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Nov 6, 2008

Good emergency medical skills can literally mean the difference between life and death. That’s why it’s so important that health care professionals who use these skills receive the best training available. Many physicians, medical students, and emergency responders go through a crucial training program called Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATL. Most ATLS courses across the country use sophisticated manikins based on human anatomy. However, a handful of these programs continue to use live animals, all of whom are killed in the process.

Regulated by the American College of Surgeons, ATLS courses teach lifesaving procedures used for acute trauma injuries. These include procedures to relieve an obstructed airway, remove fluid from the sac surrounding the heart, and so forth.

A PCRM survey shows that out of 166 responding U.S. facilities offering ATLS courses, more than 90 percent exclusively use nonanimal models for instruction. Unfortunately, 12 of the responding programs continue to use live animals.

PCRM is working to reform the ATLS programs at these 12 institutions, including the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s (UMDNJ) University Hospital in Newark. PCRM’s Research Advocacy Department filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Agriculture requesting that its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHI inspect the unlawful use of live pigs at University Hospital in July. The complaint charges that the hospital is violating the Animal Welfare Act, because nonanimal alternatives are available and in widespread use. These alternatives are endorsed by the American College of Surgeons.

UMDNJ’s University Hospital is the only New Jersey institution that still uses animals to teach ATLS. Four other ATLS programs, including two within the UMDNJ system—Cooper University Hospital in Camden and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick—all use nonanimal teaching tools, such as the TraumaMan System.

TraumaMan from SimulabTraumaMan is an anatomical human body form that is widely used in military courses, EMS training, and other trauma surgery simulations. It is now the dominant method for teaching ATLS procedures. These realistic simulators come with lifelike human skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle. They can even bleed. Unlike animals, the manikins duplicate human anatomy and allow students to repeatedly practice all the necessary procedures.
Prior to 2001, human cadavers were the only approved alternative to animals in ATLS courses, but that year the American College of Surgeons approved TraumaMan for this purpose.

PCRM’s efforts to reform University Hospital’s ATLS program received major media coverage, including a news article and opinion piece in the Newark Star-Ledger. New Jersey native and actor Lisa Edelstein, who plays Dr. Cuddy on FOX’s acclaimed medical drama House, wrote Dr. William F. Owen Jr., the president of UMDNJ, and asked him to replace the pigs with more humane teaching methods.

PCRM has filed nine other APHIS complaints about ATLS courses and is awaiting the government’s response. To keep up with the latest on PCRM’s ATLS campaign, please visit PCRM.org.

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Posted: Nov 6, 2008 3:47pm
Nov 6, 2008

Please take a look and then take action on our petition site for stopping the use of live animals in training medical students at various military bases.  Thanks!

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Posted: Nov 6, 2008 3:10pm
Oct 3, 2008

Just the idea of breast cancer sends fear shooting through every woman.  We have all heard story after story of suffering that women who are diagnosed with breast cancer go through.  Well...here is mine.

After changing physicians, for some reason I actually listened to my new doctor and went for a mammogram, a test I had neglected for some 6-7 years.  I wasn't worried as I had felt no lumps nor noticed anything at all unusual.  I was then informed that the radiologist saw something "suspicious" on my films and I went for a breast biopsy, a procedure I was ill-prepared for.  As I lay on the table completely immobile, I couldn't stop myself from quietly sobbing with dread.  I went for 2 more biopsies and on March 5th of this year I was diagnosed with stage I DCIS breast cancer.  During the course of my conversation with my physician I mechanically and dutifully wrote down everything my he told me as he was well aware that after I heard those fearful words "breast cancer," I would hear nothing else.  And I didn't.  I was dumb with shock while being terrifyingly aware that breast cancer killed both my mom and my grandmother.  I remembered my mom's fear, her utter panic, her chemo and radiation treatments.  After a few days I also remembered she survived for 20 years more.

DCIS means ductal carcinoma in situ.  It is restricted to the milk ducts and was not an "invasive" form of cancer in my case.  I don't know if that is it's nature, ie, non-invasive, or not.  Anyone reading this needs to check with their own doctor to be sure.  Non-invasive or not, cancer needs to be treated and treated I was. 

To make a fairly long story shorter on May 30 I endured 19 hours of grueling surgery for a double mastectomy with immediate trans-flap reconstruction.  I was in intensive care for 3 days and was then judged to be well enough to be moved to a regular room where I stayed an additional 2 days.  I was off work for 2 1/2 months often in a great deal of pain.  My mid-section is still numb.  So is part of my back and my breasts will never have feeling in them again.  But I'm alive.  I did not have to endure the horrors of chemotherapy nor radiation.  All traces of my breast cancer were removed with the mastectomies.  My surgeon did find some invasive cells and removed all of it.  I do have an oncologist who takes care of my medication that I will need to take for the next 5 years.  I will have the last of my reconstruction done sometime this month. 

I remember the night before my surgery as I sat in the bathtub I sobbed my heart out like I had never done before.  All I could think of was, Well, this is the last night I'll be a "real" woman, no man will ever desire me or love me again.  I won't be worth anything anymore.  Ever.  Since that time I have come to realize the shallowness of that thought process.  Having "breasts" large or small, real, fake or reconstructed does not make me or anyone else a "real" woman.  What makes me a "real" woman is what is inside my heart.  It's a question of perception in it's finest form.  What is important in life and what is not.  How I live my life, do I make positive contributions to my God, my family and my community?  Do I consider and have compassion not only and just for my wolves but for people?  Can I somehow make a positive difference in people's lives?  I believe I can answer those questions honestly by saying yes.  If I can help convince even one woman to get her mammogram, the fear, pain and suffering I've gone through will be well worth it.

Remember, I had absolutely NO symptoms of illness.  No lumps, no unusual changes, nothing whatsoever.  I had breast cancer and never even knew it.

Do not procrastinate, do not rationalize.  Medical advancements are tremendous.  Breast cancer is NOT a death sentence!  One of my favorite phrases now is:  Cancer a word, not a sentence. 

Please ladies get your mammograms! It can save your life...it saved mine!


 

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Posted: Oct 3, 2008 10:38pm
Jan 11, 2007

 

 

JACKSON -- Wyoming officials are seeking assurances from the federal government that delisting of wolves will be prompt, and that the state will be able to limit damage to livestock and wildlife before then, as they eye a possible compromise on wolf management.

The state sent a letter Monday outlining more than 43 questions to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Director Mitch King. They ask if the government will reduce wolf packs to about 15 packs required after delisting, if the government will fund the state's wolf management, and if the government will compensate for livestock losses.

All this comes after King met with state officials in mid-December to discuss a possible compromise that would allow Wyoming to move toward removing the gray wolf from federal protection. The state is rushing to get answers in order to draft bills reflecting the proposed compromise in the current legislative session.

King said Wednesday the federal government will likely not compensate for livestock losses, and will likely not reduce wolf packs. He said his agency has crafted a formal response to Wyoming's letter, and it is in the nation's capital for final approval.

He said federal funding is "one of the real tough nuts to crack," as dollars for protected species come from a recovery account.

"Once we delist, then it's not necessarily appropriate for us to spend recovery dollars except for monitoring monies," he said. Funding may come through work with the congressional delegation, he said.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department has estimated it will cost a total of $2.4 million per year to manage wolves and grizzly bears after they're delisted.

Wyoming's questions also address legal ramifications of the state's plan to classify wolves as predators in most of the state outside northwest Wyoming, allowing them killed any time, by any means and for any reason, and whether that classification would hold up in court. Federal officials had called that approach unacceptable until recently, offering to allow predator status for wolves outside an expanded "trophy game" area.

"What effect will (Fish and Wildlife's) reversal on the issue of dual classification have on the sustainability of the delisting rule?" the letter asks. "What efforts will (Fish and Wildlife) undertake to insure that their reversal of position on the predator issue will be adequately explained in the administrative record?"

Ryan Lance, deputy chief of staff for Gov. Dave Freudenthal, drafted the letter with help of Rep. Pat Childers, R-Cody, Sen. Bruce Burns, R-Sheridan, and Game and Fish Department Director Terry Cleveland.

Lance said the key question is who is authorized to negotiate with Wyoming on behalf of the federal government.

"From a practical standpoint, we want to know who is authorized to negotiate on their behalf, and bind the Fish and Wildlife Service and Department of Interior to a particular course," Lance said.

King said he will be the person to negotiate, and the decision maker will be Dale Hall, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Some questions posed in the letter have already been answered. For example, the letter asks, "What management authority will Wyoming Game and Fish have within the trophy game area?"

Game and Fish Director Cleveland has said the agency will issue licenses to kill wolves in trophy game areas and will regulate killing there. Lance said there are "nuances" in that management the state wants to clarify.

The state also asked how it will be able to manage wolves in the period between proposed delisting and a final court decision upholding delisting. All parties expect wolf delisting to be challenged in court.

"During this period, what efforts (is Fish and Wildlife) willing to undertake to limit damage to livestock or wildlife herds?" the letter asks.

King said during that period, Wyoming would be governed by the rule that governs Idaho and Montana now. That rule allows for more liberal killing of wolves that prey on livestock, but does not generally allow for the killing of wolves suspected of harming big game herds, he said.

King was traveling to Cheyenne Wednesday to meet with lawmakers and representatives of agriculture organizations. Asked if he had met with environmental groups, King said he has met with Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife. That group tends to be against high wolf numbers, saying the animals harm big game hunting opportunities.

King said there are other meetings planned to try to "cover all the bases we can."

Childers said the state is looking for more answers.

"The state of Wyoming needs a more clear offer from (Fish and Wildlife) as a proposed settlement on wolf management, and we do not have that now," he said in an e-mail. "The questions ... were sent to clarify the basis that we need to negotiate. Before we can even talk about a bill, we need that information."

Environmental reporter Whitney Royster can be reached at (307) 734-0260 or at
royster@tribcsp.com.

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Posted: Jan 11, 2007 8:54am
Jan 1, 2007
Once again Wyoming is attempting the wholesale slaughter of as many as 16 successful breeding packs.  Please note especially the ridiculous comment made by Mitch King in this article referring to the preservation of these packs as  an "emotional argument".  Well,  Mr. King, excuse those of us who care passionately about the lives of these magnificent and noble animals who have as much right to life and freedom as we do.
I love what Meredith Taylor, of the Wyoming Outdoor council, says, "Why would we waste all the wildlife conservation success that we've invested by killing up to 16 wolf packs now?" she asked. "Wyoming took a big step forward with wolf recovery 10 years ago, but this shift in management by the (Fish and Wildlife Service) is a giant step back into the dark ages of wolf slaughter that got the wolves listed in the first place."
Click on the link to read the full story
http://www.wolf.org/wolves/news/live_news_detail.asp?id=1791
As always, our battles continue...
Peace and Blessings to all in the New Year!

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Posted: Jan 1, 2007 9:47pm
Dec 22, 2006
Please note this article courtesy of Defenders of Wildlife

Conservation groups increase reward for information on wolf killings

Madison, WI -- A record nine wolves, including four that were wearing radio collars, were killed during this year’s gun deer hunting season, prompting conservation groups to contribute to the reward fund for information leading to the arrest of the persons responsible for these illegal killings. The Timber Wolf Alliance is contributing $1,000, and Defenders of Wildlife is offering an additional $1,000 per incident, on top of the $2,000 reward from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Wolves are protected under the Endangered Species Act, and federal law prohibits killing wolves in Wisconsin.

"These killings mar an otherwise positive conservation story in a state that is proud of its natural heritage," said Adrian Wydeven, conservation biologist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). "The wolf's recovery here in Wisconsin is truly a success story, and now it seems we’re taking a step backwards with these killings."

According to state and federal wildlife officials, this year's gun deer hunting season has brought a dramatic increase in the number of wolf shootings. Before this year, the record number of wolves killed in a single hunting season was five, in 2002. Last year, two wolves were reported killed, and in 2004 just one was shot.

"We've seen almost twice as many wolves killed this year, compared to 2002," said Gina Schrader, conservation associate with Defenders of Wildlife. "Our children deserve to inherit a world where wolves roam the wild, places where wildlife persists without persecution."

Wolves were nearly eliminated from Wisconsin after years of predator control bounties and habitat loss. With the help of federal protections, wolf populations have rebounded. Today, wildlife officials estimate that there are 465 wolves in 115 packs across the state; however, it is still against the law to take a Wisconsin wolf.

"By posting rewards, we are telling the citizens of Wisconsin that we take illegal wolf killings very seriously," said Pam Troxell, coordinator of the Timber Wolf Alliance.

Defenders of Wildlife's contribution comes from its Endangered Species Reward Fund, established in 1997 to bring illegal predator-killers to justice. The Timber Wolf Alliance's contribution comes from private donations.

Tips on the wolf killings can be made anonymously through the Wisconsin DNR by calling 1-800-847-9367. For more information, please visit the Wisconsin DNR website.

###

Defenders of Wildlife is recognized as one of the nation's most progressive advocates for wildlife and its habitat. With more than 500,000 members and supporters, Defenders of Wildlife works with federal, tribal, state, and local agencies, private organizations, and landowners to protect America's national wildlife refuges. For more information, visit www.defenders.org.

The Timber Wolf Alliance is a program of the Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute of Northland College, based in Ashland, Wisconsin. The Timber Wolf Alliance promotes strategies that enhance wolf populations and teach people about the wolf's role as an integral part of a healthy woodland ecosystem. For more information, visit the Timber Wolf Alliance website.

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Posted: Dec 22, 2006 9:45pm
Dec 22, 2006

Please note: this article courtesy of Defenders of Wildlife

Madison, WI -- A record nine wolves, including four that were wearing radio collars, were killed during this year’s gun deer hunting season, prompting conservation groups to contribute to the reward fund for information leading to the arrest of the persons responsible for these illegal killings. The Timber Wolf Alliance is contributing $1,000, and Defenders of Wildlife is offering an additional $1,000 per incident, on top of the $2,000 reward from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Wolves are protected under the Endangered Species Act, and federal law prohibits killing wolves in Wisconsin.

"These killings mar an otherwise positive conservation story in a state that is proud of its natural heritage," said Adrian Wydeven, conservation biologist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). "The wolf's recovery here in Wisconsin is truly a success story, and now it seems we’re taking a step backwards with these killings."

According to state and federal wildlife officials, this year's gun deer hunting season has brought a dramatic increase in the number of wolf shootings. Before this year, the record number of wolves killed in a single hunting season was five, in 2002. Last year, two wolves were reported killed, and in 2004 just one was shot.

"We've seen almost twice as many wolves killed this year, compared to 2002," said Gina Schrader, conservation associate with Defenders of Wildlife. "Our children deserve to inherit a world where wolves roam the wild, places where wildlife persists without persecution."

Wolves were nearly eliminated from Wisconsin after years of predator control bounties and habitat loss. With the help of federal protections, wolf populations have rebounded. Today, wildlife officials estimate that there are 465 wolves in 115 packs across the state; however, it is still against the law to take a Wisconsin wolf.

"By posting rewards, we are telling the citizens of Wisconsin that we take illegal wolf killings very seriously," said Pam Troxell, coordinator of the Timber Wolf Alliance.

Defenders of Wildlife's contribution comes from its Endangered Species Reward Fund, established in 1997 to bring illegal predator-killers to justice. The Timber Wolf Alliance's contribution comes from private donations.

Tips on the wolf killings can be made anonymously through the Wisconsin DNR by calling 1-800-847-9367. For more information, please visit the Wisconsin DNR website.

###

Defenders of Wildlife is recognized as one of the nation's most progressive advocates for wildlife and its habitat. With more than 500,000 members and supporters, Defenders of Wildlife works with federal, tribal, state, and local agencies, private organizations, and landowners to protect America's national wildlife refuges. For more information, visit www.defenders.org.

The Timber Wolf Alliance is a program of the Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute of Northland College, based in Ashland, Wisconsin. The Timber Wolf Alliance promotes strategies that enhance wolf populations and teach people about the wolf's role as an integral part of a healthy woodland ecosystem. For more information, visit the Timber Wolf Alliance website.

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Posted: Dec 22, 2006 9:30pm
Nov 22, 2006
This is an email I received from Defenders of Wildlife

Help Save
Wyoming Wolves

Wolf in the Winter (Photo: Corel)

Wyoming officials are suing the federal government, so they can remove as many as two-thirds of the wolves in the state. If they win, wolves lose: As many as 200 wolves, including mothers and pups could die.

Take Action red

Help us save wolves and send 30,000 messages urging Wyoming officials to drop their lawsuit by Monday November 27th.

Help spread the word. Forward this message to a friend.



Dear greywolf,

Wyoming has declared war on wolves. State officials have filed a lawsuit to compel the federal government to remove as many as two-thirds of the wolves in Wyoming. And, unless we stop them, as many as 200 wolves and their pups could die.

Last week, Defenders of Wildlife and allied conservation groups launched emergency legal action to stop Wyoming’s plan, but we need your help.

Take action now! Urge Wyoming Governor Dave Freudenthal and the state Attorney General to withdraw their lawsuit and get serious about promoting sustainable wolf management in the Northern Rockies.

Wyoming’s lawsuit challenges the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s refusal to approve the state’s wolf management plan and eliminate Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in their state.

The federal government had good cause to reject Wyoming’s plan. If approved, the state’s wolf “management” plan would legalize indiscriminate killing throughout 90% of the wolf’s Wyoming range outside of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.

Killing of wolves in areas near these parks would be regulated, but wolves elsewhere in Wyoming could be shot on sight.

Help save Wyoming wolves. Send your message to state officials now.

Wolves play a crucial role in maintaining balanced ecosystems, helping to ensure that increasing elk and other game populations do not overwhelm available habitat. But wolves also play an increasingly important role in the region’s economy.

According to a recent study, the roughly 151,000 people who visit Yellowstone National Park each year to see wolves bring in $35 million to Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. And nearly four percent of Yellowstone National Park’s 2.8 million annual visitors say they would not have visited the nation’s oldest national park if wolves weren’t there. [1]

Urge Wyoming to drop its frivolous lawsuit and adopt a sensible wolf management plan that federal officials can approve. 

Wolf recovery in the Northern Rockies is one of the great conservation victories of the last century. It’s up to us to ensure that it lasts.

Sincerely,

Rodger Schlickeisen, President Signature
Rodger Schlickeisen
President
Defenders of Wildlife
Rodger Schlickeisen, President (c)Daniel J. Cox/www.naturalexpos

Notes

[1] http://www.billingsgazette.net/articles/2006/04/07/news/state/25-wolves.prt

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Posted: Nov 22, 2006 10:43pm
Nov 15, 2006
Dear Friend,

Do you believe that dogfighting and cockfighting are illegal in
most states, but these activities are surprisingly widespread
across the country? This is partly because of weak penalties in
the federal law.

Currently, the House of Representatives is considering a federal
bill called the Animal Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act to
increase the penalties for this barbaric practice from a
misdemeanor to a felony.

If you go to the website below you can watch a special video
message from wrestling champ Hulk Hogan and send your message
directly to House Majority Leader John Boehner about the Animal
Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act (H.R. 817).

Please take action today because time is running out for
Congress to pass this important bill.
https://community.hsus.org/campaign/endanimalfighting_hulk_2?rk=GdS3MOn15mEFW

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Posted: Nov 15, 2006 11:40pm
Nov 8, 2006
                                       

This is an email I received from Defenders of Wildlife...time to celebrate!!!!  Our voices are heard!!!!

There were plenty of talking heads in Washington, DC, who said it couldn’t be done. But together we did it:

We beat America’s #1 Wildlife Villain and made history!

Early this morning, CNN projected a decisive victory for Jerry McNerney -- an independent businessman and avowed conservationist -- over Representative Richard Pombo, Chairman of the powerful House Resources Committee.

This is the most important political victory for conservationists in memory… and it wouldn’t have happened without the support of dedicated people like you.

Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund targeted Pombo in the fall of 2005, when every pundit and political party thought he was unbeatable. We were the first to place staff on the ground and worked with other groups over the last year to keep Pombo on the ropes.

Together, we’ve fought Pombo’s dangerous, self-serving agenda in Congress. We’ve run television and radio ads that turned the national spotlight on his corruption, his ties to special interests and his absolute disregard for our imperiled wildlife and great wild places.

And now we’ve sent Pombo packing, back home where he won’t be able to push legislation to gut the Endangered Species Act, sacrifice crucial polar bear habitat to Big Oil or sell off our National Parks to the highest bidder.

There were many victories for wildlife champions last night, but Pombo’s defeat is especially important to our imperiled animals and the wild places they need to survive.

This victory demonstrates that environmentalists have the political strength to take on and defeat the most extreme anti-environmental politicians, even the heads of powerful Congressional committees. (In fact, Pombo is the first committee chairman in at least the last five election cycles to lose a re-election bid.)

Thanks to your support, Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund was able to deploy an ambitious and effective field operation -- by far the largest on-the-ground mobilization of conservationists in Pombo’s Congressional District and one of the most significant efforts on behalf of wildlife protection anywhere this election year.

With your help, our dedicated staff and volunteers spoke with more than 75,000 households in Pombo’s district about his awful record. We sent tens of thousands of messages urging Pombo to clean up his act. And we mobilized thousands of volunteers to speak out for our wildlife and to get out the conservation vote.

This victory puts politicians across the country on notice: America’s wildlife supporters can and will hold them accountable when their votes threaten our natural heritage. 

Our fight to save America’s wildlife continues, and there will be plenty to do in the days and weeks ahead. But for now, please accept my sincere gratitude for everything you’ve done to help us fight for conservation, accountability and integrity.

Sincerely,

Rodger Schlickeisen, PresidentRodger Schlickeisen, President Signature
Rodger Schlickeisen
President
Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund



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Posted: Nov 8, 2006 10:44pm

 

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Greywolf Howl
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