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Aug 24, 2007

James,

Will I be able to eat raw to get enough vitamins and minerals for my body if I am allergic to raw apples, peaches, plums, cherries, berries, black grapes, star fruit, kiwi, pomegranate, soy, rye, certain nuts, etc., etc.???

I just don't have many foods that I am able to eat raw. If processed for some reason in one way or another I can eat some of the above, but this is hard and I seem to lose foods more and more as time goes on.

Can anyone there help direct me to someone who can answer these questions? I am 50 years old and fasting a lot, too, in hopes of ridding my body of toxins.

What to do? Thanks.

CF
----------------------------------

[Dr. Flora's responses are in italics]

Will I be able to eat raw to get enough vitamins and minerals for my body if I am allergic to raw apples, peaches, plums, cherries, berries, black grapes, star fruit, kiwi, pomegranate, soy, rye, certain nuts, etc., etc.???

Who tested you and found that you are allergic to those? What kinds of symptoms do you have when you eat them? What kind of nuts, and are they soaked before you have tried to eat them? Were the grapes, peaches, apples, etc. organic? Are you familiar with food-blood type issues?

I can't eat any of the most polluted with pesticides and insecticides foods, because of the reaction to the sprays or even the solvents that they spray on the rollers that bring the fruits and vegetables to the boxes. I reacted violently the other day to something that was rolled to packaging and had to investigate and found that the rollers on the machine had been sprayed with teflon. Petroleum biproducts are the worst stuff. Kills canaries and kills us! And yet, they still sell teflon pans and teflon coated ironing boards and irons.

I just don't have many foods that I am able to eat raw.

I would quote from someone else that 80% of raw foods will give people trouble with 'allergic reactions' if they are not prepared properly. For me to try to eat cabbage, carrots or beets without autolyzing them first by making them into sauerkraut/veggikraut, I will get bloated/distended abdomen/have pain/gas/reflux, etc. If I eat Ranier cherries that are not organic, I will have terrible pains in my body. Star fruit and kiwi are too acid for me, and rye has a certain mold that is very dangerous.

All these reasons are why Dr. Wigmore stuck with the foods that were non-reactive, non-allergenic, like most greens (not spinach, watercress), and watermelon and apples, papaya and most organic fruits, non-citrus.

Once you have a peaceful inside, with just half a dozen items in a blended form, figs, almonds, flax seeds soaked, greens, sesame/sunflower seed cheese, dulse, kelp, mangos, papaya, home-ripened pineapple juice, you will then be able to add one new food (usually one of your favorites that you reacted to earlier), and using something called the Coco pulse test, see if your heart pulse rate increases by 15-18 beats per minute and if it does, this is not a good food for you.

If processed for some reason in one way or another I can eat some of the above, but this is hard and I seem to lose foods more and more as time goes on.

My bottom line is energy, that's why I eat Energy Soup and that is why a lot of people do. I don't require much variety and make it the same way most all of the time, with just a few various greens, and watermelon or apples (I prefer Gala).

Have you read any of Dr. Sherri Rogers' books on allergies? It sounds as if you are so toxic that you are approaching what she calls universal allergic reactions.

Can anyone there help direct me to someone who can answer these questions? I am 50 years old and fasting a lot too in hopes of ridding my body of toxins.

At your age, I wouldn't suggest fasting with water. If you do a blender drink 'fast' you will not only eliminate the toxins, but keep your strength up and rebuild nerves, etc.

I of course recommend a vegan diet to keep your body from having to deal with inflammatory foods/chemicals/enzymes, and also for the time being, avoid totally the nightshades and check back with us in 3 or 4 weeks. You should feel great.

Peace and Love,
Flora

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Posted: Aug 24, 2007 11:51am
Nov 16, 2006
The Social Aspects of Eating a Raw Food Diet.
by Paul Nison
www.rawlife.com

I have been eating a raw food diet for more than 12 years now, and teaching about making the transition to a raw food diet for about 7 years now. As I travel across the world, one of the questions I get most often is: “How does someone consume a raw food diet, while not being considered an outcast by society?” I thought when I first started eating this way many years ago, that this was going to be an issue for me as well. But to my pleasant surprise, I have found it to be very easy.

Like any change, at first it can be a challenge, especially when most of the world doesn’t understand the reason for the change or anything about it. The raw diet is different than any other way of eating. It is becoming the new “in thing” so it is not as challenging to be accepted by many people today as it was just a few years ago. However, when ever anyone makes a change in their daily diet, not only is it weird or different to the person making the change, but the response from friends and family can be difficult to deal with. In this article I want to give suggestions on how to be accepted by your friends, family and the world after making the decision to start eating a raw food diet.

It is good to know that years ago, consuming a vegetarian diet was considered weird or different. But today it is pretty much accepted all over the world. Today, the raw food diet is becoming accepted and there are more and more raw food, vegetarian restaurants opening all over the world, many in the United States.

First, if you plan to consume anything less than a 100% raw food diet (which is fine), you won’t run into the challenges as someone who wants to go 100% raw. You can just simply have cooked food on those occasions when you can’t get raw. If doing so, do your best to make sure the food is as healthy as possible.

Now, if you plan to go 100% raw, not to worry. Just like making the change from an animal eater to a vegetarian or vegan, how we handle the situation can make all the difference.

If someone tells you that you are sick, you might  say to them, “How do you know how I feel?” But if 100 people come to you in one day and tell you that you are sick, you might start to think, am I? When first starting to eat a raw food diet, many people are going to tell you things like, “You are crazy; That’s dangerous; You need cooked food, or You can’t do that.” The more you hear it, the more you might believe it.

As long as you thought through the reason and purpose for going on an all raw diet, you should not be bothered too much by what others say. But if you are in doubt before they say anything, their words might take you over the edge.

Rule #1
Don’t go beyond your understanding. Do the research before changing your diet so when you get these comments, you will know you are doing the right thing.

Rule #2
Make the choice yourself and not because someone else talked you into it. As long as it is your choice to change, that will help keep you strong. But if you try to change for someone else, it will make it harder to stick with it when the pressure is on.

Even if you have the knowledge and you made the choice yourself, their words still might make you second guess your choice to go on an all raw diet. We are human and we have feelings and emotions. It’s like if you get a new haircut and think it looks great. You could be pretty confident in that feeling. But the more people tell you, your hair looked better before you cut it, or something like that. you will start to think, maybe you made a mistake. It goes the same way with the raw food diet.

The most important rule we have to learn is we cannot let our feelings override our decision. I call this decision over emotion. It is hard to be consistent if we are living off of “how we feel.” Just a few days on a raw diet, many of us will feel the need for cooked food. Also many of us will base our feelings on what other people tell us. This is why once we make a decision, we should learn to stick to it. Make a promise to yourself that your faith is so strong in what you are doing that you are going to stick with it, and no one is going to talk you out of it.

Once you feel confident in what you are doing, how do you deal with friends, family and others who think you have went off the wall.

*Do not get over zealous. It’s easy to believe so strong in the message that you just want to push it on everyone else. You and I  most likely know, that the raw food diet is the healthiest way to eat our food, but it took us a while to learn this, and it might take other people a while. Accept all people where they are.

*Live by example. Let people see how great you feel and look. And how much energy you have. Then they will start to ask questions. That will open the door for you to give them the answers.

*Pray for them. I can tell you first hand, you cannot change anyone, but by prayer, you can help everyone. The strongest thing you can do for the people you love is not create separation in your differences, but pray that they will come to see and understand the message about the healing foods and why the sooner they start eating a raw diet, the better their health will be. There is a great saying I once heard that says, “Do your best and leave the rest up to God.” Well I can change that a little and say, “Pray for them, and leave the rest up to God.”

*How do you eat when you travel? This is a question I get most often. I have never had an issue with these because I can get fruits and vegetables everywhere.

The most amazing advice you will ever get on how to socially fit into society on a raw food diet. Three magic words, will make this path so much easier for you. No matter who it is, or where you are, these three words will work for you. Do not tell people you are eating a raw diet because….. Most people do not care about health or understand it, and they will think you are crazy. Here are the three magic words: “My doctor said…” If you tell them that, then they can accept it with no problem. (You really don’t have to try to find a doctor to say that. Most doctor’s will never say a raw diet is best, but just saying that will help them accept you.

Understand, most people do not eat for health. They eat for taste. If you are making food for your family, don’t put the food on the table and give them a health lesson. Just make the food taste great, and they will enjoy it, and you will enjoy most people accepting the way you eat.

If anyone tells you how to eat, just tell them nicely, “If you do not want me to tell you how to eat, please don’t judge my eating habits.” That should keep them quiet. If not, just shove a carrot in their mouth.

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Posted: Nov 16, 2006 7:44am
Nov 8, 2006
Focus: Health
Action Request: Various
Location: United States

Study Links Hair to Eating Disorders

http://www.organicconsumers.org/2006/article_3151.cfm

SALT LAKE CITY Oct 16, 2006 (AP)— Hair strands reveal evidence of a person's diet and can help doctors diagnose eating disorders, researchers at Brigham Young University reported.

Researchers found differences in nitrogen and carbon when samples from females at an eating-disorder clinic were compared with hair from females who didn't have a problem. They said they were able to accurately determine the source 80 percent of the time.

The lead author, Kent Hatch, said hair acts like a "tape recorder."

Just as it can be used to determine if someone has used drugs or has been exposed to harmful amounts of mercury and lead, hair can show what someone has been eating, Hatch said.

Larger studies are planned to possibly develop a test that can be used in clinics. The research was published Monday in a journal, Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

"This would give a clinician an objective measure to use to diagnose an eating disorder, and we hope it will eventually allow a sound diagnosis at an earlier stage," said Hatch, a professor in BYU's department of integrative biology.

A test is needed in the diagnosis of eating disorders because those who suffer from them tend to be secretive about their problem or may not even know they are ill.

"Their self-evaluation is very impaired," said Jennifer Tolman, clinical director at Avalon Hills, a treatment facility in Cache County, Utah.

"We had a girl who was 5-10 and 98 pounds and she wasn't even sure she had an eating disorder, although she could recognize it in others," Tolman said.

Doctors and therapists often must rely upon patients to report what and how much they eat, information that can be unreliable.

"They are poor historians by nature," Tolman said.

She had not seen the BYU study and declined to comment on the findings. Tolman said damage from eating disorders heart problems, elevated liver enzymes, drops in bone density can be irreversible and sometimes life threatening.

The BYU research was conducted by faculty in integrative biology, communications, statistics and geology.

A co-author, Steven Thomsen, said the project grew from earlier research on the link between eating disorders and exposure to fashion, fitness and beauty magazines. He told his colleagues it would be helpful to biologically determine the same results.

"We have talked about going back and re-exploring some of the things we've studied and adding this variable," Thomsen said of the hair test.

 

On the Net:

Brigham Young University, http://www.byu.edu

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Posted: Nov 8, 2006 9:17am
Dec 10, 2005
Healthy eating, sea to sky
NUTRISPEAK by Vesanto Melina MS, RD
http://www.commonground.ca/iss/0512173/cg173_vesanto.shtml

For many of us, winter heralds the pleasure of travel. For some, it is the best season to visit exotic locations and escape from the cold and rain. For others, it’s an opportunity to reconnect with distant family members. Work-related projects recently took me to California and Barcelona, Spain, and this month’s column was inspired by KLM’s strict vegetarian meal, served on my return flight via Amsterdam.
My dinner consisted of roasted eggplant in a delicious sauce, couscous with currants and coriander, a diced beet salad with endive, and fresh fruit slices (pineapple, grapefruit, and kiwi) with a fruit sauce for dessert. Not bad for an airline.
Whether you are a vegetarian, vegan, or raw food enthusiast, or you have food sensitivities, or you simply want to enjoy healthy meals during your travels, a little pre-planning will help you meet your food requirements, wherever you go. Here are some pointers:
1. Specify food preferences in advance
Pack your own healthy lunch for short flights; on longer flights, most airlines offer a meal service that caters to special needs. You can request several types of vegetarian diets and order an appropriate meal for your food sensitivities. Whether you are travelling by train, plane, or cruise ship, discuss food restrictions when you book your journey. You will often be pleasantly surprised at how well these companies take care of you.
2. Research the internet
Conduct some internet research to find food establishments along your travel route and at your destination. Vegetarian restaurants typically serve meals that are free of fish, dairy, eggs, animal products, and gluten-free grains. These establishments can accommodate a wide variety of health conditions, including diabetes, heart conditions, and other chronic diseases. Visit www.vegdining.com, www.happycow.com, and www.ivu.org, and also check out some sites related to food allergies.
Before you arrive you may wish to contact restaurants , via phone or email, to explain your limitations and to ask whether they are equipped to accommodate your needs.
3. Check out the food guides
The Vegetarian Journal’s Guide to Natural Food Restaurants in the U.S. and Canada is handy during road trips (www.vrg.org). For information about vegetarian restaurants in Europe, visit www.vegetarianguides.co.uk. Our books, Becoming Vegetarian, Becoming Vegan, and Raising Vegetarian Children all include travel sections, as does the Food Allergy Survival Guide. (Available at Banyen, Chapters, and Amazon.com.)
4. Pack some containers
It can be immensely helpful to purchase a few spill-proof containers in suitable sizes for a serving of vegetable or bean salad, hummus, salad dressing, nut butters, or a non-dairy beverage to round out the foods available enroute. You may want to bring a plastic fork and spoon. (To my amusement, in the wake of increased airline security since 9/11, I once had my small, plastic fork confiscated before boarding a Hawaiian airliner, after which the airline supplied me with an identical plastic fork for its in-flight snack.)
Certain foods pack well for travel. Combine your favourite nuts and dried fruits to create a nourishing, and even exotic, trail mix. Bring small packages of non-dairy milk, although cereals, granola, and muesli also taste good with fruit juice. You’ll find delicious, fresh juices in airports throughout Europe and even in the departures area of our own Vancouver airport. For a protein boost, reconstitute individual portions of instant soup mix (black bean, lentil, or curry) with hot water. Mix ready-to-eat tofu with a little seasoning and chopped, raw veggies to make a dip or sandwich filling. When food foraging is challenging, add a multivitamin mineral supplement.
5. Plan your exercise program
Fitness profoundly affects how we feel, so it’s wise to include it in your plans. When I travel as a speaker or am visiting, I advise my hosts that I prefer to include an hour of exercise every day; I inquire about the proximity of beautiful parks, swimming pools, and recreational facilities. Fitness becomes a rich and integral part of our itinerary. In Barcelona, in addition to visiting a Gaudi park, we toured an interactive playground with an immense xylophone that allowed children and adults to leap from note to note, teeter-totters that triggered fountain sprays, and unique merry-go-rounds.
Travel in good health and bon voyage.
Vesanto Melina is a BC-based registered dietitian and author of a number of best-selling books about food and nutrition. For personal consultations, call 604-888-8325 (Fort Integrated Health Clinic) or 604-882-6782 (home office, near Fort Langley). www.nutrispeak.com
For issues related to factory farming, see the University of Toronto’s Coalition of Animal Rights and the Environment (CARE) website: http://utcare.sa.utoronto.ca/meat1.htm
For facts about free-range poultry, see www.cok.net/lit/freerange.php
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Posted: Dec 10, 2005 10:42am

 

 
 
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