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Apr 25, 2012

SIX FOODS THAT WEAKEN BONES
Adapted from an article by By Melanie Haiken, Caring.com

Some ingredients actually leach the minerals right out of the bone, or they block the bone’s ability to regrow. Learn about Salt, Soft Drinks, Caffeine, Hydrogenated Oils, Vitamin D, and Alcohol.


1. Salt
Salt saps calcium from the bones, weakening them over time.
One study compared postmenopausal women who ate a high-salt diet with those who didn’t, and the ones who ate a lot of salt lost more bone minerals. Most people on a western diet ingest double what they should have daily... Key foods to avoid: processed and deli meats, frozen meals, canned soup, pizza,
burgers and fries and canned vegetables.
.
2. Soft Drinks
Soft drinks pose a double-danger to bones. The fizziness in carbonated drinks often comes from phosphoric acid, which ups the rate at which calcium is excreted in the urine. Meanwhile, soft drinks fill you up and satisfy your thirst without providing any of the nutrients you might get from milk or juice.
.
3. Caffeine
Caffeine’s action is similar to salt (but not as bad), leaching calcium from bones. For every 100 milligrams of caffeine (the amount in a small to medium-sized cup of coffee), you lose 6 milligrams of calcium. ... can become a problem if you tend to substitute drinks like iced tea and coffee for beverages that are healthy for bones, like milk and fortified juice.
.
4. Vitamin A
...Found in eggs, full-fat dairy, liver, and vitamin-fortified foods, vitamin A is important for vision and the immune system. ...it’s possible to get much more than the recommended allotment... Postmenopausal women, in particular, seem to be susceptible to vitamin A overload. Studies show that women whose intake was higher...had more than double the fracture rate of women whose intake was more sensible.
.
5. Alcohol
..a calcium-blocker; it prevents the bone-building minerals you eat from being absorbed. And heavy drinking disrupts the bone remodeling process by preventing osteoblasts, the bone-building cells, from doing their job. ...not only do bones become weaker, but when you do suffer a fracture, alcohol can interfere with healing.
.
6. Hydrogenated oils
...the process of hydrogenation, which turns liquid vegetable oil into the solid oils used in commercial baking, destroys the vitamin K found in the oils.
Vitamin K is essential for strong bones
. Sources are green leafy vegetables, and
a little from canola and olive oil. If you’re eating your greens, you don’t need to worry about this too much.
Avoid baked goods like muffins and cookies, and read labels to avoid hydrogenated oils.
.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/6-foods-that-weaken-bones.html?page=1

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Posted: Apr 25, 2012 5:58am
Aug 26, 2010

WHY WATER MATTERS

Even healthy eaters often underestimate the importance of their water intake and wind up suffering from chronic, low-grade dehydration. Here are a few reasons good hydration is essential to good health:

ENERGY: Suboptimal hydration slows the activity of enzymes, including those responsible for producing energy, leading to feelings of fatigue. Even a slight reduction in hydration can lower metabolism and reduce your ability to exercise efficiently.

DIGESTION: Our bodies produce an average of 7 litres of digestive juices daily. When we don’t drink enough liquid, our secretions are more limited and the digestive process is inhibited. (Note that drinking too much water all at once, particularly with food, can also dilute digestive juices, reducing their efficacy and leading to indigestion.)

REGULARITY: As partially digested food passes through the colon, the colon absorbs excess liquid and transfers it to the bloodstream so that a stool of normal consistency is formed. When the body is low on water, it extracts too much liquid from the stool, which then becomes hard, dry and difficult to eliminate. Slowed elimination contributes to bodywide toxicity and inflammation.

BLOOD PRESSURE: When we are chronically dehydrated, our blood becomes thicker and more viscous. Additionally, in response to reduced overall blood volume, the blood vessels contract. To compensate for the increased vein-wall tension and increased blood viscosity, the body must work harder to push blood through the veins, resulting in elevated blood pressure.

STOMACH HEALTH: Under normal circumstances, the stomach secretes a layer of mucus (which is composed of 98 percent water) to prevent its mucus membranes from being destroyed by the highly acidic digestive fluid it produces. Chronic dehydration, though, impedes mucus production and may irritate and produce ulcers in the stomach lining.

RESPIRATION: The moist mucus membranes in the respiratory region are protective; however, in a state of chronic dehydration, they dry out and become vulnerable to attack from substances that might exist in inhaled air, such as dust and pollen.

ACID-ALKALINE BALANCE: Dehydration causes enzymatic slowdown, interrupting important biochemical transformations, with acidifying results at the cellular level. The acidification of the body’s internal cellular environment can be further worsened when excretory organs responsible for eliminating acids (e.g., the skin and kidneys) don’t have enough liquid to do their jobs properly. An overly acidic biochemical environment can give rise to a host of inflammatory health conditions, as well as yeast and fungus growth.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT: Feelings of thirst can be confused with hunger, both because eating can soothe thirst and also because dehydration-induced fatigue is often misinterpreted as a lack of fuel (e.g., sugar). Both dynamics can lead to false sensations of hunger, triggering overeating and weight gain. Inadequate hydration can also promote the storage of inflammatory toxins, which can also promote weight gain.

SKIN HEALTH: Dehydrated skin loses elasticity and has a dry, flaky appearance and texture. But dehydration can also lead to skin irritation and rashes, including conditions like eczema. We need to sweat about 24 ounces a day to properly dilute and transport the toxins being eliminated through our skin. When we are chronically dehydrated, the sweat becomes more concentrated and toxins aren’t removed from our systems as readily, which can lead to skin irritation and inflammation.

CHOLESTEROL: Cholesterol is an essential element in cell membrane construction. When we are in a state of chronic dehydration and too much liquid is removed from within the cell walls, the body tries to stop the loss by producing more cholesterol to shore up the cell membrane. Although the cholesterol protects the cell membrane from being so permeable, the overproduction introduces too much cholesterol into the bloodstream.

KIDNEY and URINARY HEALTH: When we don’t drink enough liquid, our kidneys struggle to flush water-soluble toxins from our system. When we don’t adequately dilute the toxins in our urine, the toxins irritate the urinary mucus membranes and create a germ and infection-friendly environment.

JOINT HEALTH: Dehydrated cartilage and ligaments are more brittle and prone to damage. Joints can also become painfully inflamed when irritants, usually toxins produced by the body and concentrated in our blood and cellular fluids, attack them, setting the stage for arthritis.

AGEING: The normal ageing process involves a gradual loss of cell volume and an imbalance of the extracellular and intracellular fluids. This loss of cellular water can be accelerated when we don’t ingest enough liquids, or when our cell membranes aren’t capable of maintaining a proper fluid balance.
Related: Hydration Tips 
Related: Common Myths about Dehydration

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Posted: Aug 26, 2010 6:49pm
Aug 17, 2010

Naturally Protect Your Skin From Mosquito Bites


Taken from Care2's 'Daily Action':
Before you head for the hills or enjoy an outdoor evening BBQ, think twice about using DEET-based mosquito repellents.
Research shows that regular use of chemical repellents like DEET can:

  • Damage brain cells and Interact with medications.
  • Cause brain cell death and behavioural changes- as observed in animals exposed to DEET after frequent and prolonged use. *
  • Result in up to 15% of DEET being absorbed by the skin into the bloodstream.

Learn from Michelle Schoffro Cook how you can protect yourself and your loved ones from mosquitoes without covering your skin in dangerous chemicals.
Mosquito-Free Naturally
Here are some of Michelle's recommendations for natural mosquito repellents: (N.B. see details on each via the link supplied)
- Citronella
- Soy oil
- Catnip
- NEEM seed oil
- Lavender essential oil
- Garlic
Michelle Schoffro Cook, BSc, RNCP, ROHP, DNM
.
*This of course means that animals in laboratories suffered 'frequent and prolonged' cruel experiments.
I implore you not to reward the people making money from DEET products with your custom. 
It is your choice... you can:

  • STOP MAKING SUCH PEOPLE RICH;
  • STOP DECREASING YOUR OWN QUALITY OF LIFE.
Jul 27, 2010

Enjoy Soy: Dr. Debunks Scaremonger Stories, Says Soy Beneficial For People And The Planet
Blog posted by Heather Moore

.
If you avoid eating soy-based foods, including tofu, tempeh, edamame, veggie burgers, and soy milk because you've heard reports claiming that soy products are responsible for everything from "man-boobs" and cancer to deforestation you might be interested in the recent Guardian article urging people to ignore all the scaremonger stories and eat more soy.
It seems that most anti-soy stories can be traced back to Weston A Price Foundation (WAPF), a group that claims that saturated animal fat is essential for good health, animal fat intake and high cholesterol levels aren't connected to heart disease or cancer, vegetarians have lower life expectancy than meat-eaters, and other pro-meat propaganda that contradicts leading health experts, not to mention basic common sense.
One of WAPF's more ardent supporters, Dr. Stephen Byrnes, openly boasted about his high animal fat diet and robust health—until he died of a stroke at 42.
Much of what the WAPF says is anecdotal, untrue, or based on scientifically flawed animal experiments, points out Dr. Justine Butler, a health campaigner for the Vegetarian & Vegan Foundation.
There is no scientific evidence showing that soy is harmful to humans, yet the groundless scare stories about soy continue. When Dr. Butler was interviewed for BBC Radio London, for example, the presenter asked her if soy foods were safe, then "fell about laughing saying he didn't want to grow man-boobs."
Now, I'm just guessing here, but I bet he wasn't equally concerned about developing gynecomastia—the clinical term for man-boobs or "moobs"—from eating meat and dairy products, even though many physicians believe that the conditions is caused by the estrogen-mimicking chemicals in these foods. (Factory-farmed animals are fed growth-promoting hormones that accumulate in fat tissue and are taken up by the estrogen receptor sites in the body. Hormone-treated cow’s milk, for instance, contains high levels of Insulin Growth Factor (IGF-1), which studies show can cause gynecomastia.)

In fact, many of the people who have asked me about soy in the past think nothing of chowing down on hamburgers and cheese pizza. Soy may not be a "miracle food," because there really is no such thing, but unlike meat, eggs, and dairy products, soy is cholesterol-free, low in saturated fat, and has cardiovascular benefits.

Researchers with the Cancer Center at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute have found evidence suggesting that eating soy can help ward off colon cancer, and soy is also known to prevent prostate and breast cancer. Research shows that women who eat soy, especially early in life, are 30 percent less likely to develop breast cancer, compared with women who eat little or no soy products. For women who’ve already been diagnosed with breast cancer, eating soy may actually help reduce their risk of a recurrence.

Research also shows that soy consumption can help prevent strokes, that menopausal women who eat soy may have fewer hot flashes, and that soy consumption can protect against osteoporosis. A study from Clinical and Experimental Allergy suggests that the antioxidants in soy may also benefit asthma sufferers.
.

And for those who've heard that soy production destroys the Amazonian rain forest, Dr. Butler rightfully points out that the problem is not people eating soy; it's that 80% of the world's soy is fed to farmed animals so that people can eat meat and dairy products.

So, while there's no need to go overboard by drinking soy-infused water and the like, go ahead and enjoy soy. It's not only healthy and humane, it's versatile and delicious. As Dr. Butler concludes, both the rain forests and our health will benefit tremendously if more people switch from animal-based foods to a varied plant-based diet, including soy foods.

 

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Read more: health, vegan, vegetarian, environment, soy, real food

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Posted: Jul 27, 2010 11:53am
Apr 19, 2010

  "I don’t know if laughter is the best medicine, but it is certainly good medicine.
  "There is a lot of talk these days about positive attitude and how essential it is to coping with chronic illness. That is true, but I would add that a sense of humor may be just as important. The ability to laugh at our own foibles and missteps is sometimes just the tonic we need.
  "I can come up with dozens of examples of multiple sclerosis imposing on my life in a frustrating way, and quite a few instances where strangers have had a laugh at my expense. That’s no fun but, hey, that’s life."

From If Laughter is the Best Medicine, I'll Be Fine | Care2 Healthy & Green Living posted by Ann Pietrangelo
(Photos added from my
Album: LAUGHTER)
The article continues:
...Then there’s the time when having MS became the excuse that got me out of an absurdly awkward situation worthy of a sitcom.
  My husband and I were visiting London on business, but we had several lovely social functions on our agenda. This particular evening, we were scheduled to attend a cocktail party at a small art museum. I was beside myself with excitement as I slipped my little black dress over my head and shoulders. It felt a little tight as called out for my husband to zip me up. That excitement quickly turned to panic as he let loose with a soft whistle and I realized that the dress, when zipped, barely made it over my backside! Oh, why hadn’t I tried it on before packing? Just a few months ago it looked so darling on me. Amazing what two or three few pounds can do. All right, maybe five.
 So there I stood in my awkwardly high heels (another foolish error on my part), leaning on my cane, and wearing a dress that was straining at the seams. We weren't about to let that stop us, so we optimistically headed out into the winter chill to hail a cab. As if having MS and walking with a cane and high heels weren't challenging enough, the tight dress exaggerated my odd gait to the point of ridiculousness.
 Arriving at the museum, I carefully situated myself with my back to the wall, doing everything in my power to avoid mingling. There were very few seats around, so when a chair became available, I sat down- warily- hoping I wouldn't split my dress open and expose my backside in the process. I could almost feel the groaning of the tiny threads holding it all together. While hubby mingled, I sat. 
 Eventually it was announced that the unveiling of a particular piece of art — the reason for the whole affair — would take place on the second floor, and would all attendees please follow the guide upstairs. Stairs? We inquire as to the location of an elevator. No elevator? This is a definite turn for the worse.
 With my MS acting up, there was no way I could possibly make it up that long, wooden staircase in this ill-fitting dress and high heels without attracting curious eyes straight to my behind. I could almost hear the sound of fabric tearing and everybody turning to laugh and stare. As it was, I was beginning to giggle at my own situation. And when I laugh, I tend to also shed tears. I was beginning to feel quite conspicuous.
 I informed my hubby in no uncertain terms that I would remain glued to the chair regardless of what he or anybody else does or says. Up to this point he had been good-naturedly playing along with me, and now was barely containing his own laughter.
 The moment the last of the party-goers made it to the top of the stairs, we both burst into laughter at my predicament. Courteous museum staff, spotting the cane, inquire about my difficulty with the stairs. "Multiple sclerosis" we tell them in serious voices. Tears are falling from my eyes now, due to suppressed laughter, but no doubt mistaken for despair. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres were delivered with sympathetic smiles directly to our lonely corner. Now I really felt bad… and guilty… and silly. Embarrassed and unable to control my laughing/crying, we took advantage of a moment alone and skulked out the door first chance we got.
 It was a fabulous week in London, but that misadventure remains one of my fondest memories. If laughter truly is the best medicine, I'm going to be just fine.
--------------------------------
Writer Ann Pietrangelo embraces the
concept of personal responsibility for
health and wellness. As a person living
with multiple sclerosis, she combines
a healthy lifestyle and education
with modern medicine, and seeks
to provide information and support
to others. A regular contributor to
Care2 Causes.
Follow on Twitter
@AnnPietrangelo

Jan 11, 2010
Information about stress in childhood
Childhood stress can be caused by any situation that requires a person to adapt or change. The situation often produces anxiety. Stress may be caused by positive changes, such as starting a new activity, but it is most commonly linked with negative changes such as illness or death in the family.
Stress is a response to any situation or factor that creates a negative emotional or physical change or both. People of all ages can experience stress.
In small quantities, stress is good -- it can motivate you and help you be more productive.
However, excessive stress can interfere with life, activities, and health. Stress can affect the way people think, act, and feel.
Children learn how to respond to stress by what they have seen and experienced in the past. Most stresses experienced by children may seem insignificant to adults, but because children have few previous experiences from which to learn, even situations that require small changes can have enormous impacts on a child's feelings of safety and security.
MAJOR STRESSORS FOR CHILDREN:
Pain, injury, and illness.

Medical treatments produce even greater stress.
Recognition of parental stress
e.g.divorce, financial crisis
Death or loss of a loved one.
.
SIGNS OF UNRESOLVED STRESS IN CHILDREN
=> Physical symptoms
=> Decreased appetite, other changes in eating habits
=> Headache
=> New or recurrent bedwetting
=> Nightmares
=> Sleep disturbances
=> Stuttering
=> Upset stomach or vague stomach pain
=> Other physical symptoms with no physical illness
=> Emotional or behavioural symptoms
=> Anxiety
=> Worries
=> Inability to relax
=> New or recurring fears (fear of the dark,
     fear of being alone, fear of strangers)
=> Clinging, unwilling to let you out of sight
=> Questioning 
=> Anger
=> Crying
=> Whining
=> Inability to control emotions
=> Aggressive behaviour
=> Stubborn behaviour
=> Regression to behaviours that are typical of an earlier developmental stage
=> Unwillingness to participate in family or school activities
.
HOW PARENTS CAN HELP
Parents can help children respond to stress in healthy ways. e.g.:
=> Provide a safe, secure, familiar, consistent, and dependable home.
=> Be selective in the television programs that young children watch (including news broadcasts), which can produce fears and anxiety.
=> Spend calm, relaxed time with your children.
=> Encourage your child to ask questions.
=> Encourage expression of concerns, worries, or fears.
=> Listen to your child without being critical.
=> Build your child's feelings of self-worth.
     Use encouragement and affection.
     Try to involve your child in situations where he or she can succeed.
=> Try to use positive encouragement and reward instead of punishment.
=> Allow the child opportunities to make choices and have some control in his or her life. This is particularly important, because research shows that the more people feel they have control over a situation, the better their response to stress will be.
=> Encourage physical activity.
=> Develop awareness of situations and events that are stressful for children. These include:
  -- new experiences,
  -- fear of unpredictable outcomes,
  -- unpleasant sensations,
  -- unmet needs or desires, 
  -- loss.
=> Recognize signs of unresolved stress in your child.
=> Keep your child informed of necessary and anticipated changes such as changes in jobs or moving
=> Seek professional help or advice when signs of stress do not decrease or disappear.
.
WHAT CHILDREN CAN DO TO RELIEVE STRESS
An open, accepting flow of communication in families helps to reduce anxiety and depression in children. Encourage your children to discuss their emotions and help them discuss simple ways to change the stressful situation or their response to it.
Below are some tips that children can follow themselves to help reduce stress:
=> Talk about your problems. 
     If you cannot communicate with your parents,
     try someone else that you can trust.
=> Relax. Listen to calm music.
     Take a warm bath. Close your eyes and
     take slow deep breaths.
=> Take some time for yourself.
     If you have a hobby or favourite activity,
     give yourself time to enjoy it.
=> Exercise. Physical activity reduces stress.
=> Set realistic expectations. Do your best, and
     remember that nobody is perfect.
=> Learn to love and respect yourself.
=> Respect others. Be with people who accept
     and respect you.
=> Drugs and alcohol never solve problems.
=> Ask for help if you are having problems
     managing your stress.
._____________________________________
original article: here.
related articles:
Childhood stress contributes to adult depression...click
here 
Early Childhood Stress Has Lingering Effects On Health [ScienceDaily]...click
here
[C2NN] Abused Kids More Prone to Migraines in Adulthood
click here

 

 
 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.

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Jenny Dooley
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