at the airport and they dislike each other immediately.

Later things begin to change after they sing at the Plaza Garibaldi. Just as Pedro tries to kiss her, photographers interrupt them and she thinks it was all for publicity. She leaves angrily.

After the filming of the movie is concluded, Pastora goes to the airport to return to Spain but Pablo stops her at the last minute and true love wins out.

1954

Cuidado con el amor

1954
Director: Miguel Zacarías
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Salvador Allende); Elsa Aguirre; Oscar Pulido; Eulalio González; Arturo Soto Rangel; Emma Roldán.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Cien Años; Si tú me quisieras; Serenata Huasteca (by José Alfredo Jiménez); Ifigeño el sombrerudo; Corrido de Agustín Jaime; Cocula; Ay, Jalisco no te rajes!
Review: Variety 1/19/55
Time: 102 minutes.

Plot: In this big box office hit, Infante plays Salvador Allende, a young rancher from Sinaloa. He leaves home to travel the world with a letter of recommendation from his father to two old friends in Jalisco. The two, Felipe and Seragín, turn out to be gamblers and carousers.

(To be completed soon.)

El mil amores

1954
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Bibiano Villarreal); Rosita Quintanta; Joaquín Pardavé; Liliana Durán.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Contigo a la distancia; Canción de año nuevo; Bienvenida al capitán; El mil amores (by Cuco Sánchez); El músico de cuerda (by Cuco Sánchez); Tres consejos; De pies a cabeza.
Time: 100 minutes.

Plot:

Comedy. Carmen (Quintana) sell her house to the rich ranchers Bibiano (Infante) and Chabela (Pardavé). She ask Bibiano to help her by passing as her husband for the sake of her daughter Patricia, who is away in a girls' school. (The real father was a bigamist who abandoned them). In return Carmen has to pass as Bibiano's sister in front of Bibiano's insufferable future mother-in-law. Bibiano's girlfriend and her mother turn out to be gold diggers and after many misadventures, Bibiano and Carmen declare their love for each other.

This is a re-make of the 1942 Argentine film El tercer beso.

Escuela de vagabundos

1954
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante; Miroslava; Blanca de Castejón; Oscar Pulido; Annabelle Gutiérrez; Fernando Casanova; Liliana Durán.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Cucurrucucú paloma (Tomás Méndez); Adios Lucrecia; Quién Será (Pablo Beltrán Ruiz); Grito prisionero (Gabriel Luna de la Fuente); Nana Pancha (Estela de José); Dumont y Lucrecia (Trío aguileño).
Review: Variety 4/13/55; Richard Item #3892
Time: 98 minutes.

Plot:

The rich Miguel, his wife Emilia, and two daughters Susi (Miroslava, the beautiful Czechoslovakian actress), and Lala. When the vagrant José Antonio (Infante) shows up looking for a phone, he's taken in by Emilia and made a chauffeur. Susi is very hostile to him (Guess who's going to fall in love). While driving her to the Country Club, he has an accident with Mauricio, her suitor.

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:26 PM

At the party, the girls flock to José Antonio, which arouses Susi's jealousy and Mauricio's anger. José unsuccessfully tries to win over Susi by serenading her.

Patricia, the daughter of Vértiz, has become infatuated with José Antonio. As she is the daughter of Vértiz, with whom Miguel is trying to close a business deal, José is treated as an important member of the family. They then discover José Antonio is a famous composer after he disappears. When the news comes that he's been killed in a car accident, Susi faints. When he shows up alive and well, the family faints. Susi and José Antonio declare their love.

This big box office hit is essentially a re-make of My Man Godfrey. García Riera states that it was directed with "buen ritmo, gran vivacidad, and algún estruendo." ("good pacing, great vitality, and a lot of noise.")

La vida no vale nada

1954
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante; Rosario Granados; Lilia Prado; Domingo Soler; Magda Guzmán; Wolf Ruvinskis; Hortensia Santoveña
Based on a story by Gorky: Malva and Los amansadores.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: El Capiro (Sergio Velázquez); Tren sin pasajeros (Tomás Méndez); Alma (Chucho Monge); Fallaste corazón (Cuco Sánchez); Camino de Guanajuato (José Alfredo Jiménez).
Awards: Infante won Ariel for best actor.
Magda Gúzman nominated for Ariel for "mejor papel de cuadro feminino."
Time: 100 minutes

Plot:

Also called La canción del aire. Tragicomedy based on two stories by Maxim Gorky, "Malva," and "Los amansadores."

Infante's character is best described by García Riera: "Un sujeto de origen campesino, buen trabajador, cantante y simpático . . . afligido por un fondo melancólico, un espíritu de frustración que lo lleva a una vide nómada, desesperenzada, y unas borracheras épicas." (A character of campesino origins, a good worker, singer and simpático . . . suffering from a melancholy nature, a spirit of frustration that leads him into a nomadic life, hopelessness, and epic drunken sprees."

Pablo (Infante) goes to the capital where he knows no one and obtains a job as a laborer. A widow, Cruz (Granados) gives him a job in her antique shop, that he makes prosper. She keeps him on even after the priest demands that he be dismissed. She falls in love with him, but after he gets drunk on her saint day, he resumes his errant ways.

Pablo defends a prostitute Silvia (Guzmán) in a bar and then earns enough money as a baker to free her from the brothel. She too falls in love with him but spits in his face when she realizes he only pities her.

Pablo returns to the countryside to find his mother and siblings living in poverty because the father, Leandro (Soler), has deserted them to live on the coast. Pablo works to support the family and after altercations with his father over a woman, Marta (Prado), finally obligates his father to return home.

Pueblo, canto y esperanza

1954
Director: Julián Soler (Cuban story); Alfredo B. Crevenna (Colombian story); Rogelio A. González (Mexican story)
Cast (Cuba): Joaquín Pardavé; Carlos Pous; Juan José Laboriel; Humbuerto Rodríguez;.
Cast (Colombia): Roberto Cañedo; Columba Domíguez; Víctor Manuel Mendoza; Héctor Mateos
Cast (Mexico): Pedro Infante; Rita Macedo; Charles Rooner (El Mister); Armando Velasco; José Muñoz; Julio Ahuet; Chel López.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Marchita el alma (Manuel M. Ponce) and many more.
Time: 110 minutes.

Plot: Three part picture undertaking the folklore of Cuba, Colombia and Mexico through local stories. Infante is in the Mexican segment which is a simple rural tale of honor and love.

Los Gavilanes

1954
Director: Vicente Oroná
Story: Aurora Brillas del Moral; adapted by Julio Cahero
Photography: Agustín Oroná
Cast: Pedro Infante (Juan Menchaca); Lilia Prado (Rosaura, novia of Roberto); Angélica María (orphan child Florecita); Ana Bertha Lepe (Rosa María, novia of Juan); Angel Infante (Roberto); José Elías Moreno (Gorila, bandit); Hortensia Santoveña (Marina, the mother); José Baviera (don Bernardo, the hacendado); Eulalio Gonz;ález Piporro; Wolf Ruvinskis (Rómulo, bandit); Federio Curiel Pichirilo (Perico, bandit); José Eduardo Pérez (capitán, bandit); Pascual Garcíz Peña (Pancho); Mario Dantino; Yolanda Ortiz; José Chávez Trowe (José María, father); Manuel Dondé; Magda Donato; Victorio Blanco; Guillermo Álvarez Bianchi; Manuel Vergara Manver; Vítor Jordan; Paco Crow; Jorge Rachini. Moreno;
Music: Manuel Esperón
Time: 102 minutes.
Songs: Rosa María (sung by Infante); El Patito (sung by Florecita); Los Gavilanes (two versions: sung by Infante and Los Dos Reales); Eterno Dios or Ruego a Dios (sung by Infante); Llora conmigo, guitarra mía/Noches negras (Infante); Deja (Infante)
Filmed in the Hacienda "La Puente"

Plot: Rural melodrama pre-revolutionary Robin Hood confusion of paternity.

Men assault the ranch of José María, wound him and kidnap one of his small sons. Before dying, he makes his wife, Mariana, swear that his other son, Juan, never find out that he is not his son but the son of another father.

Juan (Pedro Infante), now grown, works on the hacienda of don Bernardo and his son, Roberto (Angel Infante).

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:28 PM

Roberto waylays and tries to rape Rosa María (fiancé of Juan) but she grabs his knife and stabs herself rather than submit. (Why didn't she kill him? Of course, it allows Roberto to be "responsible" for her death without actually murdering her.) Before she dies, she tells Juan who is responsible. Juan swears revenge. When the rurales police arrive, Juan's mother hides the knife and refuses to produce the evidence to save him.

The police arrest Juan who escapes and becomes the leader of a Robin Hood band known as "Los Gavilanes" (chicken hawks). ("No es verguenza ser bandido si se robo que es ladron"). They assault the hacienda of don Bernardo and kidnap Roberto's fiancé, Rosaura, for revenge. Juan attempts to rape her but his conscience prevents him. Juan protects her from anyone else in the band from molesting her. She falls in love with him.

The band adopts a little girl, Forecita, whose parents have been murdered. Roberto uses Florecita to try to lure Juan to ambush and kill him. Juan proposes a duel to get the child out of danger. Before Juan can finish off the injured Roberto, Mariana and don Bernardo arrive and Mariana clarifies all: Bernardo's men kidnapped the wrong son, Roberto, the son of José María. Juan is the real son of the hacendado. Juan and Roberto give up to the authorities. Rosaura promises to wait for Juan. Mariana promises to take care of Florecita. Don Bernardo promised to be good to his campesinos.

1955

Escuela de música

1955
Director: Miguel Zacarías
Cast: Libertad Lamarque; Pedro Infante; Luis Aldás; Georgina Barragán; María Chacón; Eulalio González Pipporro; Humberto Rodríguez.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Lamento jarocho (Agustín Lara); La cumbancha (Agustín Lara); Esstrrellita (Manueel M. Ponce); Guadalajara (Pepe Guízar); Ella (José Alfredo Jiménez); Corrido de Monterrey (Severiano Briseño); Nocturnal (José Sabre Marroquín); Brasil (Ary Barroso); Cha Cha Chabela (Luis Demetrio); Lamento borincano (Rafael Hernándea); El manicero (Pedro Elías Gutiérrez and F. Abreu); Alma llanera (Pedro Elías Gutiérrez and F. Abreu); A medio luz.
Review: Variety 3/28/56
Time: 87 minutes.

Plot: Libertad Lamarque plays the director of an orchestra.

(To be completed soon.)

La tercera palabra

1955
Director: Julián Soler
Cast: Pedro Infante; Margo López; Sara García; Preudencia Grifell; Rodolfo Landa.
Music: Gustavo César Carrión
Songs: La verdolaga (Rubén Fuentes and Alberto Cervantes); Yo soy quien soy (Manuel Esperón and Felipe Bermejo); Arrejúntate prietita (Manuel Esperón and Felipe Bermejo)
Review: Variety 12/5/56
Awards: Sara García won Ariel for best actress.
Time: 95 minutes

Plot: Variety was very laudatory of this "offbeat story" of a "grownup nature boy" on a prosperous Mexican ranch and notes Infante's singing five songs is "standout."

A young teacher, Margarita (played by the "Argentinian brunette looker" (Variety) (López), is hired by two aging sisters to educate their nephew. When Margarita arrives she discovers the "child" is 28 year old Pablo (Infante), who was taken to the countryside in his youth by his father after the mother abandoned the family.

Margarita teaches Pablo to read and he teaches her to ride a horse and hunt. She helps him defend his inheritance against two unscrupulous relatives who want to declare him insane. Pablo rejects Margarita when he discovers she had previously been seduced by the relatives' lawyer. She flees to the woods and he pursues her having regretted his rejection.

El Inocente

1955
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante; Silvia Pinal; Sara García; Oscar Ortiz de Pinedo; Armando Sáenz; Félix González; Maruja Grifell; Pedro de Aguillón; Antonio Bravo; Lupe Andrade.
El Trío Samperio as the "Mecánicos".
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Mi último fracaso (Alfredo Gil); Juegos infantiles (Trío Avileño); La verdolaga (Rubén Fuentes); No volveré (Manuel Esperón y Ernesto Cortázar).
Time: 94 minutes.

Plot: Comedy. A young woman, Mané (Pinal), travelling to visit her rich parents in Cuernavaca has her car break down. The mechanic Cruci (Infante) cannot repair the car that night and offers to take her home on his motorcycle. As it is New Year's Eve, they spend the night drinking, singing, and dancing. They end up drunk and sleeping side by side, although innocently. Discovered by her parents and brother, they are forced to marry in a civil ceremony for appearances (civil so they can later divorce, her reputation saved). After various adventures and spats they of course fall in love.

Pablo y Carolina

1955
Director: Mauricio de la Serna
Cast: Pedro Infante; Irasema Dilián; Alejandro Ciangherotti; Eduardo Alcaraz; Miguel Angel Ferriz.
Music: Manuel Esperón
Songs: Te amaré, vida mía (Cuco Sánchez): Las tres hermanas (Ramiro Hernández); A la orilla del mar (Manuel Esperón y Felipe Bermejo); El muchacho alegre; Corrido de Monterrey.
Time: 96 minutes

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cont... April 13, 2005 6:30 PM

Plot: Comedy. Carolina is a student at the Instituto de Cien Primaveras (100 Springs Academy), a school to shape young girls into perfect wives. In Carolina's "Business Letters" class, she writes a letter to her "ideal love," Pablo. The letter ends up in Monterrey in the hands of Pablo Garza, a beer factory industrialist and porfirista. He passes it to his son, also a Pablo, a maderista, who in turn passes it to his son, another Pablo (Infante) who is "moderno." The latter's finacé finds the letter and cancels the wedding.

Pablo travels to Mexico City to find this Carolina for an explanation. He arrives during a school festival when Carolina is disguised as a cadet, and passes herself off as her own brother. This leads to confusing situations, mistaken identities (and genders), all eventually clarified and leading to declarations of love.

1956

Tizoc (amor indio)

1956
Director: Ismael Rodríguez
Cast: María Félix; Pedro Infante (as Tizoc); Eduardo Fajardo; Julio Aldama; Alicia del Lago; Andrés Soler.
Music: Raúl Lavista
Photography: Alex Phillips
Songs: Ave María; Te quiero más que a mis ojos; Pocito de Nacaguina.
Reviewed: Variety (9/11/57)
Awards: Infante named best actor, Berlin Festival, 1957
Ariel, best picture, 1958
Ariel, best actor, Pedro Infante, 1958
Ariel, best music, Raúl Lavista
Alicia del Lago nominated for Ariel for best actress, lost to Rosa María Moreno for "La culta dama"
Julio Aldama nominated for Ariel for "papel de cuadro masculino"; lost to Roberto Rodríguez for "El buen ladrón"
Alex Phillips nominated for Ariel for photography
Time: 110 minutes.

Plot: Previously called La virgen de Tizoc. Inspired by Tierra Baja and Tabaré of literature.

Variety Magazine praised the Pathe color photography as "breathtakingly beautiful," noted Pedro Infante was a "plus" and that the film would be "remembered for a while."

The story is about the Indian Tizoc (Infante) who falls passionately in love with a white girl (Félix) whom he mistakes for the Virgin Mary. He thinks that she has agreed to marry him when she hands him her handkerchief (a symbol of commitment in his culture). The story, of course, ends tragically for all involved with the girl accidentally killed and Tizoc committing suicide with the same arrow so that their souls can enter two doves and continue to sing to "Tata Dios." García Riera thought the role was ridiculous and the worst of Infante's admirable career and that the Berlin Festival jury must have had a tourist's taste for the exotic.

Escuela de rateros

1956
Director: Rogelio A. González
Cast: Pedro Infante (as Victor Valdés/Raúl Cuesta Hernández); Yolanda Varela; Rosita Arenas; Rosa Elena Durgel; Eduardo Fajardo
Music: Sergio Guerrero
Songs: Te quiero así; Agarraron al ladrón; El jamaiquino; El volador; Rapsodia para piano.
Time: 95 minutes.

Plot: Comedy. Víctor (Infante), a "sinverguenza" actor, is blackmailed by an old associate, Eduardo, an Argentinian jewel thief. Víctor tries to phone the police to denounce him but Víctor is shot to death while on the phone. The police use a look-alike bread delivery man, Raúl (also Infante), to catch Eduardo. This provides the opportunity for numerous mistaken identities and misadventures. Ultimately Raúl helps capture the jewel thief, receives the reward, and marries the girl Víctor had been blackmailing.

García Riera thought "Todo funcionó de modo admirable" in Infante's last movie role.

Pedro Infante had several movie projects planned at his death. These included:

La tijera de Oro (The Golden Scissors) with a script by Luis Alcoriza. Infante would have played a barber.

Ando volando bajo (Low Flying) set to be filmed in 1957 and directed by Rogelio A. González. This film was to re-unite Infante with Luis Aguilar and Lilia Prado. This film was later made with Aguilar in the Infante part and with Pedro Arméndariz

El museo de cera (Wax Museum) to be directed by Ismael Rodríguez. Infante would have played seven parts in this film including an insane hunchback curator of the museum and various historical characters including Juan Diego, Benito Juárez, Cuauhtémoc and Pancho Villa. The ending was to have shown all seven characters gathered around the curator's death bed singing in unison.

 There was also reportedly discussions for Infante to make his first American movie to be started in 1958. It was to be made for Universal with Tab Hunter with the working title of El charro y el cowboy.

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A tribute April 13, 2005 6:33 PM

Pedro Infante A Tribute to Pedro Infante
By Raymundo Eli Rojas

Pedro Infante Cruz, was born in Guamuchil,Sinaloa, on December 17, 1917. He worked as a carpenter from a young age, though his interest in music led him to make his own guitar, a labor that took two years.


In 1937, Pedro Infante sang for the first time in public at a local festival in Sinaloa. His first wife, Maria Luisa Leon, convinced him to move to the capital to try his luck. In Mexico City, he was given the opportunity to act for the radio Station XEB, though only making a modest sum. While there, he also performed in concert halls, interpreting the songs of Alberto Cervantes, Jose Alfredo Jimenez, Cuco Sanchez, Tomas Mendez, Ruben Fuentes, Salvador Flores, and many more. From that point, he was to go on to record more than two-hundred albums, his first --El Soldado Raso--which he recorded on November 19, 1943 on the Peerless label. Some of his songs include La Que Se Fue, El Durazno, Dulce Patria, Maldita Sea Mi Suerte, Asi Es La Vida, Manana Rosalia, Cartas a Eufemia, Flor Sin Retono, and a multitude of others.

His movie career began in 1942 with the movie La Feria de Las Flores. He then went on to star in Jesucita en Chihuahua, Sobre Las Olas, Gavilan Pollero, and La Oveja Negra among many others. He made Los Tres Garcia, its sequel Vuelven Los Garcia, El Inocente, and Dicen Que Soy Mujeriego with Sara Garcia. With Marga Lopez, he made Un Rincon Cerca Del Cielo and its sequel Ahora Soy Rico. Antonio Badu and Infante made the hilarious comedies Los Hijos de Maria Morales and El Gavilan Pollero. Infante also brought us the memorable character of Pepe "El Toro," in the movies Nosotros Los Pobres, Ustedes Los Ricos, and Pepe, El Toro.

In 1947, Pedro Infante was involved in the first of three airplane accidents that he would have in his life. However, his love of flying kept him going back into the air. In 1949, he was involved in another plane crash near Zitacuaro, Michoacan. He suffered serious injury to his head and the situation looked grave. After a successful three hour surgery and many hours of praying, the Mexican people could breathe a sigh of relief. Following some rehabilitation, he went on to make more movies like A Toda Maquina and its sequel Que Te Ha Dado Esa Mujer with Luis Aguilar "El Gallo Giro," in which they played two motorcycle cops riding American Harley Davidson motorcycles. Infante also did a tour of the United States, concentrating on New York and Texas. In 1951 he, Sarita Montiel, and the hilarious actor and singer Lalo Gonzalez "El Piporro" came out with the movie Ahi Viene Martin Corona and its sequel El Enamorado.

History was made in 1952, when the two idolos of Mexico, Pedro Infante and Jorge Negrete starred together in the comedy Dos Tipos de Cuidado. In 1955, Pedro Infante sang for the famous radio station XEW, taking part in the popular program Asi Es Mi Tierra. During one of his many tours of South America, he received the Medalla de Oro Simon Bolivar (Gold Medal of Simon Bolivar) from the president of Venezuela, becoming the first foreigner to receive that award. During this time he also did more tours of the United States, this time concentrating in California. There had always been friendship and friendly rivalry between Pedro Infante and Jorge Negrete. When Negrete died in 1953, the throne that was shared was left solely to Infante. The news of his death, though, brought him great sadness. During the funeral procession for his friend, Infante rode his famous Harley Davidson motorcycle as an escort.

In 1956, Infante starred with Maria Felix in a movie in color called Tizoc and also made his final movie Escuela Para Rateros. Planned were more movies and he was in the process of making another. Also planned were some appearances in some American movies with Marlon Brando, John Wayne, Kirk Douglas, Joan Crawford, among others. In July of 1956, the Academy of Cinemagraphic Science & Art of Mexico presented Pedro Infante with the Aerial Award for his movie La Vida No Vale Nada.

On April 15th of 1957, Infante woke up early and rode his Harley Davidson motorcycle to the airport. His love of flying brought about his death that day. He was killed in a plane crash near Merida, Yucatan. At 11:15, Manuel Bernal, of the radio station XEW, announced, "Ha muerto Pedro Infante" ("Pedro Infante has died.") Newspaper headlines read: "Pedro Infante Perished Yesterday in an Airplane he Co-Piloted," and "Astonishment, Mourning, and Pain from the Death of an Actor."

That day, forty years ago, was declared a national day of mourning in Mexico. All the radio and television stations of Mexico gave programs in homage to their idolo, practically playing Infante's songs all day. When his coffin arrived in Mexico City, a multitude descended on the airport. At the National Association of Actors and Composers in the Jorge Negrete Theater, his body was placed so that his people could pay homage. There, mariachis bid farewell with Amorcito Corazon, the bolero he had made so famous. At the XEW a plaque was put up in studio four, in commemoration of the last place Infante sang in the Asi Es Mi Tierra program.

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cont April 13, 2005 6:34 PM

In many households on Sunday afternoons, one can find people watching the old Pedro Infante movies. His recording of Tu, Solo Tu which is probably the best rendition of that song, came out in the movie soundtrack of Mi Familia/My Family. His songs ranged from valses, cha-cha-cha's, boleros, and canciones rancheras. He was accompanied by the great musical ensembles of that time like El Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan, El Orquesta de Pedro Garcia, El Orquesta de Noe Fajardo, Trio Claveras, Andres Huesca y sus Constenos, and the guitar playing of Antonio Bisbiesca.

He brought the bolero ranchero, into prominent use by mariachis and ranchera singers, as seen in the singing Javier Solis, Juan Mendoza "El Tariacuri", and Marco Antonio Muniz. In the styles of many singers today, one can find Pedro Infante's style in their voices. Pedro Infante has not been forgotten. Though he made millions, he always represented the common poor carpenter he once was. Infante was a symbol of someone who had worked himself up from nothing. To many Latin Americans, he wasn't just an actor and singer, but much, much more. Forty years have done nothing to erase his influence and to this day, flowers are taken to his grave.

Ray Rojas is an Anthropology/Linguistics major at the University of Texas at El Paso writes on many topics of Ethnomusiclogy. He began playing mariachi in high school and has been reseaching and writing on the topic of present day mariachi and its roots.
This page was designed and created by S. A. Vega
Used by Permission.© Fiesta Del Mariachi

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Discografía of PedroInfante April 13, 2005 6:54 PM

http://lonestar.utsa.edu/rlwilson/disco.html

http://lonestar.utsa.edu/rlwilson/disco2.html

http://lonestar.utsa.edu/rlwilson/disco3.html

http://lonestar.utsa.edu/rlwilson/disco4.html

Singer, actor, icon, idol. More than 40 years after his death in a plane crash, Pedro Infante is still widely popular.

Rita Lynn Wilson/
Xicotencatl Fernández
University of Texas at San Antonio
rlwilson@lonestar.utsa.edu

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Pedro Infante..uno de mis favoritos April 13, 2005 9:05 PM

Teresa , tu como siempre de "especial", siempre he admirado a Pedro  Infante, esas fotos estan de maravilla, gracias Teresa.

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I bet he was a hit a the box office... May 11, 2005 7:52 AM

nice- topic!  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Gracias Juan y Jeffrey May 11, 2005 9:23 AM

Yes, Pedro Infante was a Mexican Idol, he left a lot of broken hearts when he died, I think people that die young always leave that taste of inmortality.  [ send green star]
 
 May 24, 2007 5:31 PM

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pedro infante -ave maria June 09, 2007 4:09 PM

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 June 09, 2007 10:56 PM

I just love this thread Tere, wonderful information on Pedro Infante


Myspace Graphics
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anonymous  June 09, 2007 11:48 PM

VIVA PEDRO!!!!!!!!!.....excellent threads......bravo!!!!!!!!!!!  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
 June 10, 2007 6:03 PM

Thanks Blanca and Mike

and glad you enjoyed this topic, it´s very important for people from other countries to know more about Mexican Icons.

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