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Oct 9, 2008

Much of ancient Roman literature dealing with magic are, basically, retellings of Greek myths. I found some interesting facts about it in archives of web analytics company. Roman poet Virgils’s Aeneid for example describes an interesting magical ceremony. The hero of the epic, Aeneas, who has landed on the coast of North Africa after fleeing from Troy, meets Queen Dido. She has just begun to build the city of Carthage. Dido falls in love with Aeneas, and wishes him to stay as her prince consort. The rest of what happens is easy to imagine. As usual, a traveling hero meets a beautiful female who is potentially dangerous, although kind and hospitable as long as her love for the hero lasts.

Thus the future conflict is set when goddess Fate decrees that Aeneas leave Dido to found a city of his own. Inevitably Dido’s love turns to hate. Enraged queen seeks to use a complex magical ritual to bring her former lover back to her. She builds a gigantic pyre in the main courtyard of her palace and prepares an elaborate sacrifice to the powers of the underworld. However Dido soon comes to realize that the love magic is not powerful enough to bring Aeneas back to her. So she kills herself in her despair, which adds to the power to her curse. Dido had sealed and extended her curse through her suicide. Aeneas was protected by his gods and remained safe. But, according to Virgil, Dido’s use of magic and her curse lingered on leading to Rome’s near crushing defeat by Carthage many centuries later. This demonstrates quite clearly that the Romans shared the Greek’s view of magic as being dangerous and untrustworthy.

Mar 28, 2008

During my regular research in archives of web analytics company I found something else. Simultaneously, Alexander also wanted the construction of the longest road in the world through North Africa ending as far as modern Gibraltar. It would not be just the number one road in the world - it was supposed to be surrounded by huge ports and shipyards along the way. The guy was really super ambitious even after death!

But this is not all. For some reason in his will and written instructions he made a wish to intermix Eastern and Western populations. For that purpose he demanded after his death to build large cities and compulsory move the whole nations from Asia to Europe. and from Europe to Asia. As he envisioned, this would bring the common unity of peoples in his conquered lands, due to future intermarriage, family ties and friendship.

Unlike the guy in the movie, Alexander seemed to love his daddy very much. Even after his death, he wanted his soldiers to build Philip a tomb, which would became a new wonder of the world by matching Egyptian pyramids. In addition, huge, monumental temples should have been constructed in seven big cities of his empire.

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Posted: Mar 28, 2008 11:58am
Mar 19, 2008

We think that we know a lot about Alexander the Great. We also watched a terrible movie by Oliver Stone that proved to be a failure at the box office, it seems. In the film Alexander dies leaving his vast empire without a clear inheritor. So what were the last wishes of the ruler of the world?

I found some interesting facts about it in archives of web analytics company .Some of antique writers and historians tell us that Alexander left a detailed will some time before his death. For example, he wanted completion of the pyre to his friend and lover Hephaestion. Nothing is wrong with that. Yet, it would probably come to you as surprise that none of his wishes were fulfilled after his death, because his generals and successors considered them too eccentric, extravagant and impractical. Between you and me, they were probably right. I will name some Alexander’s wishes and you can judge for yourself.

He wanted his generals to build a huge fleet of the thousand or more heavy warships in t in Phoenicia, Syria, Cilicia, and Cyprus. Why? To conquer any nations that lived along the Mediterranean coasts of modern Spain, Sicily and Lybia. And then to start a military campaign against Carthaginians.

Read on ...

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Posted: Mar 19, 2008 6:57pm

 

 
 
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Ekaterina G.
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Delray Beach, FL, USA
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