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Jun 24, 2008
dear friends,

i decided to publish my first writings. The book is called fruitistica & is made of images & words.
It is an e-book, for i don't want trees to be cut to be able to publish my images & words. Organic & fair trade cotton paper would be the solution, yet it is still hard to find, especially to publish a book.
This book is about
the cruelty toward humans, non humans, plants & the earth.
The site i chose to host it seems ok & many unknown writers are hosted there. Hopefully, i won't remain unknown for too long
i hope you find some interest in it.
You can find it here.

Thank you for reading me.

be well & in peace.
pelagus
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Posted: Jun 24, 2008 3:56am
Mar 18, 2008

How to select and store fruits

How to Select and Store Fruits

Apples

Selection

Apples should be firm to hard. They should also be well coloured, the skins should be tight, unbroken, and unblemished, although brown freckles or streaks are characteristic of some varieties.

Storage

Cold temperatures keep apples from ripening further after they are picked. If left at room temperature the process is speeded. If an apple is freshly picked or has been in months of cold storage, it must be kept cold or its flesh will degenerate into mushiness.

Apples can be stored in the refrigerator crisper in plastic bags. If bought in a good condition they can be kept in the refrigerator for six weeks. They should be checked often to remove any rotten apple that can spoil the rest of them.

Apricots

Selection

Apricots when mature are soft to the touch and juicy. They must be eaten as soon as possible because they spoil very easily. Apricots that still need to ripen will do so at room temperature they should be firm, plump and have an orange-gold colour. Hard fruits tingled with green will hardly ever ripe fully.

Even when not fully ripe, apricots should yield to gentle pressure and release a perfumed fragrance; their skin should be smooth and velvety. Shrivelled skin or bruisers should be avoided, although small blemishes will not change its flavour.

Storage

If apricots are not fully ripe they can be kept in a plastic bag at room temperature, away from heat or direct sunlight, for two to three days. If they are ripe, they may be stored in a plastic bag, kept in the refrigerator for a day or to at most. Apricots must not be washed until ready to eat.

Avocados

Selection

Normally avocados are available at the markets hard and unripe so they must soften at room temperature for a few days.

A good avocado is heavy, unblemished and has an unbroken skin. It should yield to gentle pressure. If fingers stay marked it means it is overripe.

Most avocado varieties stay green even when ripe others turn purple or black.

Storage

Ripe avocados will keep in the refrigerator for four to five days, but longer storage at cold temperatures will cause discoloration of the flesh and unpleasant changes in the flavour. Unripe avocados should not be kept in the refrigerator, as they will never ripen properly. Unripe fruits will soften at room temperature in three to six days; to achieve quicker ripening they can be placed in a loosely closed paper bag with a tomato.

Bananas

Selection

Bananas should be plump, firm, and bright coloured. They must be unblemished. Occasional brown spots on the skin are normal, but sunken, moist looking dark areas indicate bruises on the fruit. Their stem ends and skins must be intact: if they are split contamination may occur. Bananas bruise easily so they must be handled with care.

Storage
Bananas should be left at room temperature, but away from heat or direct sun for further ripening. They can also be stored in a plastic bag with an apple. To slow down the ripening process they can be kept in the refrigerator. The skin will turn dark but the fruit inside will remain edible. Refrigerated bananas can be kept for two weeks. Unripe bananas should never be refrigerated as their exposure to cold interrupts their ripening cycle, and even if returned to room temperature will they carry on the process.
Berries
Selection
For the best flavour, berries should be bought in season. All berries must be plump, dry, firm, well shaped and uniformly coloured. They should not have caps or stems, except for strawberries. The caps on strawberries should have a fresh and green look and the fruit bright red. Blueberries should be navy blue with a silver white bloom on their surface. Blackberries should be purple to black and must not have any white patches. Cranberries must be red and firm.

Storage
Berries are one of the most perishable fruits; they can become soft, and mushy in 24 hours. When berries are bought in boxes they must be checked as soon as possible in order to separate overripe berries for immediate consumption. The rest are better if spread on a plate or pan covered with paper towels and then wrapped with plastic. They can be kept for usually no longer than two days but storage time varies according to type.

Fresh blueberries can be kept for ten days; cranberries will manage for two weeks, while raspberries should be used within a day.

Freezing berries is a way of having this fruit all year round. Fresh cranberries can be frozen, unwashed, in freezing bags for a year. Raspberries and blackberries can be washed and drained well, spread on a recipient and freeze until solid, then transferred to a heavy plastic bag. They can be kept for ten months or a year. The same procedure for blueberries can be followed but they must not be washed before freezing.

Cherries

Selection

Gould cherries are large, glossy, plump and hard. Bruises or cuts must be carefully checked. When there are spoiled cherries in a bin they quickly start others to decay. So they must be checked carefully.

The stems should be fresh and green; cherries without stem should be avoided as they may begin to decay when the skin breaks. Darkened stems are a sign of either old age or poor storage conditions.

Storage
They should be loosely packed in order to avoid bruising. They should not be washed until serving time. They can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week, but must be checked to remove any that are bad.

Cherries can also be frozen the same way as raspberries and blackberries.

Dates

Selection
Dates are sold fresh or dried. The difference between the two is not easy to see as they have a similar aspect in both forms.

Both types are usually packed in cellophane plastic containers. The dates that are commonly available in stores are fresh or partially dried, and do not contain any preservatives.

Both fresh and dried dates should be smooth skinned, glossy and plump; they should not be broken, cracked, and dry they are slightly wrinkled. Those that smell sour or have crystallized sugar should be avoided.

Dried dates should not be rock hard.

Storage
They can be stored in the refrigerator in airtight plastic bags to avoid odours from other foods, which they absorb easily. They will hang on for eight months. Even at room temperature they can hang on for some months. Dried dates can stay in the refrigerator for up to a year.

Figs

Selection
Good figs should be plump, unbruised, have unbroken skin and a mild fragrance.

Sour smelling figs indicate spoilage. They should be just soft to the touch, but not mushy.

Dried figs give in when slightly squeezed. Moldy or sour smelling dried figs must be avoided.

Storage
To ripen slightly under ripe figs, place them on a plate at room temperature, away from sunlight and turn them frequently. Ripe fresh figs should be kept in the refrigerator. As they bruise easily it is better to put them in a shallow plate, covered with a plastic wrap. They can be stored for no longer than two days.

Dried figs can be stored at cool room temperature or in the refrigerator; they must be well wrapped after opening so that they don’t become too dry and hard. They can be kept for several months. They can also be frozen, and then thawed at room temperature.

Grapefruit

Selection

Grapefruit is only picked when fully ripe. The fruit should be round, smooth and heavy for their size.

Glossy fruits with slightly flattened ends are preferable.

Storage
Grapefruits can be left at room temperature for a week and they are juiciest when slightly warm rather than chilled. To keep them longer, they should be refrigerated in the crisper; here they can be kept for six to eight weeks. It is better to leave them at room temperature for a while before juicing or eating them.

Grapes

Selection
Grapes are thin- skinned and easily damaged, so they should be displayed in no more than two bunches deep and under refrigeration. They can be found wrapped in tissue paper, enclosed in perforated plastic bags or loose.

Normally grapes are picked ripe and once they are picked they will not ripen further.

Wrinkled, sticky or discoloured grapes should be avoided.

Storage
Grapes can be stored unwashed in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for a week. Damaged fruit must be removed in order to avoid further spoilage.

Kiwi fruit

Selection
The best kiwis are plump, fragrant and they yield to gentle pressure. Unripe fruit has a hard core and a tart astringent taste.

Kiwis that are mushy with bruisers, or wet spots are not good.

Storage
To ripen firm kiwis, place them in room temperature, but away from heat or direct sunlight for a few days. To accelerate the process they can be placed in a paper bag with an apple, pear or banana. If the fruit is ripe do not place with other fruits for it perishes quickly even if in the refrigerator. Ripe should hang on for one to two weeks.

Lemons and limes

Selection

These fruits should be firm, glossy and bright. Lemons should be bright yellow, not greenish, and limes dark green. Limes turn from green to yellow when they ripen, but the immature fruit has the best taste.

Lemons can be stored at room temperature for two weeks without refrigeration. Limes however, should be refrigerated immediately for they are more perishable.

Both can be stored in plastic bags in the refrigerator crisper and kept up to six weeks.

Mangoes

Selection
A ripe mango will yield to slight pressure when held between hands. The skin can either be yellow-orange or red, which will spread in area as the fruit ripens. Has there are several varieties and some do not change colours they can be checked for fragrance and softness.

A completely greenish grey skin mango will not ripen properly.

A perfect ripe mango will have an intense fragrance. Black speckles on the skin are normal in this fruit, but if there are many it may be a signal of flesh spoilage. A loose skin also indicates that the fruit is not good.

Storage
Under ripe mangoes can be left at room temperature for a few days to soften and sweeten. To speed ripening they may be put into a plastic bag. Ripe fruits can be kept in the refrigerator in plastic bags for a few days.

Melons

Selection

Melons do not ripen further once they are picked. This fruit is shaped symmetrically round, oval or oblong. It should be free of cracks, soft spots, or dark bruises. Ripe melons are firm, but a slight softness is a good sign.

In some melons a full fragrance is a clue to it’s maturity, but if they have been chilled the fragrance will not be noticed. Others don’t have any fragrance even when ripe.

Storage
To improve the eating quality of melons they can be left at room temperature for two to four days. This will turn the fruit softer and juicier but not sweeter as they do not ripen any more once picked.

If during this time the fruit does not reach its ripeness peak it’s because it was picked unripe and is not worth eating.

Once ripe or cut, melons should be refrigerated and used within about two days.

They should be enclosed in plastic bags to protect other products in the refrigerator from the ethylene gas that the melons free.

An uncut watermelon can be stored at room temperature if necessary. But in very hot temperatures it is advisable to refrigerate it. It takes 8 to 12 hours to chill a whole watermelon thoroughly. Cut watermelon must be tightly wrapped in plastic and refrigerated for no more than four days.

Nectarines

Selection

Ripe nectarines should yield to gentle pressure and have a sweet fragrance. Brightly coloured fruits that are firm or moderately hard will ripen in two or three days at room temperature.

Nectarines that are hard or greenish indicate that they were picked too soon and will not ripen fully.

Shrivelled skins or mushy fruit can indicate signs of decay.

Storage
Hard nectarines can ripen at room temperature for two or three days in a loosely closed paper bag, away from sunlight. Once the fruit gives slightly to gentle pressure, it’s ready to eat.

They can be kept in the refrigerator crisper for another three to five days.

Oranges

Selection

Oranges are always picked ripe.

Oranges should be firm, and heavy for their size and evenly shaped. Choose oranges that have a smooth skin rather than deeply pitted.

Storage
Oranges can be kept in the refrigerator but they can also be stored at room temperature. They do not need any wrapping for their skin protects them.

Papayas

Selection

Papayas turn from green to yellow-orange as they ripen, so you should choose fruits that are at least half yellow; the colour change begins at the bottom and moves along the stem end. Papayas that are completely green with no signs of yellow have been picked to soon and many never ripen properly.

Fully ripe papayas are three – quarters to totally yellow or yellow orange; they will give slightly when pressed gently, but should not be soft and mushy at the stem end.

The skin should be smooth and unbruised. Cut papayas should smell fragrant and sweet.

Storage
A half ripe papaya will ripen in two to four days if left at room temperature; to ripen faster it can be stored in a paper bag with a banana. After ripe they can be refrigerated in a plastic bag for a week, but they loose their delicate flavour in time, so they should be used in a day or two if possible.

Passion fruit

Selection

Choose large and heavy fruit with wrinkled skin.

Storage

If the skin is not deeply wrinkled, keep the fruit at room temperature until it is; Ripe passion fruit can be refrigerated for a few days

Peaches

Selection

Peaches do not get any sweeter after they have been harvested, though they will become softer and juicier.

Rock- hard fruit should be avoided, choose those that yield slightly to pressure. Choose fruits that are mildly fragrant.

Spots on the skin are early signs of decay.

Storage
Firm peaches can be left at room temperature for a few days to soften. They can be placed in a paper bag to speed the process. Store ripe peaches in the refrigerator crisper if you are not going to eat them within a day. They should keep up to five days.

Pears

Selection
In general, pears should look relatively unblemished and well coloured, in some varieties full colour will not develop until the fruit ripens.

Pears are always picked unripe they are usually hard and need to ripen further.

Ripe pears will give in to gentle pressure. Fruit with dark spots should be avoided.

Storage

Pears can be put to ripe at room temperature first, then refrigerated for no longer than a day or to before eating them. Cold will slow down the ripening process but will not stop it.

To speed ripening, the pears can be placed in a paper or perforated plastic bag and turned occasionally. Never store pears either in or out of the refrigerator in sealed plastic bags, the lack of oxygen will cause the fruit to spoil. Check the fruit often and refrigerate them or eat them as soon as they yield to gentle pressure.

Persimmons

Selection
Look for deeply coloured fruits, which should be reddish rather than yellowish. Choose persimmons that are glossy, well rounded, and free of cracks or bruises, with their leaf like sepals still green and firmly attached.

Storage
You can leave persimmons at room temperature in a paper bag along with an apple for quick ripening.

Ripe persimmons should be placed in a plastic bag, stored in the refrigerator, and used as soon as possible.

Pineapples

Selection

Pineapples do not ripe at home, so it is important to choose one in prime condition. Most of the traditional “secrets” in selecting this fruit are, in fact unreliable.

The fruit should be firm and plump, as well as heavy for its size, with fresh looking green leaves. Bruises or soft spots, especially at the base must be avoided. A good pineapple should be fragrant, but if the fruit is cold, the aroma may not be apparent. Pineapple with a sour or fermented smell must never be bought.

Storage
A pineapple will get somewhat softer and juicier if it is left at room temperature for a day or two before serving. After ripening it can be refrigerated for three to five days no longer for the fruit can be damaged by the cold. They can be refrigerated in a plastic bag to help conserve its moisture content.
Plums

Selection

Plums should be plump and well coloured for their variety. If the fruit yields to gentle pressure, it is ready to eat. They can be softened at home if they are fairly firm but not rock hard. They will not however, increase in sweetness. Ripe plums will be slightly soft at the stem and tip, but check for mushy spots, or breaks in the skin.

Storage
To soften hard plums, place several in a loosely closed paper bag and leave them at room temperature for a day or two; when ready, transfer them to the refrigerator. Ripe plums can be refrigerated for up to three days.

Prunes

Selection

Check if the package of prunes is tightly sealed to guarantee cleanliness and moistness. Some prunes come vacuum- packed in cans, which keep them extra moist.

Storage

Reseal an open package as tightly as possible or transfer the prunes to an airtight container. Store them in a cool dry place or in the refrigerator for up to six months.
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Posted: Mar 18, 2008 2:17am
Apr 26, 2007
Some people (i don't know how many & have never met any doing it for years though) only have juices (veggie & fruit). They are called liquidarians.
There is obviously more coming from what's best of the food & i would consider juices as essential oils: just taking out the very best. But in the wild, how do you juice your food?
Fibers are important i think.
It is important to only eat raw, fresh & organic especially if juicing it.
Some times to cleanse, like a day/ week or even one week of only juicing is also helpful for those eating the SAD or even vegans eating cooked food.
i have met many people healing with such a diet, done for a week or regularly.
i think it is something quite useful... just like a pill to take once in a while



Does drinking your fruit and veggies count?
By Karen Collins, R.D.

Many of us have trouble meeting recommendations to
make vegetables and fruits a major part of our diets.
Is drinking more juice the solution?

Research supports categorizing juice as a nutritious
beverage, but juice cannot provide the full benefits
that come from eating solid vegetables and fruits.

Evidence continues to accumulate on the many ways that
vegetables and fruits promote good health, reducing
risk of major chronic disorders such as heart disease
and cancer. Although for more than 20 years Americans
have been told a mostly plant-based diet lowers cancer
risk, American’s consumption of produce has grown
slowly.

Surveys estimate that less than 25 percent of American
adults today meet the minimum recommendation of five
servings of fruits and vegetables daily, much less the
seven to 10 servings considered optimal. Some people
may wonder whether drinking more juice to increase our
servings of fruits and vegetables might be easier than
changing the foods we select throughout the day.

Depending on the particular choice, juice can be a
good source of important nutrients, including vitamin
C, beta-carotene, the B vitamin folate and the mineral
potassium. Juice also contains other antioxidants that
protect the body. It’s no surprise that when people
who eat low amounts of fruit and vegetables add
several servings of juice daily, the antioxidants in
their body increase, reducing risk of heart disease,
cancer and perhaps even age-related eye disease and
dementia.

However, studies show that most fruits and vegetables
contain antioxidants in the skins and peels, which do
not make it into juice. For example, one study
reports that a whole orange contains up to five times
more of one major antioxidant than a glass of orange
juice. The antioxidant is found in the white pulp and
membranes that separate the orange segments from each
other.

Mix it up

Eating a variety of vegetables and fruits, which
provide a full array of natural plant compounds, is
key to reducing cancer risk. Cancer protection comes
from far more than accumulating antioxidants. When we
eat berries, garlic and cruciferous and dark green
vegetables, for example, we get compounds that lead to
the self-destruction of cells that might develop into
cancer.

Solid fruits and vegetables also provide dietary fiber
not found in juice. Bacteria in our colon break down
soluble fiber, producing fatty acids that some studies
suggest protects our colon against cancer-causing
influences. Overall, studies have produced conflicting
results on the significance of fiber for cancer
prevention, but it is far too early to dismiss.

Eating solid fruits and vegetables can also lower risk
of cancer and heart disease by helping you reach and
maintain a healthy weight. Juice does not offer the
same weight control benefits. Fruit juice is a more
concentrated source of calories than solid fruits and
vegetables. A one-half cup serving of most vegetables
and fruit contains from 25 to 70 calories. Even a
modest serving of most fruit juice six ounces contains
70 to 105 calories. (Tomato-based juices are the
low-calorie exception.)

Furthermore, numerous studies show that we don’t tend
to make up for calories we drink by eating any less.
When we eat fiber-rich food such as fruits and
vegetables, however, we tend to feel full and thus,
eat fewer calories.

One or two daily servings of juice can certainly have
a place as part of a wide variety of fruits and
vegetables in your diet. But don’t be misled: juice is
not an equal substitute for solid fruits and
vegetables. The benefits of fruits and vegetables are
worth the effort of learning to include them
abundantly in your meals and snacks.



Visibility: Everyone
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Posted: Apr 26, 2007 9:09am
Nov 16, 2006
Focus: Health
Action Request: Various
Location: United States
EVERYDAY RAW SERIES

We created our Everyday Raw Series to help
people to go, stay and live raw (or partially raw)
on an everyday basis.  There are no dehydrated,
nut-heavy or time-consuming foods in the recipes
we created for you!  Along the same spirit, there
are no recipes which try to imitate cooked foods.

We aim to empower you to be able to truly and
simply eat raw food every day, as we know you
lead a busy life.  In addition to learning and
enjoying the recipes, each class will include an
engaging educational discussion on topics
related to raw foods and your health.

+ Class 1: Fruit Juicing
 
Saturday, Nov. 18th, 7:00-9:30pm

      (1) Wheatgrass
      (2) The Cellulite Melter
      (3) Kidney Flush
      (4) The Eliminator
      (5) Side Salad
      (6) Educational Discussion


Please visit www.trueradianthealth.com

to learn about the other 5 classes in this series!

DETAILS:
+ Class will be led by Dan McDonald,
Raw Food Chef, Coach & Healer Extraordinaire
+ All ingredients are raw, vegan and 100% organic!
+ Recipe handouts will be provided
+ Full-sized portions of all the delicious recipes will be served
+ Dan will lead an educational discussion at the class covering
such topics as juicing, raw foods, supplements, superfoods,
detox, fasting, exercise, meditation and spirituality
This class will be videotaped for future release on DVD and
your attendance signifies you agree to appear on our DVDs
(should you wish to attend but not be
videotaped please alert us in advance)

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED:
+ Please email krista@trueradianthealth.com to reserve your seat(s)
+ Limited seating available, so please RSVP soon
+ 24-hour cancellation policy

PRICING:
+ $35 for 1 class
+
$32 per class if taking 2-3 classes
+
$30 per class if taking 4-5 classes
+
$25 per class if taking all 6 classes
+
If you take 1 class and later decide to take more
classes, you remain eligible for the volume discounts


PAYMENT:
+ We accept cash, checks, PayPal or credit cards
+ Payments accepted in advance or at the door

LOCATION:
Park Slope, Brooklyn
288 5th Avenue #1F
Between 1st & 2nd Streets
Subway Directions:
http://tinyurl.com/yz2hll


QUESTIONS?
krista@trueradianthealth.com

(917) 975-7030

WEBSITE:

www.trueradianthealth.com

We look forward to hearing from you
and we hope that you enjoy your day!


Krista Peterson & Dan McDonald

True Radiant Health

Visibility: Everyone
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted: Nov 16, 2006 8:27am
Nov 5, 2006
Focus: Health
Action Request: Visit - in person
Location: United States
EVERYDAY RAW SERIES

We created our Everyday Raw Series to help
people to go, stay and live raw (or partially raw)
on an everyday basis.  There are no dehydrated,
nut-heavy or time-consuming foods in the recipes
we created for you!  Along the same spirit, there
are no recipes which try to imitate cooked foods.

We aim to empower you to be able to truly and
simply eat raw food every day, as we know you
lead a busy life.  In addition to learning and
enjoying the recipes, each class will include an
engaging educational discussion on topics
related to raw foods and your health.

+ Class 1: Fruit Juicing
 
Saturday, Nov. 18th, 7:00-9:30pm

      (1) Wheatgrass
      (2) The Cellulite Melter
      (3) Kidney Flush
      (4) The Eliminator
      (5) Side Salad
      (6) Educational Discussion


Please visit www.trueradianthealth.com

to learn about the other 5 classes in this series!

DETAILS:
+ Class will be led by Dan McDonald,
Raw Food Chef, Coach & Healer Extraordinaire
+ All ingredients are raw, vegan and 100% organic!
+ Recipe handouts will be provided
+ Full-sized portions of all the delicious recipes will be served
+ Dan will lead an educational discussion at the class covering
such topics as juicing, raw foods, supplements, superfoods,
detox, fasting, exercise, meditation and spirituality
This class will be videotaped for future release on DVD and
your attendance signifies you agree to appear on our DVDs
(should you wish to attend but not be
videotaped please alert us in advance)

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED:
+ Please email krista@trueradianthealth.com to reserve your seat(s)
+ Limited seating available, so please RSVP soon
+ 24-hour cancellation policy

PRICING:
+ $35 for 1 class
+
$32 per class if taking 2-3 classes
+
$30 per class if taking 4-5 classes
+
$25 per class if taking all 6 classes
+
If you take 1 class and later decide to take more
classes, you remain eligible for the volume discounts


PAYMENT:
+ We accept cash, checks, PayPal or credit cards
+ Payments accepted in advance or at the door

LOCATION:
Park Slope, Brooklyn
288 5th Avenue #1F
Between 1st & 2nd Streets
Subway Directions:
http://tinyurl.com/yz2hll


QUESTIONS?
krista@trueradianthealth.com

(917) 975-7030

WEBSITE:

www.trueradianthealth.com

We look forward to hearing from you
and we hope that you enjoy your day!


Krista Peterson & Dan McDonald

True Radiant Health

Visibility: Everyone
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted: Nov 5, 2006 9:53am
Jun 12, 2006
Focus: Health
Action Request: Various
Location: United States

Selling Your Kids on Fruit

Would you like to launch a Guerrilla Advertising Campaign on your family? Did you know that seeing an appealing image of food more than three times makes most people crave that food?

If you look closely you'll see that most cooked food and junk food advertisements use water droplets throughout their ads to make your mouth water. But really it's the water that is appealing to you. They are using your natural desire for water to sell you their dry packaged food!

When advertising to children half of the ads use pictures of fruit for the same purpose. They know that this is the food that children naturally crave. They use the real allure of fruit to seduce the children into eating junk. They even say "with real fruit flavor!"

Why don't we ever see really appealing commercials for fruit? Well, there's not nearly as much money in fruit as in packaged foods. And you can't patent a fruit.

So we've come up with a new project for our "Take A Fruit Break" Campaign that will allow you to take matters in to your own hands and compete with the billion-dollar junk food advertisers. We've uploaded a series of beautiful posters of fruit that you can download for free and put up in your house, your kitchen, your school, your office, your church, your community center, and everywhere else you and your children can see them, and you'll re-program your natural desire to eat and drink the healthiest food known to man!

By putting up mouth-watering fruit pictures where we can see them several times an hour we can counteract the hundreds of junk food images that bombard our senses daily.

You can download our free fruit posters at http://www.TakeAFruitBreak.com/psas.

Visibility: Everyone
Tags: , , , ,
Posted: Jun 12, 2006 8:54am

 

 
 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.

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18
by Ys A.
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\\nauthor: Ralph Nader\\r\\n\\r\\nAn epidemic of sky-rocketing medical costs has afflicted our country and grown to obscene proportions. Medical bills are bloated with waste, redundancy, profiteering, fraud and outrageous over-billing. Much is wrong with t...
Jan
13
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\\nDear Friends:\\r\\n\\r\\n\\r\\ n\\r\\nMy two current books have been published and are available for sale through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and the publisher’s website, http://sbprabooks.com/Max Hammer. Reading these books can be very helpful for anyone...
by Fred H.
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\\nA stainless steel tank the size of a basketball court lies buried in the sandy soil of southeastern Washington state, an aging remnant of U.S. efforts to win World War II. The tank holds enough radioactive waste to fill an Olympic-sized swimming poo...
by Fred H.
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\\r\\nThe Olympic Peninsula is home to important state-owne d forests and many of our state’s most iconic creatures. To keep these forest ecosystems healthy, WEC and our partners at Conservation Northwe st and Olympic Forest Coal...