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Jul 20, 2010

This story started in Afghanistan and ended in the USA. Two U.S. marines found cute kitties while they were serving in South-Central Asia. People and cats became great friends, and now both animals live in America with their owners. Kitten named Kiki has moved to Houston, Texas. The other one named KeyKey lives in Detroit, Michigan. Isn’t this story cute?


Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)

Afghanistan Kittens Move to the USA (21  pics)


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Posted: Jul 20, 2010 6:34am
Mar 28, 2010

The white bird that's a bit of a black sheep: Twitcher snaps an ALBINO blackbird

28th March 2010


A householder snapped a very unusual visitor to her garden - a white blackbird.

Fiona Crofts spotted the rare albino bird sitting on the fence in her garden in Deeping, near Peterborough.

Avid bird watcher Fiona said in six years of 'twitching' it was the first time she had ever seen anything like it.

Fiona, 26, said: 'At first I thought it was a dove, so I ran to put my glasses on, but it wasn't until I got a closer look I realised it was actually a blackbird.

White blackbird

Light fantastic: The incredibly rare albino blackbird pictured by Fiona Crofts in her back garden

'I couldn't believe it, I was quite shocked I've never seen a completely white blackbird before, that's for sure.' 

Fiona watched and took photos of the bird for around five minutes before it flew away.

She said it must have been a fleeting visit, as she has not seen her feathered friend since.

Erica Howe, from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSP, said she was certain the bird was an albino blackbird, which are very rare in the wild.

But she said, being pale an interesting meant the bird did not have an easy time surviving in the wild.

She said: 'The problem albino blackbirds have is that they stand out quite a lot.

White blackbird

All white: Albinism occurs in more than 160 species of birds in Britain and tends to be genetic passed on from parents

'This means they are vulnerable to predators such as cats, foxes and larger birds of prey and are easily targeted.

'Albinism occurs in more than 160 species of birds in Britain and tends to be genetic passed on from parents.

'Nearly a third of albino birds in Britain are thrushes and blackbirds, but they are very rare.

'There are different levels of albinism in blackbirds. Some are completely white, while others have only a few white patches or feathers.'

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Posted: Mar 28, 2010 7:25am
Mar 26, 2010

Catch me if you can: How Wile E Coyote gave New York's finest the runaround


 26th March 2010



 


For a while it looked as though she'd outwitted the fire-power and resources of New York's finest but in the end there was no escape.


Dubbed Wile E Coyote, after the cartoon character, the 30lb female coyote was first spotted emerging from Holland Tunnel into Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon before darting into traffic.


The tunnel connects the island of Manhattan in New York City with New Jersey on the mainland.


Drivers and passersby alerted police and up to 20 officers were dispatched, some with tranquilizer guns, to catch the one-year-old female.





'Wiley' coyote


On the run: The coyote shortly after she was first spotted emerging from the Holland Tunnel into Manhattan



 'Wiley' coyote


Cornered? Officers with tranquilizer guns were sent out to catch the coyote


'I thought it was a little wolf,' said 18-year-old painter Demetrius Jones. 'It looked scared.'


At one point they thought she was cornered in the TriBeca neighbourhood but she made another break for freedom and wasn't spotted again until yesterday.


Officers tracked her down to an open air car park at the corner of Watts Street and the West Side Highway. She was spotted hiding under a vehicle.


This time they managed to fire a tranquiliser dart into her before she got away again. The coyote was then taken away in a pet carrier to a rescue centre.


Detective James Coll, of New York's Emergency Service Unit, said: 'Our unit trains for any number of eventualities in the community. We do come across some strange things in the city but this one of the things that make this city as great as it is.'



coyote


Laying low: The coyote looks out from under a car as officers move in to catch her


 



A 'Wiley' coyote


I'm off: The coyote darted through traffic and escaped the officers pursuing her


 


'I thought it was a little wolf,' said 18-year-old painter Demetrius Jones. 'It looked scared.'


At one point they thought she was cornered in the TriBeca neighbourhood but she made another break for freedom and wasn't spotted again until yesterday.


Officers tracked her down to an open air car park at the corner of Watts Street and the West Side Highway. She was spotted hiding under a vehicle.


This time they managed to fire a tranquiliser dart into her before she got away again. The coyote was then taken away in a pet carrier to a rescue centre.


Detective James Coll, of New York's Emergency Service Unit, said: 'Our unit trains for any number of eventualities in the community. We do come across some strange things in the city but this one of the things that make this city as great as it is.'


Animal welfare officials will observe the animal before deciding where to take it. It is not sure whether the coyote came via the tunnel from New Jersey or was trying to head out of the city.



new york police


I need back-up! First time round the coyote made good her escape but a day later officers captured the one-year-old


 






 Coyote on the loose


Armed with tranquiliser guns, 20 officers were sent out to capture the coyote. The female was taken to an animal rescue centre after her capture, right



It is the fourth time this year a coyote has been spotted in 'downtown' Manhattan. In February, three coyotes were spotted on the Columbia University campus.


As unusual as it sounds, coyotes do live in New York City and in larger numbers outside the city limits.Wile E Coyote



The much-loved cartoon character Wile E Coyote



There is even an established coyote population in Van Cortlandt Park which lies in the Bronx, to the north of Manhattan.


After 'Wile E' has been assessed she may even be released there as other captured coyotes have been, says the Bronx Ink website.


In 1998, a statue was put up at one of the park’s entrances in honour of 'the first confirmed coyote sighting in New York City since 1946'.


A 2006 report on coyotes noted that they have 'been present in New York state at least since 1920, as they extended their range eastward after wolves became extinct in the eastern U.S. and southern portions of Canada'.


The professor who carried out the survey estimated there were between 20,000 and 30,000 coyotes living in New York state.


New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation explains on its website that coyotes are 'firmly establised in New York'.


Under the 'Coyote Conflicts' heading it adds: 'People and coyotes can usually coexist if the natural fear of people that coyotes have is maintained.'


It points out that across the U.S. there are only a handful of coyote attacks each year, while on average 650 people are hospitalised and one person is killed by dogs each year in New York State.


But for cat owners it adds the following, somewhat tricky, advice 'keep it indoors, or allow it outside only under supervision'.


This is because: 'Coyotes in some areas appear to become "specialists" at catching and killing cats.'


Furthermore, owners of small dogs have cause for concern: 'Very small dogs, e.g., small poodles, are viewed by coyotes as easy prey and are at risk to be killed year round.'



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Posted: Mar 26, 2010 9:15am
Mar 24, 2010

 

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Posted: Mar 24, 2010 2:34pm
Mar 24, 2010

From strays to first-class pets: Dogs and cats abandoned at Battersea home become photogenic stars of new stamps

11th March 2010

 

 

They didn't exactly smile for the camera.

But there was lots of tail wagging, tongue lolling and contented purring when these models got together.

Some even managed that classic pose of cocking their head to one side with an earnest gaze.

No wonder they were happy. After a rather tough start to life each and every one of this whiskered brigade has fallen on their feet, or rather paws.

Tia reenacts her playful pose captured by a photographer for the new Royal Mail stamps

Look, I can do it again! Tia the nine-year-old terrier reenacts her playful pose captured by a photographer for the new Royal Mail stamps. She was adopted by a family in Berkshire when she was five months old

And all have the famous Battersea Dogs & Cats Home in London to thank for putting them on the path to a happy ever after.

These former Battersea residents, all happily living with new owners, star in a set of first-class stamps to mark the home's 150th anniversary.

They were once among the 12,000 animals the charity takes in a year.

The charity began life as the Temporary Home for Lost and Starving Dogs in Holloway, North London, back in 1860.

The eye-catching stamps celebrate 150 years of the Battersea Dogs & Cats Home

First class act: The eye-catching stamps celebrate 150 years of the Battersea Dogs & Cats Home. Clockwise from top, Pixie, Button, Herbie, Mr Tumnus, Tafka, Tia, Leonard, Tigger, Casey and Boris

It was 11 years later that it moved south to Battersea and in 1883 that it started taking in cats.

And one hundred and fifty years since its formation, it remains true to its simple message: 'We aim never to turn away a dog or cat in need of our help.'

Julietta  Edgar, Head of Special Stamps, Royal Mail said: 'Stamps featuring animals have always been extremely popular with collectors and non-collectors alike, and I think these wonderfully charming and expressive images  are  a  great way to mark the achievements of Battersea Dogs & Cats Home.'

Howard Bridges, Chief Executive of Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, said: 'Everyone at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home is thrilled that the final images truly capture the character of the animals chosen.'


Here are the ten photogenic pets who have been selected to appear on the 150th birthday stamps: HERBIE

The seven-year-old mongrel arrived at the home as a puppy in 2002 but was soon adopted and now has a new canine pal in Tafka, to whom he is teaching some flyball tricks - a kind of relay running game for dogs.

TAFKA

This playful seven-year-old border collie arrived at Battersea in 2008 when his owner died. Now living with a new owner in Berkshire, Tafka may soon be representing Battersea in the doggy game of flyball, as well as in the rescue agility team. Tafka and Herbie live together.

Herbie, left, and fellow canine Tafka sit patiently beside their own stamps

Furry housemates: Herbie, left, and fellow canine Tafka sit patiently beside their own stamps

LEONARD

The terrier was discovered as an underweight and timid stray in Essex but after two weeks of tender loving care he bounded off to a new home in Maidenhead, Berkshire. When his owner first saw Leonard at the Battersea home he was cowering  at  the back of his kennel with his huge ears held back.

Leonard the terrier, admires his face on a 1st class stamp

Looking good: Leonard the terrier, admires his face on a 1st class stamp

Mr Tumnus
MR TUMNUS

The two-year-old (right) was born at Battersea with his two sisters when his mother was brought in because her owner could no longer care for her.

Now Mr Tumnus is living with sister Lucy and new owners in London where he is often found observing life from a shelf in the kitchen.

CASEY

The loveable lurcher needed a new home when his owner was too ill to care for him.

But he quickly charmed his 'foster' carer who has since adopted him.

He lives in Surrey where he enjoys long walks, chasing toys - and squirrels.

Casey was soon adopted by his foster parent and now loves long walks in Surrey

All charm: Casey was soon adopted by his foster parent and now loves long walks in Surrey

TIGGER

A Golden oldie, the male tabby needed a new home when his owner died and found one after two months. Tigger lives in London and loves lazing in the sun and strolling around the garden. He now demands to be let out every morning for his daily walk around the flower-beds and  jumps on everyone’s lap as soon as they sit down. He loves sleeping under the duvet, lazing in the sun and tucking into any ham that might come his way.

BUTTON

The five-year-old ginger tomcat arrived at the cattery when his owners could no longer care for him. But he stayed just a few days before he moved on to a new home in Hampshire where he loves to play with anything he can chase, and enjoys the occasional treat.

Tigger, a tomcat
Button, a tomcat

Tomcat mates: For veteran Tigger, left, modelling for Royal Mail is serious business. But it's a stretch and roll around for Button, who just loves to play with anything he can chase

PIXIE

The mastiff arrived at the home as a tiny stray puppy and was fostered to adjust to the home environment. The foster carer fell in love with Pixie and gave her a permanent home in East Sussex.

Pixie, the mastif, sits proudly with her stamp

Willing to please: Pixie, the mastiff, sits proudly with her stamp

TIA

The nine-year-old terrier was adopted by a family in Berkshire when she was five months old and has since encouraged a string of foster dogs waiting for new homes.

Tia the terrier sits upright for her all-important stamp photoshoot

Best behaviour: Tia the terrier sits upright for her all-important stamp photoshoot

BORIS

The bulldog with the woeful expression was a stray when he arrived at the home in 2007 with a very bad skin condition. Now fully recovered he lives with adoptive owners in London.

Despite his woeful expression, Boris is now a happy bulldog after finding a permanent home in London

Don't look so glum: Despite his woeful expression, Boris is now a happy bulldog after finding a permanent home in London

Four-legged friends: Top row (left to right) Tigger, a tomcat; Tafka, a collie; Herbie, a mongrel; Mr Tumnus, a tomcat; Casey, a lurcher; Leonard, a terrier; Bottom row (left to right) Pixie, a mastiff; Tia, a terrier; Boris, a bulldog and Button, a tomcat

All together now: Top row (left to right) Tigger, a tomcat; Tafka, a collie; Herbie, a mongrel; Mr Tumnus, a tomcat; Casey, a lurcher; Leonard, a terrier; Bottom row (left to right) Pixie, a mastiff; Tia, a terrier; Boris, a bulldog and Button, a tomcat

 

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Posted: Mar 24, 2010 2:22pm
Mar 16, 2010

Pictured: The cute dormouse blissfully unaware he was saved from the jaws of death

 

A hibernating dormouse curls up in the palm of a hand, blissfully unaware he has just been rescued from almost certain death in sub-zero temperatures.

The tiny animal can only be held for just a few seconds because its carer's warming touch would wake it prematurely.

Dormouse expert Dave Williams saved the three-inch creature from a back garden where he was left exposed to frost, wind and rain.

The hibernating dormouse curls up in the palm of a hand after being rescued from sub-zero temperatures in a back garden

Nap time: The hibernating dormouse curls up in the palm of a hand after being rescued from sub-zero temperatures in a back garden

A gardener accidently raked its woven grass nest from under a box hedge he had trimmed near Leatherhead, Surrey.

It may have died if left exposed to freezing temperatures or struggled to find the seeds, nuts and berries it eats if woken early.

Mr Williams, from Surrey Wildlife Trust, examined the nest and found the mouse was healthy and sleeping inside.

He took it to nearby Wildlife Aid animal sanctuary where the mouse can be monitored and then fed when it wakes around April or May.

 

 

Mr Williams said: 'A gardener was cutting back a box hedge when they noticed this tight ball of grass on the ground.

'They had seen a dormouse earlier in the year by their compost heap and suspected it may be a nest so they covered it with cuttings and called me.

'The mouse was healthy but it was too exposed and I was not prepared to leave it.

'I took the mouse and nest to the Wildlife Aid centre where staff are keeping an eye on it.

'It will have a good supply of fruit, hazelnuts and sunflower seeds when it wakes and once it has been fed up it will be released back into the garden.' 

The hibernating dormouse curls up in the palm of a hand after being rescued from sub-zero temperatures in a back garden

Heartwarming: The tiny creature is being monitored at a wildlife sanctuary until he wakes up around April or May

He added: 'I had to handle the mouse to check it was healthy but you can only touch it for about 30 seconds at a time.

'If it gets too hot it could trick the mouse into thinking spring has come and it will wake from hibernation.

'That is not too serious at the wildlife sanctuary because we can feed it but in the wild it would struggle to find food this early in the year.' 

Wildlife Aid founder Simon Cowell said: 'We want it to come out of hibernation at its own pace and are currently monitoring it from a distance.

'When it comes round we will make sure it has got food and is good to go.' 

Hazel dormice measure six to nine centimetres (2.4 to 3.5 inches) long and weigh 17 to 20 grams (0.60 to 0.71 oz). This weight can double prior to hibernation.

The Hazel dormouse has golden-brown fur and large black eyes and is the only dormouse native to the British Isles.

It is nocturnal and a protected species.

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Posted: Mar 16, 2010 8:57am
Mar 15, 2010

'Extremely rare' white puffin caught on camera

15th March 2010

 

 

This extremely rare white Atlantic Puffin has stunned bird experts after it was spotted playing with its more common black-feathered friends off the British coast.

At first glance the remarkable bird looks like an albino but it has orange eyes and bill and black edges on a few feathers.

It actually has a colouring which is called leucism and is so unusual it was considered mythical by sailors in the 17th Century.

Puffin

All white: This rare white puffin was pictured off the Isles of Scilly by wildlife photographer Barbara Fryer

Albinism is a genetic mutation that prevents the strong black pigment called melanin from forming. With leucism, colour pigments form but are diluted.

Photographer Barbara Fryer, from Umberleigh, Devon, snapped the puffin from a boat that was bobbing around the Isles of Scilly, off the Cornish coast.

She said: 'I love puffins - they are stunning birds and this white one is even more beautiful than most.

'I've seen many puffin colonies across the UK over the past ten years and have never seen a white one before. Nobody I know has ever seen a white one either.

'We had been out every day that week taking photos of puffins and we saw the white one on the last day.

'It was lovely to see it swimming underwater and I am thrilled to have got the shots I wanted in quite difficult conditions.

Puffins

Play time: Pictured alongside one of its more common black-feathered friends

'The white puffin was sitting on the water as we were floating near rocks, watching adults return to their nests to feed their young.

'It played around with the other puffins for about 15 minutes before flying away. They didn't seem to mind it's unusual colour and treated it like a good friend.

'Sadly, once it flew off we never saw it again.'  Bird expert Peter Robinson, who has worked on the BBC Springwatch programme and for the RSPB for 25 years, said the white puffin was extemely rare.

He said: 'I lived on the Isles of Scilly for 12 years and worked ringing puffins in Scotland for a season and have never even heard of a white puffin let alone seen one.

'It's a stunning photograph and wonderful bird. The contrast between the orange bill and white feathers is particularly amazing.

'I imagine it looks splendid in full flight.'  Atlantic Puffins, or Fratercula arctica, measure 12.5 inches long, have a wingspan of 21 inches and weigh around 13 ounces.

They are widely distributed across the North Atlantic for most of the year and only come ashore to breed.

During this time the plumage changes so they have dusky cheeks and smaller darker bills.

The colourful plates are lost after breeding and only regrow as spring approaches.

They eat fish and flap their wings up to 400 times per minute.

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Posted: Mar 15, 2010 8:47am
Mar 14, 2010
A small poem - the bee by Emily Dickinson 

The Bee
by Emily Dickinson

Like trains of cars on tracks of plush
I hear the level bee:
A jar across the flowers goes,
Their velvet masonry
Withstands until the sweet assault
Their chivalry consumes,
While she, victorious, tilts away
To vanquish other blooms.
Her feet are shod with gauze,
Her helmet is of gold;
Her breast, a single onyx
With chrysoprase, inlaid.
Her labor is a chant,
Her idleness a tune;
Oh, for a bee's experience
Of clovers and of noon!



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Posted: Mar 14, 2010 9:38pm
Mar 13, 2010

Our paradise lost: Revealed, the 492 native species driven to extinction

12th March 2010

 

 

 

It is being called the sixth great extinction.

Nearly 500 species of plant and animal native to England have been wiped out in the past 2,000 years - with most vanishing in the previous two centuries alone.

The roll-call, detailed in a shocking report, includes mammals such as the wildcat and northern right whale, birds such as the great auk and red-backed shrike, and species of butterflies, dragonflies and beetles.

Some creatures, including the bear, were hunted to extinction after the Romans invaded, while others, such as the short-haired bumblebee, were killed off by modern farming techniques during the 1990s.

Wildlife of England graphic


A handful of the extinct species were unique to England and can never be brought back, the report by Natural England, which advises the Government on environmental issues, warns.

Its audit - the first- ever of native wildlife - also found that a quarter of English species are declining rapidly or threatened.

Dr Tom Tew, Natural England's chief scientist, said the Lost Life report - drawing on records going back two millennia - presented a stark message about England's wildlife.

Kentish plover

Under threat: The Kentish plover became extinct in 1928 due to loss of habitat and changes to farming and peticides

'The message is clear: We are losing species at an alarming rate and many are seriously threatened,' he said.

Species once described as 'common', such as common sparrows, common frogs and common toads, were now barely seen, he added.

'You don't need to be an "ologist" to understand that when we lose our wildlife we lose something precious that reduces our quality of life,' he said.

'Every species has a role, like the rivets in an aeroplane or bricks in a dam, and the overall structure of the environment is weakened when you lose a species.'

Fossil experts believe that the world has gone through five mass extinctions in its history - caused by events including natural climate change, wobbles in the Earth's orbit and collisions with asteroids.

And, according to some conservationists, the scale of extinction in the past 200 years means we are living through a sixth. The report found evidence that 492 species have been lost in England - with most killed off since 1800.

It includes 24 per cent of all butterflies, 22 per cent of amphibians, 15 per cent of dolphins and whales, and 12 per cent of land mammals.

Some - such as the great auk, often nicknamed the 'original penguin', and Ivell's sea anemone - are no longer alive anywhere in the world.

The study also reveals that 943 English species, including the leatherback turtle and pine martin - are under threat.

And it warns that while a few 'big, hairy and scary' animals such as bears and wolves were hunted to extinction, most of those disappearing are the victims of intensive farming, pollution and pesticides.

Brine shrimp

Under water: Brine shrimp became extinct in 1907, largely as a result of pollution and habitat loss

Over the last few decades, England has lost countless wildflower meadows, ponds, chalklands and peatlands as farmers have changed how they sow crops - depriving birds and insects of winter food.

The loss of woodlands and the neglect of forests and woods has also hit many species, as has the introduction of alien wildlife such as mink and grey squirrels.

Even where species have not become extinct at a national level, many have disappeared from parts of the country, leaving populations fragmented and more at risk from threats including a changing climate.

13 By numbers.jpg

On average, every English county has lost at least one species of plant or animal every two years for the past century.

But the study isn't all gloom and doom. It also found red kites, large blue butterflies and pool frogs have all been successfully re-introduced to the countryside in the past few decades.

And action to improve habitat for species such as bitterns and sand lizards have also helped stem and reverse declines in those animals.

Natural England has now called for a campaign to halt the decline of wildlife and to protect environmental sites from planners.

It also wants a change from protecting individual species to 'restoring the health of ecosystems across entire landscapes'.

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Posted: Mar 13, 2010 7:51am
Mar 13, 2010

Pampered pooches arrive at Crufts in style as they prepare to battle for the 'Best in Show' award

12th March 2010

Preparing for the biggest dog event of the year must be a huge pressure for the canines.

So is it any wonder that owners of the pampered pooches arriving at the Crufts Dog Show 2010 at Birmingham's NEC today ensured their beloved dogs arrived in the most luxurious method of transport possible.

Peeking out from the comfort of their pink doggie buggy, three Shih Tzus seem entirely unaware of their privileged upbringing as they arrive at the event.

A couple pushes a pram containing three Shih Tzus as they arrive for the first day of the Crufts Dog Show in Birmingham

A couple pushes a pram containing three Shih Tzus as they arrive for the first day of the Crufts Dog Show in Birmingham

 

The Shih Tzus peer out of the pram as they arrive at the world-famous event

The Shih Tzus peer out of the pram as they arrive at the world-famous event

However, the price of privilege is certainly not cheap.

The specialist prams, made by designer pet shop Pet London, retail for a staggering £129.99 and also come in blue for more macho pooches.

They come complete with a removable snack tray with dual cup holders and are 'great for all small animals such as dogs, cats & rabbits', according to the store's website.

Another dedicated pet owner pushes her dog in a more masculine blue pram as they arrive for the four-day event

Another dedicated pet owner pushes her dog in a more masculine blue pram as they arrive for the four-day event

 

It's a slightly less comfortable ride for this dog, whose owner transports him to the event in a cage on wheels

It's a slightly less comfortable ride for this dog, whose owner transports him to the event in a cage on wheels

During this year's four-day competition nearly 28,000 dogs and their owners will compete for a variety of awards, with the majority ultimately seeking the coveted 'Best In Show' prize.

However, this year's event had a shaky start, with animal rights protesters complaining that pedigree breeders are 'creating a Frankenstein's monster of a dog'.

Protesters from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) gathered outside the National Exhibition Centre with banners bearing the slogan: 'Hitler Would Be Proud'.

The campaigners also displayed posters featuring a white Maltese dog, pictured with a black comb placed across its upper lip to make it look as if it has an Adolf Hitler-style moustache.

The posters were captioned: 'Master Race? Wrong for People. Wrong for Dogs. Boycott Breeders. Adopt!'

Dogs at the world-famous event showed off a variety of unusual pet accessories

Dogs at the world-famous event showed off a variety of unusual pet accessories, including this colourful poncho

 

A Newfoundland wears a fun bib as it waits to go on show at Crufts

A Newfoundland wears a fun bib as it waits to go on show at Crufts

The group accused the Kennel Club, which runs Crufts, of promoting the breeding of dogs to achieve a 'pure bloodline' or 'master pedigree' at the cost of animals' health.

Spokeswoman Poorva Joshipura said: 'Whether you call it 'pedigree' or 'master race', the quest for pure bloodlines is the same thing - the false and dangerous belief that some breeds or races are superior to others.

'In the race to produce pure-bred dogs, breeders are moving unwittingly towards creating a Frankenstein's monster of a dog.

'The end result will be not only a more genetically impaired animal but also hundreds and hundreds more homeless animals put to death for the "crime" of being mutts.'

The demonstrations coincided with the publication of an open letter from the producer of a BBC documentary about health problems in pedigree dogs, accusing the Kennel Club of failing to take sufficient action on the issue.

The Kennel Club said it was 'committed to ensuring that every dog's life is as healthy and happy as it can be'.

Caroline Kisko, Communications Director, for the Kennel Club, added: 'We are very excited about this year's event, which will celebrate the unique relationship between dogs and their owners and the many ways that they mutually improve and touch each other's lives.'

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Posted: Mar 13, 2010 7:15am

 

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13
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\\nIn a meeting of the EU General Affairs Council nineteen states opposed the approval of  GM Maize Pioneer 1507, developed jointly by DuPont and Dow Chemica l, while five supported it and four abstained from any view, EU officials s...
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Please sign this petition asking shelters to open before temperatures hit life-threatening levels: http://www.thepetitionsit e.co
Feb
12
by Just C.
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 \\r\\n\\r\\n\\r\\nW hy this is important\\r\\nAs a community comprised of members actively using the tools provided by this site to accomplish needed improvements to various aspects of all life (animal, human, environmental), we, the undersigned, are her...
Feb
11
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\r\nHow to spread the news\r\n02/11/14\r\n\r\nT his is really awfull, i did write many hosst announcements, but they dissapeared, luckely
Jan
30
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Holidays 2013/2014
Jan
22
by Just C.
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\\n\\r\\n\\r\\n \\\"The only thing necessary for the triumph\\r\\n\\nof evil is for good men to do nothing.\\\" ~ Edmund Burke ~ \\n\\r\\n\\n
Jan
21
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\\n\\r\\n\\r\\n\\r\\nEuro pe’s depressed carbon markets are to be given an automatic ‘market reserve’ facility allowing at least 100 million carbon allowances – or 12% of the market – to be withheld or released to buoy prices, ac...