START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
Jul 8, 2013

Critical Introduction to the Old Testament

 

A book of the Torah  (Genesis - with ref. to Deuteronomy)

 

A discussion is presented of the historical background, literary analysis,

and theological message of Genesis in the Old Testament.

 

PENTATEUCH: The revelation of God in creation and the founding of the

Israelite nation, as presented in selected passages of Genesis through

Deuteronomy.

 

No one who desires to gain a comprehensive knowledge of the Old Testament

for preaching and teaching can live without a good Introduction of the Old

Testament. There are several introductions to the Old Testament on the

market today, and selecting one is not an easy task.

 

The problem with recommending a good introduction hinges on the fact that

all of them take a different approach. The ideal introduction for pastors

would be one that gives a historical and theological introduction to each

book of the Old Testament, without majoring on critical and literary

issues.

 

Raymond B. Dillard and Tremper Longman III, An

Introduction to the Old Testament (Grand Rapids: Zondervan Publishing

House, 1994) takes an evangelical, conservative approach to the Old

Testament while trying to maintain a balance between scholarly issues and

practical application.

 

Several distinctives sets Dillard and Longman's Introduction to the Old

Testament  apart from other introductions to the Old Testament: It is

thoroughly evangelical in its perspective. It emphasizes "special

introduction" -- the study of individual books. It interacts in an irenic

spirit with the historical-critical method. It features high points of

research history and representative scholars rather than an exhaustive

treatment of past scholarship. It deals with the meaning of each book not

in isolation, but in a canonical context. It probes the meaning of each

book in the setting of its culture. With an eye on understanding the

nature of Old Testament historiography, An Introduction to the Old

Testament offers the reader a solid understanding of three key issues:

historical background, literary analysis, and theological message.

 

Genesis.  Genesis is not only the first book of the Bible, it is

critical for understanding both the Old and New Testaments.  Read

Dillard and Longman, pp. 37-56.

 

Deuteronomy.  The book reiterates Israel's standing before Yahweh

for the second generation and creates the setting for entrance

into the sworn land of Canaan.  Read Dillard and Longman, pp.

91-106.

 

Old Testament Introduction introduces every book of the Old Testament in a

general way. Issues such as composition, authorship, date, historical and

cultural background, and geographical setting give  a holistic

understanding of the Old Testament and the study thereof.

 

Goals are to deepen familiarity with Old Testament literature, to acquaint

 with some mainstream approaches to Old Testament study, to give the

students a deeper understanding of the historical,

geographical, and cultural background of the Old Testament and its books,

to enable clarify  own positions concerning problems and solutions in the

Old Testament and its study, whereby enabling: identify events of the Old

Testament with reference to the Ancient Near East, place each book of the

Old Testament in its (supposedly) right time period and give a summary of

what distinguished that period, summarize very briefly the contents of

each Old Testament book, describe the major conjunctions in the history of

Israel as a nation, give an account of their view on the inspiration of

the Old Testament and its relation to history, relate important facts to

the compilation and canonization of the Old Testament, present their own

reflected position about the relationship of the Old Testament to the New

Testament.

 

Here is the point. Once Abraham or David was given his grant, it could not

be taken away. But since these grants included promises regarding future

generations (seed), and since these grants were rewards based on the

faithfulness of the initial recipient, how can the blessings (rewards) of

the grant accrue to future generations if they are unfaithful? The answer

is that they cannot. Isaac illustrates this principle in Genesis 26.

Abraham has died. Now God appears to Isaac and challenges him to future

obedience: Do not go to Egypt. God promises Isaac that He will confirm or

establish the oath He swore to his father Abraham if only Isaac will be

obedient to stay in the land. Isaac was faithful, so the promises of the

grant continued to flow through him.

 

Likewise, God appeared to Jacob in a dream. Jacob was going back to Haran

to get a wife, the very place from which Abraham had come. God tells him

that the promise given to his grandfather Abraham can only be fulfilled in

Palestine. Thus in Gen 31:3 he tells Jacob to return. For the land

blessings to flow through Jacob he had to be obedient to Godís command.

This same principle of obedience in order to possess the land can be

traced right on through the Palestinian Covenant to the ultimate remnant

that will possess the borders of the land grant originally promised to

Abraham. No generation of Jews has yet had the faith necessary to fully

possess the land promised in the Palestinian Covenant (Deut 30:1-10). The

promise to Abraham still holds; but God is waiting for a faithful

generation to inherit the promise.

 

This aspect of the grant given to Abraham will come to pass. The Davidic

grant in 2 Samuel 7 picks up on the seed aspect of the Abrahamic Covenant.

For all David knew, Solomon would be the one to establish the Davidic

throne forever. But Solomon was not capable of being the one to fulfill

the everlasting nature of this grant. He was not found faithful (1 Kgs

11:11, 35). The royal grant given to David would await a faithful seed

worthy of everlasting rule. This principle of a ìfaithful generationî

required for the fulfillment of the future aspects of the royal grants is

a crucial link in connecting Jesus with the fulfillment of both the

Abrahamic and Davidic Covenants. The rewards of the grants would not be

realized by an unfaithful generation, or by an unfaithful ruler.

 

And so, just as Israel was looking for an ideal king to be their Messiah,

Yahweh was looking for an ideal generation that would be faithful to the

stipulations of the Mosaic Covenant (the suzerainty-vassal covenant).

Through such a generation He could fulfill the promises to Abraham, Isaac,

and Jacob. He could fulfill the Abrahamic Covenant (the covenant of

grant). But what happened to unfaithful generations?

 

An understanding of the grants may be helpful here as well. Unfaithfulness

on the part of a vassal did not nullify the covenant relationship in a

suzerainty-vassal covenant. The suzerain sovereignly initiated the

relationship, and he maintained it as well. This is the argument of God

throughout Hosea, as well as in Romans 9-11 and many other passages. The

fidelity of the vassal did not determine the duration of the covenant.

What, then, did a suzerain do to an unfaithful vassal? Customarily, he

chose from among three different options: (1) he could invoke the curses

of the covenant; [12] (2) he could declare holy war on the vassal; [13]

and (3) he could draw up a new covenant.[14] Implicit in all three

disciplinary options was the loss of any royal grants that may have been

incorporated with the suzerainty-vassal treaty, like incentive clauses. If

a grant (by definition) only went to faithful vassals, it is obvious that

the unfaithful vassal was not a candidate for a grant. In other words, he

lost his reward. The suzerainty-vassal treaty (or a new one) was still in

effect, but the bonuses contained in the incentive clauses (covenants of

grant) would not be given. Thus the danger lying before an unfaithful

vassal was both temporal discipline (heavier taxes, stipulations, or even

death) as well as loss of reward (royal grant).

 

From this discussion of covenants it can be seen that when John the

Baptist and Jesus began their ministries, God was looking for a faithful

generation. But if the Jewish generation living during the first century

A.D. were going to be faithful, it had to repent. This call to repentance

for them as a nation or generation of Jews was really no different than

Godís call to them in prior centuries. And this leads us to a discussion

of repentance in the OT.

 

The call to repentance in the OT, if there was such a call,[20] was to a

nation already in covenant

relationship with Yahweh. They were viewed as married or as the children

of a loving Father (Jer 31:3, 9). The turning summoned by the prophets was

a return to fellowship with a God with whom they already had a

relationship. Failure to return to the Lord would bring temporal judgment.

Deuteronomy 4:23-31 sets the stage:

 

Take heed to yourselves, lest you forget the covenant of the Lord your God

which He made with you, and make for yourselves a carved image in the form

of anything which the Lord your God has forbidden you. For the Lord your

God is a consuming fire, a jealous God you will soon utterly perish from

the land which you cross over the Jordan to possess; you will not prolong

your days in it, but will be utterly destroyed But from there you will

seek the Lord your God, and you will find Him if you seek Him with all

your heart and with all your soul. When you are in distress, and all these

things come upon you in the latter days, when you turn [shuÑb] to the Lord

your God and obey His voice (for the Lord your God is a merciful God), He

will not forsake you nor destroy you, nor forget the covenant of your

fathers which He swore to them.

 

Note the features of this passage: 1) God's faithfulness to the covenant

of the fathers (the Abrahamic Covenant, that is, the covenant of grant)

despite the unfaithfulness of succeeding generations to the Mosaic

Covenant, the suzerainty-vassal covenant; 2) the wrath of God which is

described as a consuming fire; 3) the temporal nature of the judgment; 4)

a judgment that would destroy physical lives and scatter the Jews among

the nations; and 5) the compassion of the Lord in the latter days toward

the generation which returns to Him and seeks Him with their whole heart.

 

It is interesting that the only uses of shuÑb in the Pentateuch which

refer to Israelís (or anyone's) turning to the Lord are in the passage

just cited and Deut 30:1-10 (the Palestinian Covenant), where it is said

that the Jews can return to Yahweh from being scattered among the nations

if they do so with all their heart and soul. Thus, it can be concluded

that the appeal to Israel to return to the Lord in the OT is an appeal to

turn away from her infidelity to the Mosaic Covenant and to seek the Lord

with her heart and soul. It is a call for fellowship, not relationship.

Infidelity to the covenant evokes Godís temporal wrath, but not His

eternal judgment. Though individuals in the nation may undergo eternal

judgment for lack of faith, the nation as a whole will never face eternal

judgment.

 

A book of the Former Prophets  (Joshua)

 

Joshua being first book of former prophets describes the conquest and

settlement of Canaan. Read Dillard and Longman, pp. 107-118

 

OBJECTIVES: able to outline and explain the major viewpoints on

introductory issues of the various Old Testament books. These would

include authorship, date, historical background, and message of each book,

able to trace the development of the different views and methods of

approaching the Old Testament, be familiar with representative scholars

from the various modern views toward the Old Testament, able to apply the

general principles of introduction to the understanding of particular

books. Joshua.  This first book of the Former Prophets describes the

conquest and settlement of Canaan.  Read Dillard and Longman, pp.

107-118.

 

Old Testament Introduction introduces every book of the Old Testament in

ageneral way. Issues such as

composition, authorship, date, historical and cultural background,

andgeographical setting give a holistic understanding of the Old Testament

and the study thereof to deepen familiarity with Old Testament literature,

to acquaint with some mainstream approaches to Old Testament study, to

give  a deeper understanding of the historical, geographical and

cultural background of the Old Testament and its books, to enable clarify

own positions concerning problems and solutions in Old Testament and its

study. Upon the successful completion should be able to identify events of

the Old Testament with reference to the Ancient Near East, place each book

of the Old Testament in its (supposedly) right time period and give

asummary of what distinguished that period, summarize very briefly the

contents of each Old Testament book, describe the major conjunctions in

the history of Israel as a nation, give an account of their view on the

inspiration of the Old Testament and its relation to history, relate

important facts to the compilation and canonization of the Old Testament,

present reflected position about the relationship of the Old Testament to

the New Testament.

 

Synopsis: This companion textbook to Carson, Moo, and Morris's acclaimed

"Introduction to the New Testament" puts intellectual muscle into Old

Testament study.

Description: Several distinctives set this volume apart from other

introductions to the Old Testament:

• It is thoroughly evangelical in its perspective.

• It emphasizes "special introduction"—the study of individual books. • It

interacts in an irenic spirit with the historical-critical method. • It

features high points of research history and representative scholars

rather than an exhaustive treatment of past scholarship.

• It deals with the meaning of each book, not in isolation but in a

canonical context.

• It probes the meaning of each book in the setting of its culture. With

an eye on understanding the nature of the Old Testament

historiography, An Introduction to the Old Testament offers the reader a

solid understanding of three key issues: historical background, literary

analysis, and theological message.

 

.   A BROAD INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORICAL BOOKS:

     A.   A Recurring View of History based upon YHWH's

          covenants:

          1.   Western view of history is primarily linear as it

               traces events in a chronological line from A to Z

               with cause and effect viewed in naturalistic terms

          2.   An Ancient Near Eastern view of history is

               primarily cyclic (often around the regular cycle

               of seasons) with cause and effect viewed in

               supernatural terms

          3.   The Ancient Near Eastern neighbors of Israel

               sought to direct (or control) their historical

               cycles of destiny by the recitation of appropriate

               incantations or omens

          4.   Israel was forbidden in their Law to practice

               divination, omens, and incantations, therefore,

               they sought to direct (or control) their history

               by conforming to their covenant with YHWH

          5.   Therefore theology and history merged for Israel

               through the covenants of YHWH, and the historical

               books unfold YHWH's sovereign, covenant work in

               history:

               a.   Cause and effect are understood in view of

                    God's covenant response to human activities

                    and decisions:

                    1)   Note the cycles of Judges

                    2)   Note the apostasy in the books of Kings

               b.   In particular, the Abrahamic and Mosaic

                    covenants explain YHWH's sovereign unfolding

                    of history for Israel

     B.   The Theology of the Historical Books is

          Deuteronomistic:

          1.   The concept of a Deuteronomistic History was a

               development of the earlier source-critical

               approach to the Pentateuch (JEDP), but first found

               its detailed expression in 1943 by Martin Noth in

               his work The Deuteronomistic History (Sheffield,

               England: JSOT, 1981)

          2.   A classic Deuteronomistic History would affirm

               that the historical books of Deuteronomy--2 Kings

               were the editorial work of prophets during the

               eighth century B.C. in order to promote religious

               reform which did not occur until after Josiah read

               the book (cf. 2 Ki. 22-23)

          3.   The problems of this classic approach are enormous

               for the conservative student of scripture

               including deception concerning Mosaic authority

               for Deuteronomy, and a rewriting of history for

               political purpose by the eighth century prophets

          4.   There are many levels upon which one can address

               the veracity of the classic Deuteronomistic

               approach (see Kitchen, Ancient Orient and Old

               Testament) including the fact that 2 Chronicles 34

               places the reforms of Josiah before the discovery

               of the book of the Law in the temple.  Therefore,

               it seems best to reject the historical

               reconstruction of a classic Deuteronomistic

               History

          5.   Nevertheless, the theological emphasis of a

               Deuteronomistic History is valuable for

               understanding the historical books because

               Israel's history is viewed in terms of her loyalty

               to the covenant--especially Deuteronomy 27--30:

               a.   Obedience to the Mosaic Law and faith in YHWH

                    will bring blessings and prosperity of the

                    Mosaic covenant

               b.   Disobedience to the Mosaic Law and a refusal

                    to trust in YHWH will bring cursing (cf.

                    Deut. 4; Josh. 23; Judges 2:11-23; 1 Sam. 12;

                    2 Sam. 7; 1 Ki. 8; 2 Ki. 17:7-23)

               c.   Nevertheless, Israel is continually

                    disobedient and deserving of judgment, but

                    God does not completely destroy the nation

                    because of his covenant with Abraham (Gen.

                    12)

     C.   The Design of the Historical Books:  To reveal God who

          works in accordance with his covenants

          1.   Western societies write history for information's

               sake, or to learn lessons from others, or to

               analyze elements of naturalistic cause and effect

          2.   Ancient Near Eastern societies often wrote history

               as a tool of propaganda in order to honor those in

               power with "historical" accounts which ignored the

               negative and embellished the positive

          3.   However, Israel's historical approach hardly could

               be considered to be with the design of propaganda

               (even for the Davidic dynasty) since it includes

               so much of the faults of its rulers (including

               David--2 Samuel)

          4.   The design of Israel's historical literature was

               to teach about the way in which YHWH, their

               covenant God, acted in history--especially in view

               of Israel's failures and unfaithfulness:

               a.   Legal literature declared God's will which

                    was designed to mold the moral, spiritual,

                    and ethical direction of the nation

               b.   Historical literature was a revelation

                    (record) of the sovereign work of God in

                    accordance with his covenants in history

               c.   Prophetic literature was a declaration of the

                    will of God in history in judgment of the

                    nation's historical dealings and in promise

                    of God's future blessing

               d.   Although Israel was unfaithful to their

                    Mosaic covenant with YHWH and often received

                    the judgment due them from their suzerain-

                    Lord, YHWH was also committed to his people

                    and delivered them in accordance with his

                    promises to Abraham with an eye to a New

                    Covenant which He would work in their hearts

II.  AUTHOR/EDITORS: Joshua, Eleazar the high priest and his son

     Phinehas, and/or other contemporaries of Joshua who outlived

     him

     A.   Hexateuch:  Some have identified this book with the

          Wellhausenian school which connected it with as part of

          a Hexateuch (Genesis-Joshua) with the same sources

          which made up the Pentateuch (JEDP) thus dating the

          book with eight and seventh century sources and a post-

          exilic author1

     B.   Deuteronomic History:  Some understand this book to

          have been the product of the editorial work of prophets

          during the eighth century B.C. in order to promote

          religious reform

     C.   A Fifteenth Century Author: There is much evidence to

          support that the book of Joshua was written by an

          author (authors) who lived during or near to the time

          when the events occurred:

          1.   External Evidence:

               a.   The Talmud affirms that "Joshua wrote his own

                    book" and that his death was recorded by

                    Eleazar son of Aaron and that Eleazar's death

                    was recorded by his son, Phinehas.2

               b.   Jewish medieval expositors3 affirmed that

                    most4 of the book came from Joshua's time5

          2.   Internal Evidence: Supports Joshua and those who

               may have been his contemporaries:

               a.   The book has an eyewitness quality:

                    1)   Especially in chapters 5--7

                    2)   Note the "we" and "us" references in

                         5:1, 6

                    3)   There are vivid descriptions of the

                         sending of the spies, the crossing of

                         the Jordan, the capture of Jericho, the

                         battle of Ai

               b.   The details in the latter chapters suggest

                    that those accounts were written by an author

                    who was a contemporary with Joshua if not

                    Joshua himself:6

                    1)   The chief Phoenician city was Sidon

                         (13:4ff; 19:28), but later, Tyre

                         conquered it

                    2)   Rahab was still alive (6:25)

                    3)   The sanctuary was not yet permanently

                         located (9:27)

                    4)   The Gibeonites were still menial

                         servants in the sanctuary (5:27; cf. 2

                         Sam. 21:1-6)

                    5)   The Jebusites still occupied Jerusalem

                         (15:8; cf. 2 Sam. 5:6ff)

                    6)   The Canaanites were still in Gezer

                         (16:10; cf. 1 Kgs. 9:16)

                    7)   Old place names (Canaanite cities) are

                         used and must be interpreted7

                    8)   The Philistines were not a national

                         menace to Israel as they became after

                         their invasion about 1200 B.C.

                    9)   Joshua is said to have written parts of

                         the book himself (8:32; 24:26)

               c.   Some parts of the book were written latter

                    than Joshua, but not much later:

                    1)   The phrase "to this day" suggests a time

                         later, but not much later, than the

                         event itself8

                    2)   Joshua's death (24:29-32)

                    3)   The relocation of Dan (19:40; cf. Judges

                         18:27ff)

                    4)   Reference to the "hill country of Judah"

                         and "of Israel" (11:21) may presuppose a

                         division of the country after Solomon's

                         death, but this could have been a later

                         editorial update

                    5)   Passages which summarize the life of

                         Joshua (4:14) or later Israelite history

                         (10:14)

                    6)   References to the book of Jashar (10:13;

                         cf. 2 Sam 1:18)

                    7)   References to Jair (13:30; see Judges

                         10:3-5)

                    8)   Expansion of the territory of Caleb

                         (15:13-19; see Judges 1:8-15)

               d.   Woudstra's comments are helpful: "The lack of

                    unanimity among those who argue for a late

                    date, though paralleled somewhat by a similar

                    deficiency among those favoring an early

                    date, is nevertheless a just reason to

                    examine the data afresh and to maintain a

                    healthy skepticism with respect to some of

                    the critics' claims. Is this not ample

                    justification for taking the presentation of

                    the book to be more true to fact than has

                    long been allowed? Would not that also have

                    some bearing on its date of composition?

                    Could not the view of history developed in

                    Joshua have been the product of the days in

                    which Israel, according to the book's own

                    testimony, 'served the Lord' (24:31), i.e.,

                    in the days of Joshua himself and of the

                    elders who outlived him? The spirit of Joyful

                    optimism which pervades the book by and large

                    could perhaps be accounted for best by that

                    assumption."9

III. CANONICAL PLACEMENT OF JOSHUA:

     A.   Hebrew Scriptures: One of the Prophets

          1.   Joshua is grouped with the "Writings"

          2.   The "Prophets" is grouped into "Former Prophets"

               (Joshua-2 Kings [not including Ruth]) and "Latter

               Prophets" (Isaiah-Malachi [without Lamentations

               and Daniel])

          3.   It was the first book of the Former Prophets

          4.   Perhaps this book was included with the prophets

               for the following reasons:

               a.   Joshua was himself a prophet

               b.   The book of Joshua proclaims truths taught by

                    the prophets

               c.   "Labeling them as prophetic rather than

                    historical suggests that these books are

                    primarily theological in nature rather than

                    annalistic."10

               d.   Classification of the Prophets11:  The

                    prophets may be identified within three basic

                    categories--(1) pre-monarchy12, (2) pre-

                    classical13, (3) classical14--as the

                    following chart unfolds:15

 

      PERIOD       FUNCTION   AUDIENCE    MESSAGE    EXAMPLES

 

  PRE-MONARCHY   Mouthpiece-  People    Nation      Moses

                 lead                   guidance,   Deborah

                                        Maintenance

                                        of justice,

                                        Spiritual

                                        overseer

  PRE-CLASSICAL  Mouthpiece-  King and  Military    Nathan

                 adviser      court     advice,     Elijah

                                        Pronounceme Elisha

                                        nt of       Micaiah

                                        rebuke or

                                        blessing

                                                    Transition:

                                                    North-Jonah1

                                                    South-

                                                    Isaiah

 

  CLASSICAL      Mouthpiece-  People    Rebuke      Writing

                 social/spiri           concerning  Prophets

                 tual                   current     Best

                 commentator            condition   example:

                                        of society; Jeremiah

                                        leads to

                                        warnings of

                                       

Visibility: Everyone
Posted: Monday July 8, 2013, 5:10 am
Tags: [add/edit tags]

Group Discussions
Comments
Or, log in with your
Facebook account:

Author

Hercolena Oliver
female, age 45, single, 3 children
Durban, NU, South Africa
HERCOLENA'S SHARES
Jul
28
(0 comments  |  discussions )
\nMatthew 26:52-53: “Put your sword back in its place,” Jesus said to him. “All who take the sword will die by the sword. Don’t you know that I could call on my Father for help and at once he would send me more than twelve legio...
Jul
8
(0 comments  |  discussions )
\nA Spiritual Community\r\n \r\nEs say Topics\r\n \r\nHow You Would Go About Forming a Local Believing\r\nCommunity\r\ nHow You Would Go About Forming A Local Church as a\r\nProclaiming Community\r\nHow You Would Mold a Local Group of Believers into a\r\nHoly Co...
(0 comments  |  discussions )
\nThe Bible in Western Culture\r\n \r\nEssa ys\r\n \r\nThe Bible in Western Culture\r\n \r\nBibl e is a primary document of Western culture, basic to  understanding of\r\nthe western philosophical, literary, cultural and scientific\r\ntradition. Focu...


SHARES FROM HERCOLENA'S NETWORK
Feb
17
(0 comments  |  discussions )
WELCOME WILDFLOWERS~
Feb
15
(0 comments  |  discussions )
SCRIPTURE~WILD CONE FLOWERS~A NEW THING~
(0 comments  |  discussions )
PRAYING HANDS~PRAYER WARRIORS~
(0 comments  |  discussions )
SCRIPTURE~DAFFODIL~PERFEC T IN WEAKNESS~
(0 comments  |  discussions )
SCRIPTURE~DAFFODIL~WALK BY FAITH~


MORE MEMBER BLOGS
Mar 31
Blog: How to Extend the Life of your TRIAD Boilers by Kayleigh L.
(0 comments  |  discussions ) — \\nHow to Extend the Life of your TRIAD Boilers \\r\\n \\r\\nCorlis Engine Review\\r\\nEvery user desires to prolong the life of a unit. TRIAD assists their clients in achieving this important objective by informing them of ways they can avoid problems... more
Feb 27
Blog: Dr Oz Weight Loss - The 100% Natural And Very Efficient Diet Pill by Debra S.
(0 comments  |  discussions ) — \\nYes, Dr. Oz called Garcinia Cambogia Extract (HCA) the Holy Grail of Weight Loss. He went on to say, “Anytime I see a scientist get this excited about something like Garcinia Cambogia Extract and when I looked through some of this research and... more
Blog: My Favorite Websites by krysta I.
(0 comments  |  discussions ) — \\nIFAW: www.ifaw.org\\r\\nOCEANA www.oceana.org\\r\\nPETA: www.peta.org\\r\\nEARTH 911: www.earth911.org\\r\\nANI MALs ASIA: www.animalsasia.org\\r\\n \\r\\n\\r\\n\\n more
Feb 21
Blog: testing one two three by Geoff M.
(0 comments  |  discussions ) — hello world more
Blog: Garcinia Cambogia Reviews From Actual People Garcinia Pure Extract Is A Huge Success February 20 by Dany M.
(0 comments  |  0 discussions ) — \\nGarcinia Cambogia Reviews From Actual People Garcinia Pure Extract Is A Huge Success February 20\\r\\nGarcinia Cambogia System The Dr. Oz Lose Weight Quick Process Without Having Side Effects\\r\\nHe went on to say, “At any time I see a researcher... more
 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.