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Aug 28, 2006
Lots and lots of rain in the Ozarks! The creeks are up!!!!!
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Posted: Aug 28, 2006 11:25am
Aug 26, 2006
You can also seethis orticle online at www.thetraveleronline.com under News then see article title:

Chicken feed: UA researcher seeks uses for biodiesel by-product

Nichelle Sullivan

Issue date: 8/25/06 Section: News
  • Page 1 of 1
A UA researcher is looking for funding to develop glycerin, a byproduct of biodiesel, for use in animal feed.

Park Waldroup, a UA poultry science professor, is working on research concerning the purification and development of glycerin for use in feed for poultry and swine.

However, funding is limited for research in this developing field, Waldroup said.

With the commercial development of biodiesel, a non-toxic and clean burning diesel fuel, a substantial amount - 10 to 12 percent - of the byproduct of the process is composed of glycerin, he said.

Waldroup is interested in putting that byproduct to use, he said.

Glycerin is commonly known as a slightly sweet- tasting carbohydrate that is often used in toothpaste, lotions and soaps because of its moisturizing capabilities, Waldroup said.

Glycerin is also a pure carbohydrate that could be potentially used as an energy source for chicken feed, Waldroup said.

Waldroup conducted a study to research the feasibility of using glycerin as an energy source for chickens, the results of which were published in the July 17 issue of "Feedstuffs," a weekly trade magazine for the feed industry,

The results of the study showed that while glycerin can be used as a source of energy for chicken diets, further studies are needed to determine the percentage and appropriate quality of glycerin that can be added to animal feed.

Waldroup wants to explore and research those questions in depth but research money in the biodiesel industry is hard to come by, he said.

"The biggest obstacle is funding," Waldroup said. "The biodiesel industry is small, segmented and does not have the same research resources that the petroleum industry possesses."

Many biodiesel companies are interested in the development of glycerin feed mixture because of the potential market it could open up as an economic alternative to using corn feed, he said.

However, many of these fledgling biodiesel companies are unable to put fund the necessary research, Waldroup said.

Biodiesel companies are willing to donate the excess glycerin for research, but Waldroup needs funding to pay for the feed, the chickens as well as pay graduate students helping with the research, he said.

Professor Waldroup's research interests are in alternative ingredients.
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Posted: Aug 26, 2006 8:39am
Aug 26, 2006
Here are some articles from my University paper (yesterday's edition). They are related to my recent blog.......it's in a lot of people's conciousness! This gives two sides and provokes questions for research..... Take it all in and enjoy the brainstorm!


you can go to this link if you don't want to read the article here... www.thetraveleronline.com got to opinion and Fueling the Future.

Fueling the future

Biofuel cost outweighs reward

Traveler Editorial Board

Issue date: 8/25/06 Section: Opinion
 Before we travel to the land of floating cars that run on banana peels, ending all our pocketbook woes and saving the environment from the depths of a global meltdown, we must choose.

We can take a turn and head to Gas-ville. Fuel-efficient technology can cut fuel demand to a relative rate like we had in the good old days, when gas was cheap and bottled water was a joke.

On another road, we fork into a network of paths: Bio-fuel Lane, Hydrogen Highway, Electric Avenue.

Questions about fuel alternatives, bio-fuel, hydrogen engines and fuel-efficient automobiles are constantly surfacing in reaction to increased gas prices.

In February, President Bush signed the Advanced Energy Initiative. His letter in support of last year's Energy Policy Act called for funding a 22 percent increase in clean-energy technology research at the Department of Energy.

He wrote, "to change how we power our automobiles, we will increase our research in better batteries for hybrid and electric cars and in pollution-free cars that run on hydrogen. We will also fund additional research in cutting-edge methods of producing ethanol, not just from corn, but from wood chips, stalks, or switch grass."

Thank you, Mr. President.

E-85, an 85-percent ethanol and 15-percent gasoline fuel mix, is available at 600 fuel stations across the country.

A buffet of alternative energies is available to reduce the heavy toll of gas prices on our economy. Maybe we can use biofuels to cutout the oil-man but biofuel is not a permanent solution. Its journey to the mainstream market is marred with criticism.

David Pimentel, professor of ecology and agriculture at Cornell, and Tad W. Patzek, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Berkeley, conducted a detailed analysis of the energy input-yield ratios of producing ethanol from corn, switch grass and wood biomass as well as for producing biodiesel from soybean and sunflower plants, published in "Natural Resources Research."

Energy input to produce these biofuels nullifies the positive. Corn requires 29 percent more fossil energy than it produces. Switch grass requires 45 percent more fossil energy than the fuel produced. Wood biomass requires 57 percent more fossil energy than the fuel produced. For biodiesel productions, soybean plants require 27 percent more fossil energy than the fuel produced. Sunflower plants require 118 percent more fossil energy than the fuel produced.

When selecting your alternative fuel of the future, don't forget about the environment.

Bill Chameides, chief scientist for Environmental Defense, a high profile non-profit organization based in Washington, hosted a seminar on global warming April 14 at the UA. His crew of scientists study ice core data, measuring carbon dioxide concentrations in polar glaciers.

Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere are currently riding at 380,000 parts per million. Throughout hundreds of thousands of years of ice core data, he determined that Earth had never topped out at more than 300,000 parts per million.

The Environmental Protection Agency Web site, www.epa.gov, attributes the increase in carbon dioxide to "the combustion of fossil fuels and other human activities."

In 1997, the United States contributed one-fifth of global emissions.

Last century, our forefathers selected petroleum fuels as their biomass (any living matter that can be converted into usable energy through biological or chemical processes) of choice. Internal combustion engines were efficient and fast. Depending on the selection of cylinders and horsepower, cars could be fast and powerful or hearty and efficient.

This century we stand at the brink of a decision that will shape not just prices at the pump but the very air we breathe and the quality of the food we eat.

The year 2006 is filled with electronic options that our parents could only begin to fathom after seeing "2001: A Space Odyssey."

Internet connections flow through the air. You can have a conversation with a virtual loved one on the other side of the world that can be viewed on a flat panel television screen hanging on a wall.

Five years after the film's illustrious predictions for the 21st century, we find ourselves in a not too foreign world with a few more problems than the film had let on. "2001: A Space Odyssey" did not tell us how to power all our high-tech gadgets.

The sun, Earth's ultimate energy source, sends heat energy through the atmosphere and into plants, water, animals and people, heating it all up. That's good, until human energy needs burn enough biomass - coal and gasoline in this case - into the atmosphere to offset Earth's natural balance of atmospheric gases.

We want a fuel that will take us to the mall/grocery store/dog park without burning carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. We want it clean, green and we want it cheap.

Come on hydrogen and solar power.

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Posted: Aug 26, 2006 8:22am
Aug 24, 2006
You must check out this article! Go BioWillie!!!!! It's happening and I am so excited!

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5698538

cheers!
ash



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Posted: Aug 24, 2006 10:39am
Aug 9, 2006
DAILY OM

(I love this one!)

 August 8, 2006

Tedious Pursuits

Boredom
The human mind thrives on novelty. What was once a source of pleasure can become tedious after a time. Though our lives are full, boredom lurks around every corner because we innately long for new experiences. Yet boredom by its very nature is passive. In this idle state of mind, we may feel frustrated at our inability to channel our mental energy into productive or engaging tasks. We may even attempt to lose ourselves in purposeless or self-destructive pursuits. While this can be a sign of depression, it can also be an invitation issued from your mind, asking you to challenge yourself. Boredom can become the motivation that drives you to learn, explore the exotic, experiment, and harness the boundless creative energy within.

In Hindu and Buddhist traditions, boredom is perceived as a pathway to self-awareness. Boredom itself is not detrimental to the soul-it is the manner in which we respond to it that determines whether it becomes a positive or a negative influence in our lives. When you respond by actively filling the emptiness you feel lurking in yourself, you cultivate creativity and innovation. If, when in the grip of boredom, you have difficulty acknowledging the merits of any activities you might otherwise enjoy, generate your own inspiration. Before you find yourself beset by boredom, create a list of tasks you can consult when it feels like there is simply nothing to do. Referring to a list of topics you want to learn more about, projects you've yet to begin, or even pending chores can spark your creative energy and reawaken your zest for life.

When we are troubled by boredom, it is not that there is nothing to do but rather that we are not stimulated by the options before us. A bored mind can be the canvas upon which innovation is painted and the womb in which novelty is nourished. When you identify boredom as a signal that you need to test your boundaries, it can be the force that presses you to strive for opportunities you thought were beyond your reach and to indulge your desire for adventure.
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Posted: Aug 9, 2006 5:22am
Aug 4, 2006
http://www.geocities.com/eponasdreams/lughnasadh.html

Tis the harvest season!

A time to honor reflection and past action.

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Posted: Aug 4, 2006 5:32am
Aug 3, 2006
www.thebreastcancersite.org      CLick to donate and it is linked to about 5 other site.
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Posted: Aug 3, 2006 10:45am
Aug 3, 2006
In case you've overlooked today's Daily Action:

http://www.care2.com/dailyaction/primary.html?da%5Btoday%5D=2006-08-03

Go to Learn more: What's in your product, then to Skin Deep and this page will allow you to type in a product you use and find out what is in it.

Support companies who care.......
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Posted: Aug 3, 2006 10:40am
Aug 2, 2006
www.Salon.com  one of the featured articles today 8/2/06 "Jicama in the Hood" talks about expanding whole and organic foods to lower income areas and the choices (lack there of) that they have. Most interesting is how their life has been fed by conventionally raised and degraded food which initially gives a preference away from a more flavorful, nutritious whole food. We are shaped. But I believe over time and influence we are shaped again. Actually, it's continual shaping.
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Posted: Aug 2, 2006 5:31am
Aug 2, 2006
http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2006/08/02/cronin/index.html
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Posted: Aug 2, 2006 5:17am

 

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Sonnenshine m.
, 3, 1 child
Fayetteville, AR, USA
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