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Apr 12, 2010

*Every 40 seconds someone in the world commits suicide. That's nearly 1,000,000 annually, 31,655 of those are in the United States.

*16 out of every 100,000 people worldwide died by suicide or 11 per 100,000 Americans.

*For every two victims of homicide in the U.S., there are three people who take their own life.

*Suicide attempts happen up to 20 times more often than successful suicides.

*Males are four times more likely to die by suicide than females, even though females attempt suicide three times more frequently than males.

*Suicide rates have increased by 60% worldwide in the last 45 years and rates among young people have been increasing so much as to make them the group at highest risk in 1/3 of all countries.

*Between 1952 and 1995, suicide among adolescents and young adults nearly tripled in the US.

*More American teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, pneumonia and influenza, and chronic lung disease combined.

*Of Americans, Caucasians are more likely to die by suicide than any other racial backgrounds.

*In some countries, one being the United States, suicide is among the three leading causes of death of those between the ages of 15-44 years, and the second leading cause of death in those aged 10-24 years.

  If you think someone you know is considering suicide talk to them about seeking help. Never treat a suicidal remark as a joke. If you have had any suicidal thoughts or feelings tell your doctor as soon as possible, they will know how to get you the help you need.

Here are a few POSSIBLE suicide warning signs: (remember as many as 25% of all those who die by suicide show NO warning signs)

     

  • Appearing depressed or sad most of the time
    (Untreated depression is the number one cause for suicide)
  • Talking or writing about death or suicide
  • Withdrawing from family and friends
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Feeling helpless
  • Feeling strong anger or rage
  • Feeling trapped -- like there is no way out of a situation
  • Experiencing dramatic mood changes
  • Abusing drugs or alcohol
  • Exhibiting a change in personality
  • Acting impulsively
  • Losing interest in most activities
  • Experiencing a change in sleeping habits
  • Experiencing a change in eating habits
  • Losing interest in most activities
  • Performing poorly at work or in school
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Writing a will
  • Feeling excessive guilt or shame
  • Acting recklessly

Suicide Helpline Info
:

*911

*1-800-SUICIDE
(1-800-784-2433)

*
1-800-273-TALK
(1-800-273-8255)

*Text Telephone:
1-800-799-4TTY
(1-800-799-4889)

*Military Veterans
Suicide Hotline:
1-800-273-TALK
(Press 1)

*Suicide Hotline
in Spanish:
1-800-273-TALK
(Press 2)

*
LGBT Youth
Suicide Hotline:
1-866-4-U-TREVOR
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Posted: Apr 12, 2010 3:07pm
Apr 5, 2010
Focus: Health
Action Request: Volunteer
Location: United States



To Write Love On Her Arms is a non profit organization that offers love & hope to people suffering from depression, self injury, suicide, addiction and related issues. Join the street team to help the TWLOHA movement.


 
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Posted: Apr 5, 2010 8:12pm
Mar 24, 2010

*this is a list from wikipedia of famous people who have depression. It helps me realize that I don't have to let my depression keep me from reaching my goals in life*

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Posted: Mar 24, 2010 2:06am
Mar 24, 2010

*this is an article from abcnews intitled "what parents need to know about teen suicide" by Beth J. Harpaz*

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year-olds, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the phenomenon has lately been in the news. Cornell University is coping with a suicide cluster among students, two teenage girls killed themselves last month in Norwood, Pa., and four teens died by suicide last year in Palo Alto, Calif. Teen suicide rates in the U.S. have decreased since the 1970s, but a 2007 CDC survey still found 14 percent of high school students had "seriously considered suicide" in the previous 12 months. 

These include feelings of hopelessness, anger, excessive worry or anxiety or other signs of depression; self-destructive or risky behavior, including excessive drug or alcohol abuse; extreme changes in moods, attitudes or behavior, or a withdrawal from activities or socializing; and verbal or written threats, innuendos or statements like "Life isn't worth living." In some cases there may be a family history of suicide. Death by gunshot is the leading method of youth suicide.

Another factor often present in suicides is a "triggering event," such as a disappointment that leads to despondency. The event might not seem like a big deal to adults, but remember that teenagers don't always have the skills to cope with stress related to school pressures, social situations or family conflicts. Or they may be struggling with a serious problem such as the loss of a loved one.

These "triggering events can push someone off the edge," said Maureen Underwood, a social worker who has written suicide prevention school curricula and who works with the Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide.

The phenomenon of multiple suicides in one community or school raises a terrifying question for parents: Is adolescent suicide contagious?

"There is a contagion factor with kids," said Scott Fritz president and co-founder of the Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide. "It isn't any different than how they wear their hair or their clothes. They tend to copy each other."

"There is something about peer identification in that age group," agreed Underwood.

That doesn't mean parents should avoid raising the subject. There's no evidence that discussing suicide with kids in a responsible way leads them to do it. In fact, says Fritz, talking to teenagers about suicide helps prevent it.

But what exactly do you say?

Fritz says if there's been a suicide in your community or it's in the news, you might start like this: "'I just read in the paper that so-and-so died by suicide. What do you think about that?' ... Have you ever thought about suicide or what it means?'"

Just be careful not to glamorize or romanticize suicide; don't dilute the message that suicide is wrong. If your child knows of someone who committed suicide, you might say, "Johnny made a terrible mistake, and he can't take it back," Fritz said.

Many schools discourage tributes or other physical memorials in cases of suicide, and Fritz's organization asks that schools and parents refrain from dedicating events or places named for the deceased. The society also says there is evidence that publicizing the details of how suicides are carried out can encourage copycat behavior.

Fritz believes his daughter's suicide was triggered by antidepressant medication, and he testified at federal hearings that led to warning labels about suicidal behavior as a risk of certain drugs. So he also urges parents whose kids are taking medication to educate themselves about "what the side effects are and what to look for," he said.

But he noted that every suicide is unique, and multiple factors are usually involved, even if they may not be obvious beforehand.

"There is no typical profile," added Underwood. "There's never just one reason; there's always a more complicated story."

For parents, though, the message is simple: Talking about suicide with a teenager is not all that different from talking about drugs or sexual activity. Listen to what your child has to say and communicate your values.

The takeaway, Fritz said, should always be: "We value life, and no matter what problems you may have, there's nothing so bad that we can't work it through together."

 "Not My Kid" http://www.sptsnj.org/ An intense but extremely informative 17-minute video on its Web site that can help parents identify warning signs of suicidal behavior.
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Posted: Mar 24, 2010 12:55am
Mar 18, 2010

I have had PTSD for as long as I can remember, but I didn't know I had it until after high school when I finally decided to stick to my therapy meetings for my depression. I actually suffer from reoccurring major depression, PTSD, OCD, Torette's Syndrome, & general panic disorder due to abuse as a child. Saying that it effects my everyday life would be the understatement of the century. I can not drive for fear of having a panic attack, I have sever insomnia, I have an obvious "tick", I feel extreme paranoia around strangers, I have nightmares and have been told several times that I scream & cry in my sleep, I have random outburst of anger, I can't stand physical contact from anyone outside of my immediate family, I often overreact to sounds, I'm extremely impulsive, I stay tired & weak. It amazes me how little compassion people have for people like me. I developed a facial & neck "tick" when I was in middle school and I was constantly bullied. My teachers did nothing about it. They thought that I was just acting out to get attention. No one wants to be stared at like some kind of freak. No one wants people to be afraid of them because they are different. In high school my teachers were convinced that I was on drugs because my hands shook and my eyes were bloodshot and droopy. I got very depressed and I tried to commit suicide. There was a hook in my closet that could hold me (I only weighed 115 lb) and I found a thick cord and made a noose. I actually hung myself. I couldn't breath, my eyes felt like they were popping out of my head, and it was VERY painful. By some miracle I reached a box with my toe and knocked it over. I stood on it until I could untie the cord. I had the bruises around my neck for a while. After that I was put on Doxepin. It made me feel like I was in a dream all the time. I blacked out often and other times it felt like my body was acting on it's own. I remember walking around my school during class; I was confused and I had no sense of time. Once I waited for the bus in the clothes that I slept in. I hadn't even put on shoes or combed my hair. I had mud in between my toes. The bus driver told me that I should go back to bed, so I did. I just crawled under the covers with mud all over me. I quit taking the pills when I poured pesticide into a Dr Pepper can and drank it. I was lucky not to have had my stomach pumped. I started smoking pot and it seemed to help, but it is illegal and some of the people close to me gave me a hard time about it so I stopped. Now, I'm not taking nothing or even seeing my psychologist (because my co-pays are too expensive). I'm just trying to cope the best that I can.

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Posted: Mar 18, 2010 4:08pm
Feb 18, 2010

Did you know that 40% of water used during the summer is used outdoors? That is where having a rainwater harvesting system comes in handy. It sounds complicated but in reality it can be as simple as a bucket under a drain spout. The best systems are sealed air tight so that mosquitoes can't use the standing water as a breeding ground. You can make a simple system by attaching a spigot near the bottom of a large garbage can or barrel (facing down), then cutting a hole in the lid and fixing it onto the gutter on your house that receives the most rain fall. Use duct tape to seal the openings around the gutter. It is important that you don't let the bin over fill. If you want something a little sophisticated there are diverters and pre-made systems available that do the work for you. One of my favorites is the Garden Watersaver Diverter at gardenwatersaver.com.

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Posted: Feb 18, 2010 11:43pm
Feb 18, 2010

If you haven't already made the switch from chemical fertilizers to compost, now is the time. Soon it will be time to plant new seeds and you'll want to have your plant food ready. If you have a small garden a simple homemade kitchen compost should be enough, but if your planning a veggie garden then you'll want to make a large outside bin. *To make your own kitchen bin simply drill lots of air holes into a large bucket or container with a tight fitting lid. Add a layer of loose soil (any old dirt will do), a layer of dry leaves, left over fruit and veggie peels, used coffee grounds, and earthworms. Add water, make sure the lid is on tight, and roll it around to mix. It should be ready to use in about two weeks. *For large outside bins use a large garbage bin. After you make the air holes, cut a square hole in the top side of the bin so that when you turn it upside down it looks like a doggy door. This will be where you access the compost so it must be big enough for a shovel. Next, cut the bottom out. Place, it bottom up, where you intend to keep it (I would suggest somewhere hidden from view) and fill it with the layers mentioned above. Mix it with a pitch fork as you fill it. It might take longer than two weeks depending on how full the bin is.

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Posted: Feb 18, 2010 11:30pm

 

 
 
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