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Aug 6, 2007
Focus: Health
Action Request: Various
Location: United States
1)
 
The Codex Alimentarius is a threat to the freedom of people to choose natural healing and alternative medicine and nutrition. Ratified by the World Health Organization, and going into Law in the United States in 2009, the threat to health freedom has never been greater. This is the first part of a series of talks by Dr. Rima Laibow MD, available on DVD from the Natural Solutions Foundation, an non-profit organization dedicated to educating people about how to stop Codex Alimentarius from taking away our right to freely choose nutritional health
 
Nutricide - Criminalizing Natural Health, Vitamins, and Herbs
 
2)
 
Prescription for Disaster is an in-depth investigation into the symbiotic relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, the FDA, lobbyists, lawmakers, medical schools, and researchers, and the impact this has on consumers and their health care. During this thorough investigation, we take a close look at patented drugs, why they are so readily prescribed by doctors, the role insurance companies and HMO's play in promoting compliance, and the problem of rising health care costs. We examine the marketing and public relations efforts on behalf of the pharmaceutical companies, including sales reps, medical journals and conferences. Further, we look at alternatives to traditional pharmacology and drug therapy, such as vitamins and nutritional supplements, and why they are often perceived as a competitive threat to the drug manufacturers. Alternative therapies also include diet, exercise and a healthy lifestyle.

Prescription for Disaster takes you on a journey through the tangled web of big business, the way disease is treated today, and the consequences we suffer as a society. 
 

Prescription For Disaster

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2502546838698762400&q=disaster&total=18737&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=1

3)

Excellent documentary showing how dangerous artificial sweetner Aspartame is. From its history, to its effects this video is enough to shock anyone into really looking at there food labels next time they shop. Aspartame is a toxic food that came into the world as an investment By Donald Rumsfeld, while ignoring the deadly effects the tests showed. Take a good look at this video, it could save lives.

Sweet Misery - A Poisoned World
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-566922170441334340&q=aspartame&total=201&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=5

 

4)

 

In this video, Christopher Bryson, an award-winning journalist and former producer at the BBC, discusses the findings of his new book The Flouride Deception.

EARLY REVIEWS of The Fluoride Deception:

"Bryson marshals an impressive amount of research to demonstrate fluoride?s harmfulness, the ties between leading fluoride researchers and the corporations who funded and benefited from their research, and what he says is the duplicity with which fluoridation was sold to the people. The result is a compelling challenge to the reigning dental orthodoxy, which should provoke renewed scientific scrutiny and public debate."

-- PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

 

The Fluoride Deception (Interview With Christopher Bryson)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7319752042352089988&q=deception&total=4462&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=1

 

 

5)

Dr Malcolm Kendrick speaks about
World Health Organisation data
gathered in their MONI-CA study.
MONItoring Trends in
CArdiovascular Disease.

 

From the EU Monica WHO data I took all data on fat intake and CHD rate from virtually all European countries for1998-1999
The data was then regressed using Quattro Pro. The regression line was drawn using the results. Both analyses show that doubling the national fat intake reduces the national Coronary Heart Disease rate by half!
Total Fat (%of diet)
Multiple R 0.667; Regression "p" = 5.43 E-07
Saturated Fat Intake (%of diet)
Multiple R = 0.584; Regression = "p" < 0.00001

 

MONICA
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=i8SSCNaaDcE#GU5U2spHI_4

 

6)

 

Elevated Cholesterol does not actually cause heart disease; excess levels of cholesterol in the blood can complicate an existing cardiovascular condition. For this reason millions take statin drugs and risk the potential side effects to their liver. Alternatives to statins have come along way and now Natural Alternatives are as good or better that the leading statin drugs. Guggulipids, Pantethine, phytosterols, and many fibers in the right combination have proven to be as effective as dangerous statin drugs. Clinical Studies have proven that the right combination of Guggulipids, Pantethine, phytosterols, and many fibers can normalize elevated cholesterol levels in as little as 90 days. Ratios of HDL and LDL can be improved by making simple changes to your diet. Ideally, cholesterol levels within reason are not as important as proper HDL to LDL ratios. Elevated cholesterol can be reduced significantly, up to 20 points or more, in about 90 days. Low fat diets and cholesterol have very little to do with each other. The body makes up to 80 percent of all the cholesterol in your body while the rest comes from dietary intake. Since cholesterol in the diet makes up such a small amount of the total cholesterol in the body, low cholesterol diets are often ineffective in controlling the elevation. Elevated cholesterol is a liver problem and must be approached by detoxifying the liver and nourishing it with key nutrients such as Guggulipids, Pantethine, phytosterols, fiber. Lecithin is another agent that is very helpful for liver function and as such can help to regulate cholesterol in the bloodstream The formula we have developed here at The Institute of Nutritional Science not only helps to lower cholesterol safely without the dangers of statins, but we can also improve the HDL and LDL ratios at the same time.

 

Dr Whiting on Natural Cholesterol Management 

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ieMY9GWToRA&NR=1

 

7)

 

Six McDonalds-munching Americans eat 100% vegan live foods for a month. Medical results are fantastic. Doctors and experts are interviewed including Gabriel Cousens, MD and David Wolfe. Raw for 30-Days

Raw for 30-Days will document the journey of five Americans suffering from Adult Onset Type II Diabetes, who undergo a radical 30-day diet and lifestyle change in the hope of reversing or reducing their insulin dependence. The film will show the eating habits that led to the development of this disease and will posit an alternative approach to living and eating, one in which foods can heal and hold the potential to reverse Diabetes. We will recruit subjects who have been subsisting on a standard American junk food diet and who are now insulin dependent and Diabetic. Those selected will journey to the Tree of Life Rejuvenation Center in Arizona to undergo a 30-day health regimen consisting of 100% raw organic living foods that are purported to heal Diabetes. We will select a diverse group of subjects, representative of the different segments of the population most affected by this epidemic. Examples include a Native American from a Reservation, an African American from an urban Northeast city, a Mexican American living in the western US and a Caucasian person from the mid-west or a Southern city such as Chattanooga, TN

 

Reversing Diabetes Naturally
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1407054601065907544

 

8)

 

Neal Barnard MD discusses the science behind food additions. Willpower is not to blame: chocolate, cheese, meat, and sugar release opiate-like substances. Dr. Barnard also discusses how industry, aided by government, exploits these natural cravings, pushing us to eat more and more unhealthy foods. A plant-based (vegan) diet is the solution to avoid many of these problems. Neal Barnard is the founder of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM)

 

Chocolate, Cheese, Meat, and Sugar -- Physically Addictive Foods

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3214100593069532942&q=sugar+health&total=328&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=2

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Posted: Aug 6, 2007 12:05am
Jul 10, 2007
Focus: Civil Rights
Action Request: Think About
Location: United States

Human Beings and Other Animals as Utterly Distinct Categories.

http://human-nonhuman.blogspot.com/2007/06/human-beings-and-other-animals-as.html

How societies build and maintain speciesism.

Sociologist Keith Tester [1] outlines the absolute necessity, as well as the practical pragmatism, of conceptualising ‘others’ and ‘enemies’ in terms of nonhuman animal categories. For example, in relation to the infamous My Lai massacre in which a company of highly trained North American soldiers, as he puts it, ‘murdered and raped their way through a whole community’, Tester found that often the soldiers believed they were not fighting other human beings.

Biologist and feminist Lynda Birke [2] argues that ‘human’ and ‘animal’ categories are usually regarded as utterly distinct. Human beings commonly conceive of themselves as human by strictly reserving the label ‘animal(s)’ for other animal categories - or for certain demonised human individuals or groups. Thus, it is generally only seen as appropriate for ‘bad’ or ‘deficient’ humans to be labelled as animals.

In a sense, these understandings also account in part for some of the utility in dehumanisation processes, a common feature in human warfare. In other words, categorical distinctions are constructed as things that matter, and the label ‘animal’ ultimately becomes what ‘we’ are not. Furthermore, it is a label most human beings would not want to associate themselves with.

Birke says the word ‘animal’ may be seen as a ‘cultural standard’ against which human beings may set themselves. Moreover, humans are in general assumed to be ‘better’ than those placed in ‘animal’ categories. Hence, football (soccer) supporters, at least those who ‘go around fighting and wrecking places’, find themselves called ‘animals’ or even ‘worse than animals’. This linguistic formulation, Birke suggests, is to signify that human beings are ‘out of control’, and that suggestively means behaving sub-humanly. Displays of ‘animal-like behaviour’, with notions of ‘the beast within’, when applied to human beings, are normatively pejorative.

According to Birke, a now obsolete dictionary definition of ‘beasts’ used to include human beings but ‘later usage’ specifically and deliberately separates ‘us’ from ‘them’. Thus, in modern usage, the term ‘beast’ is often associated with passive but strong - but also probably stupid - ‘work animals’, within categories of nonhuman animals classified as ‘livestock’. On the other hand, the term ‘beast’ is connected to ideas suggesting ‘evil forces’: the ‘devil’ himself is part-beast after all [3].

Joanna Bourke [4] argues that authorities who sent ‘boys’ to war were extremely wary of the potentially dangerous ‘creatures’ who might return; those who were perhaps brutalised by war experiences and thus may subsequently represent a beast-like threat to their own friends, families, sweethearts and spouses. Given the negative cultural meanings associated with the term ‘animal’, it is perhaps not surprising that in Northern English prison argot (and in tabloid newspaper headlines), the label ‘beast’ is often bestowed by ‘regular cons’ on both unconvicted and convicted sex offenders - especially those who have allegedly sexually assaulted children. These human individuals are also often regarded as passive, and perhaps weak and stupid, but who are at the same time ‘evil’, &lsquoredatory’ and ‘animal-like’ at least in their sexual proclivities, &lsquoicking on’ children because they are putatively incapable of a sexual relationship with a grown-up person.

Stephen Clark [5] sees such notions imbued with ‘folk-taxonomic meanings’, carrying moral significance. Treating people ‘like an animal’ means treating them ‘without due regard for their preferences, or their status as free and equal partners in the human community’. Again, the importance of community in these constructions is clear. Indeed, Clark adds that, ‘To behave ‘like an animal’ is to pay no regard to the normal inhibitions and ceremonies of that community’. Such ‘creatures’ surely cannot be community insiders because they do not know how to return friendship; they do not know how to keep or make bargains, they cannot play a social contractual role as they are ‘forever excluded from distinctly ‘human’ practices’. Once ‘outside the realm of justice’, all ‘animals’ - human or otherwise - may be more easily enslaved, hurt, or killed, and in great numbers.


[1] Tester, K. (1997) Moral Culture. London: Sage.

[2] Birke, L. (1994) Feminism, Animals and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Buckingham, Phil.: Open University Press.

[3] Thomas, K. (1983) Man and the Natural World: Changing Attitudes in England 1500-1800. London: Allen Lane.

[4] Bourke, J. (2000) An Intimate History of Killing. London: Granta.

[5] Clark, S. R. L. (1991) ‘Animals’, in J. O. Urmson and J. Ree (eds.) The Concise Encyclopedia of Western Philosophy and Philosophers. London: Routledge.

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Posted: Jul 10, 2007 3:20am
Jun 13, 2007
Name: Greg and Kaitlyn
Type: Tribute (for the living)
To Honor: Individual(s)
Location: , United States

'I'm glad they'll have each other for this next step'

Brother and sister who share rare genetic condition to share alternative health-care treatment experience
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2007/jun/08/im_glad_theyll_have_each_other_next_step/?breaking_news

Originally published — 7:23 p.m., June 8, 2007
Updated — 10:50 p.m., June 8, 2007

Editors note: Recent Gulf Coast High School graduate Gregory Lang has battled cancer since he was 3 years old. In February, doctors said Greg had about six months to live. Greg, his sister, Kaitlyn, and their late father, Gregory Weber Sr., suffer from a rare genetic condition, Li- Fraumeni syndrome, causing recurring cancer. The Naples Daily News is following his continuing story.

Gregory and Kaitlyn Lang are trading their childhoods for a chance at adulthood.

They will say farewell to typical teenage fare. Goodbye burgers, tacos and pizza. No more ice cream, cake or cookies.

The pair plans to forgo all temptation — meat, dairy, bread — for the rest of their lives.

Starting Sunday, they will go cold turkey — without the turkey.

Greg, 18, will make the trip to Hippocrates Health Institute in West Palm Beach out of necessity, to prolong his life with cancer past doctors’ grim prognosis.

His sister, 16-year-old Kaitlyn, who battled leukemia as a child, will adopt Hippocrates’ raw vegan eating program in hopes of never needing to fight again.

They share a common goal: to make their lives of strenuous sacrifice as long as possible. And for the next three weeks, they’ll share a room, a schedule and, maybe, some inspiration.

"This is a huge step for me, as a mom, because I’ve never left either one of their sides," Ann Lang said. "But I keep focusing on the end result, and I’m so proud of them.

"They need to do this for themselves. My holding their hands can’t help them anymore."

Greg’s necessity

The alternative health-care center is nutritional boot camp. For three weeks, Kaitlyn and Greg will learn to dismiss their teenage cravings through a rigorous schedule of seminars, food preparation courses, workouts and meditation periods.

If the program is successful, Greg’s cancer could be reduced to a manageable state, increasing his life expectancy by months, years, or even decades.

If it’s not, Greg said, nothing, not even hope, will be lost.

"It won’t be a waste of time," Greg explained, his smooth, baby face stony with determination. "If it doesn’t work, for some reason, I’ll know I tried my best with that option, and I’ll have to try something else."

"That’s my baby," Ann said, beaming. "Always optimistic."

After receiving a terminal diagnosis in February, Greg sprung to action, weeding through dozens of options as stories of possible solutions poured in from generous strangers.

As the fatigue and back pain grew, from expanding cancer spots on his pelvis, femur and spine, Greg continued to balk at the idea of more chemotherapy. Previous chemotherapy treatments made Greg sick, and did little to improve his outlook.

The addition of chemotherapy chemicals to Greg’s already fragile body could destroy his immune system, rather than repair it.

"Chemo didn’t work the first time, and doing it now would be the same," he said. "Chemo is a poison. It doesn’t just kill the bad stuff, it kills the good stuff, too."

Greg weighed his options, and settled on the somewhat obscure Hippocrates program, which he learned about when a stranger sent information to Greg’s Gulf Coast High School principal.

"It just makes the most sense," he said. "It can’t hurt me at all. It can only help."

By weeding out all preservatives from his diet, doctors at Hippocrates hope to cleanse Greg’s body, boosting his immune system as he battles his disease. Adding an exercise routine will increase Greg’s energy levels, and hopefully his waning appetite.

"My goal is to help improve my situation," he explained. "I want to have some more time, as much time as possible, and improve the quality of that time.

"I don’t think it’s going to be difficult to make the change, because I know it’s how it has to be."

Kaitlyn’s choice

As her brother watched, Kaitlyn spent this week gorging herself on taboo foods: meatloaf, Chick-Fil-A, pasta.

"It’s so funny to see their two different personalities," Ann laughed. "Greg wants to stop eating those things now, because he figures, ‘Why bother?’ and Kaitlyn wants all she can get."

"I just want to keep going with it," Kaitlyn reasoned. "I never want to eat meat again, so I’m getting all I can now."

Unlike Greg, Kaitlyn had a difficult time deciding whether she would visit Hippocrates and adopt the fruit and veggie life plan.

Kaitlyn suffers from the same genetic condition as her brother, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, turning the possibility of recurring cancer almost into a certainty. Because she is currently healthy, it may be more of a challenge for Kaitlyn to stay motivated.

"Mine’s a self-choice. He kind of has to do it," she said, motioning to Greg. "It’ll be tough, but I really want this, so I guess that will be my inspiration."

By choosing the responsibility of maintaining the stringent plan, the Gulf Coast 10th-grader is sacrificing her youth sooner than her brother, who graduated last month.

During her bout with leukemia at age 8, Kaitlyn put on extra weight, from the steroids she was forced to take. Dropping the few unwanted pounds will be the icing on the cake she can no longer eat.

"It’ll be hard, because I don’t want to give up eating the things my friends eat," she said. "I’ve worked so hard to get to where I am, fighting cancer, and I want to finish what I’ve started."

Lifestyle overhaul

The Hippocrates plan can’t be called a "diet." It’s a far cry from the popular Atkins or South Beach diets.

Adoption of the vegan eating regiment is nothing short of a lifestyle overhaul.

"You can’t go back," Kaitlyn said. "If you were to start eating meat or preservatives again right away, you would get sick."

"It’s going to be life-changing, like having a baby," Ann explained, as her children, and Greg’s 16-year-old girlfriend, Brianna Hanson, laughed at the analogy.

"Well, it is!" she cried out, hushing them. "It’s going to be completely different from everything you’ve ever known."

Ann, the kids’ adopted father, Tim Lang, and Brianna admitted they will be forced to make some big changes in compliance with Greg and Kaitlyn’s new lifestyle.

"I don’t think I’ll have a choice," Brianna giggled. "It’s going to be hard for (Greg and Kaitlyn), but it’s going to be really good for them."

"I think I’m going to learn from the kids," Ann seconded. "In time, we’ll ease into it, just like any other change."

Though they’ll be shirking their teenage eating habits, Greg and Kaitlyn won’t leave their childhoods completely behind. The twosome have already conspired to rig their wireless laptop computers so they can watch television while they are away.

"I think this will be a great re-bonding for them, without any outside clutter," Ann said, rolling her eyes as the restless teens battled for room on the family’s leather couch.

"They’ve gone through so much together in their lives. I’m glad they’ll have each other for this next step."

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Posted: Jun 13, 2007 12:26am
Mar 13, 2006
Type: Tribute (for the living)
To Honor: Individual(s)
Location: , United States
March 10, 2006
Books of The Times | 'American Green'

Why Grass Really Is Always Greener on the Other Side

Many of the approximately 60 million Americans with lawns can understand the feeling. A well-tended yard is not only personal territory, to be defended unto death, but also a work of art. Like a painting, it has form and color. Like a child, it is alive. No wonder feelings run high, and the lawn, as a canvas for personal expression, engages the suburban American male at the deepest possible level. Americans like Jerry Tucker, who turned his yard into a replica of the 12th hole at Augusta National Golf Club.

The often-crazed love affair between Americans and their lawns is Ted Steinberg's subject in "American Green." Mr. Steinberg, an environmental historian at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, likens this relationship, and the insane pursuit of lawn perfection, to obsessive-compulsive disorder, and he may very well be right. That would at least explain the behavior of a homeowner who clips her entire front yard with a pair of hand shears, or Richard Widmark's reaction on waking up in the hospital after a severe lawn mower accident in 1990. "The question I asked the doctors was not 'Will I ever act again?' " he later recalled, "but 'Will I ever mow again?' "

How did a plant species ill suited to the United States, and the patrician taste for a rolling expanse of green take root from the shores of the Atlantic to the desiccated terrain of Southern California? The short answer is that it didn't, not until after the Civil War. Although Washington and Jefferson had lawns, most citizens did not have the hired labor needed to cut a field of grass with scythes. Average homeowners either raised vegetables in their yards or left them alone. If weeds sprouted, fine. If not, that was fine, too.

Toward the end of the 19th century, suburbs appeared on the American scene, along with the sprinkler, greatly improved lawn mowers, new ideas about landscaping and a shorter work week. A researcher investigating the psychology of suburbanites in 1948 observed shrewdly that the American work ethic coexisted uneasily with free time, and that "intense care of the lawn is an excellent resolution of this tension." At least until the moles arrive.

Mr. Steinberg cannot decide whether he is writing a cultural history, an environmental exposé or a series of Dave Barry columns. As cultural history, "American Green" is relentlessly superficial, a grab bag of airy generalizations and decrepit clichés about the cold war and the conformist 1950's. As environmental exposé, it is confused and poorly explained. It is impossible, reading Mr. Steinberg on lawn-care products, to assess risks. At times, it sounds as if any homeowner spreading the standard lawn fertilizers and herbicides might as well take out a gun and shoot his family. A few pages later, the environmental threat seems trivial.

Sometimes, he simply punts. Building a case against power mowers, which Mr. Steinberg regards as unsafe at any speed, he introduces the story of a "lawn professional" who lost the fingers on both hands while trying to keep a wayward mower from rolling into a lake. This might be a damning piece of evidence if Mr. Steinberg did not then add, sheepishly, that "perhaps this is a suburban legend." Half-serious, intellectually incoherent, "American Green" shambles along like this, scattering bits and pieces of history, sociology and consumer advice as it goes.

There are just enough fascinating bits to keep the pages turning. It is gratifying to learn that grass really is greener on the other side of the fence. An observer looking down at his own lawn sees brown dirt along with green grass blades, but only grass blades next door, because of the angle of vision. It is useful to focus on one of the pet claims of the lawn-care industry, that a lawn 50 feet square produces enough oxygen to satisfy the respiratory needs of a family of four. This is probably true, but, as Mr. Steinberg points out, superfluous, since there is no oxygen shortage on Earth.

Mr. Steinberg does make the case fairly convincingly that the pursuit of the perfect lawn cannot be explained without golf, which has played on the homeowner's weak sense of self-esteem by rubbing his face in fantasy images. Perfection at Augusta requires a team of specialists and a multimillion-dollar investment in infrastructure. The average golf green gets more pampering and primping than Heidi Klum's cheekbones, but that is the lawn that suburbanites want. Companies like Scotts have convinced them that to achieve it, they need to follow a regimen of constant seeding, watering, fertilizing and herbiciding.

The future looks troubled for the American lawn. Some homeowners have given up entirely, paving over their yards to create more parking space. Others are embracing the native-plant movement and turning their lawns into miniature prairies and meadows. Nellie Shriver, of the Fruitarian Network, stopped mowing for moral reasons. "It is impossible to mow the grass without harming it," she said. "We believe grass has some sort of consciousness, that it has feelings."

Even more alarming, for the lawn-care industry, is the kind of post-lawn sensibility exhibited by an Atlanta real estate broker. "When something bores me, I get rid of it," she said. "Lawns bore me."

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Posted: Mar 13, 2006 8:49am

 

 
 
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