START A PETITION 27,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
Aug 17, 2010

Naturally Protect Your Skin From Mosquito Bites


Taken from Care2's 'Daily Action':
Before you head for the hills or enjoy an outdoor evening BBQ, think twice about using DEET-based mosquito repellents.
Research shows that regular use of chemical repellents like DEET can:

  • Damage brain cells and Interact with medications.
  • Cause brain cell death and behavioural changes- as observed in animals exposed to DEET after frequent and prolonged use. *
  • Result in up to 15% of DEET being absorbed by the skin into the bloodstream.

Learn from Michelle Schoffro Cook how you can protect yourself and your loved ones from mosquitoes without covering your skin in dangerous chemicals.
Mosquito-Free Naturally
Here are some of Michelle's recommendations for natural mosquito repellents: (N.B. see details on each via the link supplied)
- Citronella
- Soy oil
- Catnip
- NEEM seed oil
- Lavender essential oil
- Garlic
Michelle Schoffro Cook, BSc, RNCP, ROHP, DNM
.
*This of course means that animals in laboratories suffered 'frequent and prolonged' cruel experiments.
I implore you not to reward the people making money from DEET products with your custom. 
It is your choice... you can:

  • STOP MAKING SUCH PEOPLE RICH;
  • STOP DECREASING YOUR OWN QUALITY OF LIFE.
Apr 30, 2010


Vitamin D Linked to Diabetes, Cancer, Depression, and More

Care2 article, posted by Michelle Schoffro Cook Apr 29, 2010
.
New evidence shows that people with higher levels of vitamin D experienced a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.
.
Researchers at the US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University just released its study linking low levels of vitamin D to diabetes in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The authors of the study concluded that maintaining optimal vitamin D levels in the blood may be a type 2 diabetes prevention strategy.
.
Other recent research found that vitamin D plays a critical role in activating the body’s immune system against infectious diseases like the flu. Researchers noted that a deficiency in this important vitamin, which actually acts more like a hormone in your body, may result in a greater risk of contracting flu viruses. Additional research has linked low amounts of vitamin D to autoimmune disorders, cancer, depression, diabetes, and heart disease.
.
Vitamin D also plays essential roles in supporting our energy and balancing our moods. It also helps to build healthy bones, heart, nerves, skin, and teeth, and it supports the health of the thyroid gland-a butterfly gland in the throat that helps maintain a healthy weight, balanced metabolism, and energy levels.
.
While moderate sunlight exposure is the best source of vitamin D, many people incorrectly think that a small amount of sunshine exposure daily is sufficient to meet their vitamin D requirements.
.
However, after your skin is exposed to sunlight, it takes about 48 hours to convert it into vitamin D. During that time, the sunlight-initiated precursors to vitamin D can be washed off with soap and water. So, if you scrub your skin with soap in the shower, your body will not convert most of your skin’s sun exposure to vitamin D. I’m not suggesting that you avoid showering after sun exposure rather that you primarily soap the areas that don’t usually see the light of day and wash the newly tanned ones exclusively with water. Avoid excessive sun exposure since there are no health benefits of sunburn.
.
Some vitamin D deficiency symptoms include: bow legs or “knock knees,” burning in mouth or throat, constipation, dental cavities or cracked teeth, insomnia, joint pains or bone pains, muscle cramps, nearsightedness (myopia-can’t see distances), nervousness, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, frequent colds or flu, and poor bone development.
.
Vitamin D is also found in fish and fish oils, sweet potatoes, sunflower seeds, mushrooms, and many types of sprouts. People with low thyroid function (hypothyroidism) tend to have difficulty with vitamin D absorption and as a result, may have higher needs for this nutrient.
.
Many health experts recommend supplementation of 2000 to 4000 IU daily. However, you should always consult a qualified health professional before supplementing with vitamin D since excessive amounts can build up in the body creating a potential risk for toxicity and is contraindicated for some health conditions.
.
A complete list of references is published in The Phytozyme Cure.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Michelle Schoffro Cook, RNCP, ROHP, DAc, DNM, is a best-selling and six-time book author and doctor of natural medicine, whose works include: The Life Force Diet, The Ultimate pH Solution, and The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan. Learn more at: www.TheLifeForceDiet.com. 

Apr 19, 2010

  "I don’t know if laughter is the best medicine, but it is certainly good medicine.
  "There is a lot of talk these days about positive attitude and how essential it is to coping with chronic illness. That is true, but I would add that a sense of humor may be just as important. The ability to laugh at our own foibles and missteps is sometimes just the tonic we need.
  "I can come up with dozens of examples of multiple sclerosis imposing on my life in a frustrating way, and quite a few instances where strangers have had a laugh at my expense. That’s no fun but, hey, that’s life."

From If Laughter is the Best Medicine, I'll Be Fine | Care2 Healthy & Green Living posted by Ann Pietrangelo
(Photos added from my
Album: LAUGHTER)
The article continues:
...Then there’s the time when having MS became the excuse that got me out of an absurdly awkward situation worthy of a sitcom.
  My husband and I were visiting London on business, but we had several lovely social functions on our agenda. This particular evening, we were scheduled to attend a cocktail party at a small art museum. I was beside myself with excitement as I slipped my little black dress over my head and shoulders. It felt a little tight as called out for my husband to zip me up. That excitement quickly turned to panic as he let loose with a soft whistle and I realized that the dress, when zipped, barely made it over my backside! Oh, why hadn’t I tried it on before packing? Just a few months ago it looked so darling on me. Amazing what two or three few pounds can do. All right, maybe five.
 So there I stood in my awkwardly high heels (another foolish error on my part), leaning on my cane, and wearing a dress that was straining at the seams. We weren't about to let that stop us, so we optimistically headed out into the winter chill to hail a cab. As if having MS and walking with a cane and high heels weren't challenging enough, the tight dress exaggerated my odd gait to the point of ridiculousness.
 Arriving at the museum, I carefully situated myself with my back to the wall, doing everything in my power to avoid mingling. There were very few seats around, so when a chair became available, I sat down- warily- hoping I wouldn't split my dress open and expose my backside in the process. I could almost feel the groaning of the tiny threads holding it all together. While hubby mingled, I sat. 
 Eventually it was announced that the unveiling of a particular piece of art — the reason for the whole affair — would take place on the second floor, and would all attendees please follow the guide upstairs. Stairs? We inquire as to the location of an elevator. No elevator? This is a definite turn for the worse.
 With my MS acting up, there was no way I could possibly make it up that long, wooden staircase in this ill-fitting dress and high heels without attracting curious eyes straight to my behind. I could almost hear the sound of fabric tearing and everybody turning to laugh and stare. As it was, I was beginning to giggle at my own situation. And when I laugh, I tend to also shed tears. I was beginning to feel quite conspicuous.
 I informed my hubby in no uncertain terms that I would remain glued to the chair regardless of what he or anybody else does or says. Up to this point he had been good-naturedly playing along with me, and now was barely containing his own laughter.
 The moment the last of the party-goers made it to the top of the stairs, we both burst into laughter at my predicament. Courteous museum staff, spotting the cane, inquire about my difficulty with the stairs. "Multiple sclerosis" we tell them in serious voices. Tears are falling from my eyes now, due to suppressed laughter, but no doubt mistaken for despair. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres were delivered with sympathetic smiles directly to our lonely corner. Now I really felt bad… and guilty… and silly. Embarrassed and unable to control my laughing/crying, we took advantage of a moment alone and skulked out the door first chance we got.
 It was a fabulous week in London, but that misadventure remains one of my fondest memories. If laughter truly is the best medicine, I'm going to be just fine.
--------------------------------
Writer Ann Pietrangelo embraces the
concept of personal responsibility for
health and wellness. As a person living
with multiple sclerosis, she combines
a healthy lifestyle and education
with modern medicine, and seeks
to provide information and support
to others. A regular contributor to
Care2 Causes.
Follow on Twitter
@AnnPietrangelo

Jul 19, 2009

Adapted from original article by Mel, selected from Natural Solutions magazine Jul 15, 2009
.
It’s common knowledge that smell effects how we feel. What we consider as “good” smells can lift our spirits while “bad” smells can drag us down or even agitate us. In fact, the French word sentir means both “to smell” and “to feel.”
.
We tend to “feel” scents rather than logically process them—understanding them more through associations and images than by analytical methods. This is because the human brain processes smells in its limbic region, which appears to be primarily responsible for our emotions. Interestingly, the limbic system is often called the rhinencephalon or “smell part” of the brain.

Several studies show that emotion and odours are directly linked and have been found to produce some of the same electrical impulses.
.
Essential oils contain natural phytochemicals that impact the limbic system.
.
When you inhale the scent of an oil, the brain releases various neurochemicals to create physiological changes in body, mind and spirit. When you smell lavender, for example, serotonin gets released, producing a calming influence in the body.
.
Pure essential oils are extracted directly from plant parts, including flowers, leaves, stems and roots, as well as the rind of their fruits. Outside of their direct healing properties these oils simply smell good, make us feel happier and serve as great stress and pain relievers.
.
The easiest and most common way to benefit from their essence is through aromatherapy:
— place a few drops of diluted oil directly on your skin and inhale the aroma. Note: always cut the essential oil with a base oilsee suggestions below and in original article.
— add drops to your bath or add drops to an aromatherapy diffuser which heats the oil and allows the smell to permeate the room.
—choose from a multitude of oils, ranging from bergamot (Citrus bergamia), which has a balancing effect, to sandalwood (Santalum album), which is known for its sensuous properties.
.
Base oils, also called carrier oils, make essential oils more versatile by cutting their strength without greatly reducing their effectiveness or aroma.
.
Some recommended base oils:
.
SWEET ALMOND OIL (Prunus dulcis, P. amygdalus)
With no scent of its own, sweet almond oil is mild and well tolerated by most people.
—Use this oil by itself or blend it with other carrier oils.
—A good base for massage oil.
Use caution if you have nut allergies.
Make sure you have sweet almond oil, not bitter almond. 
....................
ROSE-HIP SEED OIL (Rosa rubiginosa)
Rose-hip seed oil is like liquid velvet. It especially nourishes and benefits the skin.
— Use this oil by itself or blend it with other carrier oils.
— Good for facial oil blend.
.................
AVOCADO OIL (Persea nubigena, P. americana)
Excellent as a softener for hair and skin, avocado oil absorbs nicely and is rich in vitamins A and B.
— Use 10-30 percent avocado oil with other carrier oils. 
— Good for body or bath oil.
....................
JOJOBA OIL (Simmondsia chinensis)
Jojoba is actually a liquid wax; it resembles our own skin sebum. Hair, nails and skin respond well to it. Jojoba also gives a longer shelf life to products, perfect for blending into more expensive oils.
— Use up to 95 percent jojoba oil with other carrier oils.
— Good for sea salt scrubs, massage oils.
..........................
.
ESSENTIAL OIL RECIPES
.
Refreshing Massage Oil
3 drops bergamot
2 drops grapefruit
3 drops rosewood
— Add oils to 1 ounce of base oil and mix well.
— Store in a dark glass bottle and avoid exposure to heat, light and air.
This blend can provide a refreshing boost when you’re feeling weary... neither over-stimulating or sedating.
-
Return-to-Earth
Foot Massage Oil

3 drops patchouli
3 drops sandalwood
4 drops lavender
— Add oils to 1 ounce of base oil and mix well.
— Store in a dark glass bottle and avoid exposure to heat, light and air.
This deep, rich, earthy blend is a perfect foot massage oil for those times when life leaves you up in the air. These pure essential oils are believed to be relaxing, centering and calming.
...............................................
- For the original article, check out http://www.care2.com/greenliving/mood-menders.html

Visibility: Everyone
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted: Jul 19, 2009 3:48pm

 

 
 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.

Author

Jenny Dooley
, 3, 2 children
Eastlakes, SW, Australia
Shares by Type:
All (348) | Blog (298) | Alert (14) | Top 10 List (1) | Recipe (8) | Photo (1) | Tribute (1) | Message (25)

Showing shares tagged with: naturalremedies [show all]
SHARES FROM JENNY'S NETWORK
Mar
31
(1 comments  |  discussions )
\\nZEN was suspended by Eric with no warning. We don\\\'t know any reasons nor how long it will last....\\r\\nI asked about it on the forum but my post was immediately deleted. 2 threads and petitions about Zen also. And 2 her help-groups. :-(\\r\\nUntill to...
Feb
18
(0 comments  |  discussions )
Look Grandma I can stand!!
(0 comments  |  discussions )
Bath time is FUN time!!
(0 comments  |  discussions )
I love it when someone reads too me!!
(0 comments  |  discussions )
Just pink!!  I am the best Valentine you could have! Think Pink!
(0 comments  |  discussions )
Ally Jo my little Valentine.
(0 comments  |  discussions )
Look out!!  This guy just got his drivers permit!  Nathan, I am proud of you sweetheart! My first grandchild driving!
(0 comments  |  discussions )
This is my oldest daughter and her son. My Grandson!
(0 comments  |  discussions )
\\r\\nCOME TO: \\r\\nTucson\\\' s 32nd Annual Peace Fair and Music Festival2014 Theme: Climate JusticeThis FREE event is Arizona\\\'s largest gathering of Peace, Justice, and Environmental groups, with Live Music, Tables, Food, Entertainment, Children\\\'s ...
by Barb K.
(0 comments  |  0 discussions )
\\n\\r\\nHello my C2 Family, \\r\\nFirst let me say Thank You to those of you who have so sweetly fwd my posts. You are SO AWESOME!! I will never forget your help. Anytime I can repay the favour, please tell me. Second, my Submit button has disappeared lea...