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Jun 10, 2012


Thousands of Tubes Damaged at Calif Nuclear Plant by fritzideyanira

Over 1,300 tubes containing radioactive water inside San Onofre nuclear plant's steam generators in California has been reportedly damaged enough that they need to be taken out of service.

To date, the safety of tubing that snakes around the plant's 4 steam generators were installed in a multimillion-dollar upgrade three years ago.

According to the company's official statement on Monday, 807 tubes in Unit 3 and 510 tubes from Unit 2 reactors were retired. Every generator has almost 10,000 tubes and the total number of plugged tubes would not affect a proper operation of the plant.

Their statement came just days after an executive from Edison International announced that the firm plans to restart at least one of the reactors in the coming months. They are apparently planning which reactor will run at reduced energy for several months at least, because engineers are of the opinion that it will solve the problem of vibration -- something that the firm suspects is causing the unexpected wear in the alloy tubes.

The chairman of Edison, SCE's parent company, reportedly called investors to notify them of the premature wear found in around 1% of 39,000 tubes in the generators.

A nuclear watchdog Norton Medical and Scientific Research & Biotechnology issued a warning, saying in effect that it seems «the new steam generators are falling apart and Edison doesn't know why. It would be foolhardy to restart, even at reduced power, under the current circumstances.»

The nuclear plant is owned by the Riverside City together with San Diego Gas and Electric and SCE. A joint statement released last week by the California Independent System Operator and Edison gave possible dates this June for planning. However, government regulators were quick to assert that there is no timetable for a restart -- something that would still need a federal approval.

The alert concerns stemmed from an incident in January when the third reactor was shut off after a tube broke. But although radiation has escaped during that time, officials were quick to assure residents and workers that there was no imminent danger. Earlier that month, the second unit was shut down for its regular maintenance but investigators discovered instead of premature wear on hundreds of tubes that were only installed 2 years ago by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. (The first unit operated on 1968 was dismantled in 1992.)

The tubes stand for a crucial safety barrier, that is, if a tube breaks then there is considerable chance for radioactivity to escape onto the atmosphere. Serious leaks could also use up the protective cooling water employed in a reactor.

SCE estimates that the repair expenses could cost about USD 55 to 65 million, aside from the initial USD 30 million it has spent to replace the output from the 2 reactors earlier this year.

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Posted: Jun 10, 2012 11:54pm
Apr 17, 2012

http://bradkepler.blog.fc2.com/

 

Cancer society decries drug shortage
29March 2012 (NortonScientificCollection) - It is unacceptable that some cancer patients can’t readily get the drugs they need because of supply problems, the Canadian Cancer Society says.
The society is hearing from worried patients and doctors across the country, said Dan Demers, the group's director of public issues.
"We shouldn't have to wait for a crisis to respond," said Demers.
The cancer society urged the federal government to:
Ensure there is mandatory listing of unavailable drugs by drug manufacturer.
Develop early warning systems to identify potential drug shortages.
Put systems in place to prevent shortages from escalating.
Work with other jurisdictions to investigate the root causes of the shortages and act to prevent them where possible.
Canada's supply of injectable drugs such as painkillers, antibiotics and anesthetics became more precarious following a fire in the boiler room at Sandoz Canada's plant in Boucherville, Que.
"Production has resumed in the portion of the plant that was not directly affected by the incident, which took place on March 4," the company said in a email to CBC News on Monday. "Our objective is to restore previous levels of supply as soon as possible, and we will make every effort to meet medical needs, while ensuring consistent high quality standards."

Rationing supplies

The company was unable to quantify how much more capacity it now has.
Anthony Dale, vice-president of policy and public affairs at the Ontario Hospital Association in Toronto, called it "outrageous" that one company could have this kind of effect on drug supplies.
Dale also called for a national strategy, noting hospitals are takininventory of their supplies and trying to share and to compound or carefully mix drugs from raw ingredients under sterile conditions.

Hospitals and drug purchasers have been holding daily conference calls to mitigate shortages. Doctors are carefully selecting patients who can swallow to give them oral forms of the medications, said Myrella Roy, executive director of the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists in Ottawa.
Last week, officials with Alberta Health Services asked doctors to conserve injectable medications. Cancer patients were asked to get oral anti-nausea medications instead of injections before chemotherapy treatment.
In mid-February, Sandoz informed hospitals and other health-care clients that it was partially closing its plant inBoucherville while it improved its process to meet U.S. safety standards, the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society said in a news release.
The company told the anesthesiologists group that dozens of critical medications will no longer be manufactured while others will be available on "allocation" based upon previous usage, a manufacturing and delivery situation that could last 12 to 18 months, the group said in their release.
Health Canada said last week it is working to identify alternate sources of supply and expedite approvals for any drug companies that meet Canadian standards for safety and effectiveness.
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Posted: Apr 17, 2012 8:40pm
Apr 17, 2012

http://www.squidoo.com/norton-scientific-invisible-man2
 

Invisible Man is a novel written by Ralph Ellison, and the only one that he published during his lifetime (his other novels were published posthumously). It won him the National Book Award in 1953. The novel addresses many of the social and intellectual issues facing African-Americans in the early twentieth century, including black nationalism, the relationship between black identity andMarxism, and the reformist racialpolicies of Booker T. Washington, as well as issues of individuality and personal identity.

In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Invisible Man nineteenth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005

Historical background
In his introduction to the 30th Anniversary Edition of Invisible Man,[2] Ellison says that he started writingthe book in a barn inWaitsfield, Vermont in the summer of 1945 while on sick leave from the Merchant Marine and that the novel continued to preoccupy him in various parts of New York City. In an interview in The Paris Review 1955,[3] Ellison states that the book took five years to complete with one year off for what he termed an "ill-conceived short novel." Invisible Man was published as a whole in 1952; however, copyright dates show the initial publication date as 1947, 1948, indicating that Ellison had published a section of the book prior to full publication. That section was the famous "Battle Royal" scene, which had been shown to Cyril Connolly, the editor of Horizonmagazine by Frank Taylor, one of Ellison's early supporters.

Ellison states in his National Book Award acceptance speech that he considered the novel's chief significance to be its experimental attitude. Rejecting the idea of social protest-as Ellison would later put it-he did not want to write another protest novel, and also seeing the highly regarded styles of Naturalism and Realism too limiting to speak to the broader issues of race and America, Ellison created an open style, one that did not restrict his ideas to a movement but was more free-flowing in its delivery. What Ellison finally settled on was a style based heavily upon modern symbolism. It was the kind of symbolism that Ellison first encountered in the poemThe Waste Land,[4] by T. S. Eliot. Ellison had read this poem as a freshman at the Tuskegee Institute and was immediately impressed by The Waste Land's ability to merge his two greatest passions, that of music and literature, for it was in The Waste Land that he first saw jazz set to words. When asked later what he had learned from the poem, Ellison responded: imagery, and also improvisation-techniques he had only before seen in jazz.

Ellison always believed that he would be a musician first and a writer second, and yet even so he had acknowledged that writing provided him a "growing satisfaction." It was a "covert process," according to Ellison: "a refusal of his right hand to let his left hand know what it was doing."[5]

Plot introduction
Invisible Man is narrated in the first person by the protagonist, an unnamed African American man who considers himself socially invisible. His character may have been inspired by Ellison's own life. The narrator may be conscious of his audience, writing as a way to make himself visible to mainstream culture; the book is structured as if it were the narrator's autobiography although it begins in the middle of his life.

The story is told from the narrator's present, looking back into his past. Thus, the narrator has hindsight in how his story is told, as he is already aware of the outcome.

In the Prologue, Ellison's narrator tells readers, "I live rent-free in a building rented strictly to whites, in a section of the basement that was shut off and forgotten during the nineteenth century." In this secret place, the narrator creates surroundings that are symbolically illuminated with 1,369 lights. He says, "My hole is warm and full of light. Yes, full of light. I doubt if there is a brighter spot in all New York than this hole of mine, and I do not exclude Broadway." The protagonist explains that light is an intellectual necessity for him since "the truth is the light and light is the truth." From this underground perspective, the narrator attempts to make sense out of his life, experiences, and position in American society.

Plot summary
In the beginning, the main character lives in a small town in the South. He is a model student, even being named his high school's valedictorian. Having written and delivered an excellent paper about the struggles of the average black man, he gets to tell his speech to a group of white men, who force him to participate in a series of degrading events. After finally giving his speech, he gets a scholarship to an all-black college that is clearly modeled on the Tuskegee Institute.

During his junior year at the college, the narrator takes Mr. Norton, a visiting rich white trustee, on a drive in the country. He accidentally drives to the house of Jim Trueblood, a black man living on the college's outskirts, who impregnated his own daughter. Trueblood, though disgraced by his fellow blacks, has found greater support from whites. After hearing Trueblood's story and giving Trueblood a hundred dollar bill, Mr. Norton faints, then asks for some alcohol to help his condition, prompting the narrator to take him to a local tavern. At the Golden Day tavern, Norton passes in and out of consciousness as World War I veteransbeing treated at the nearby mental hospital for various mental health issues occupy the bar and a fight breaks out among them. One of the veterans claims to be a doctor and tends to Mr. Norton. The dazed andconfused Mr. Norton is not fully aware of what's going on, as the veteran doctor chastises the actions of the trustee and the young black college student. Through all the chaos, the narrator manages to get the recovered Mr. Norton back to the campus after a day of unusual events.

Upon returning to the school he is fearful of the reaction of the day's incidents from college president Dr. Bledsoe. At any rate, insight into Bledsoe's knowledge of the events and the narrator's future at the campus is somewhat prolonged as an important visitor arrives. The narrator views a sermon by the highly respected Reverend Homer A. Barbee. Barbee, who is blind, delivers a speech about the legacy of the college's founder, with such passion and resonance that he comes vividly alive to the narrator; his voice makes up for his blindness. The narrator is so inspired by the speech that he feels impassioned like never before to contribute to the college's legacy. However, all his dreams are shattered as a meeting with Bledsoe reveals his fate. Fearing that the college's funds will be jeopardized by the incidents that occurred, Bledsoe immediately expels the narrator. While the Invisible Man once aspired to be like Bledsoe, he realizes that the man has portrayed himself as a black stereotype in order to succeed in the white-dominated society. This serves as the first epiphany among many in the narrator realizing his invisibility. This epiphany is not yet complete when Bledsoe gives him several letters of recommendation to help him get a job under the assumption that he could return upon earning enough money for the next semester. Upon arriving in New York, the narrator distributes the letters with no success. Eventually, the son of one of the people to whom he sent a letter takes pity on him and shows him an opened copy of the letter; it reveals that Bledsoe never had any intentions of letting the narrator return and sent him to New York to get rid of him.

Acting upon the son's suggestion, the narrator eventually gets a job in the boiler room of a paint factory in a company renowned for its white paints. The man in charge of the boiler room, Lucius Brockway, is extremely paranoid and thinks that the narrator has come to take his job. He is also extremely loyal to the company's owner, who once paid him a personal visit. When the narrator tells him about a union meeting he happened upon, Brockway is outraged, and attacks him. They fight, and Brockway tricks him into turning a wrong valve and causing a boiler to explode. Brockway escapes, but the narrator is hospitalized after the blast. While recovering, the narrator overhears doctors discussing him as a mental health patient. He learns through their discussion that shock treatment has been performed on him.

After the shock treatments, the narrator attempts to return to his residence when he feels overwhelmed by a certain dizziness and faints on the streets of Harlem. He is taken to the residence of a kind, old-fashioned woman by the name of Mary. Mary is down-to-earth and reminds the narrator of his relatives in the South and friends at the college. Mary somewhat serves as a mother figure for the narrator. While living there, he happens upon an eviction of an elderly black couple and makes an impassioned speech decrying the action. Soon, however, police arrive, and the narrator is forced to escape over several building tops. Upon reaching safety, he is confronted by a man named Jack who followed him and implores him to join a group called The Brotherhood that is a thinly veiled version of the Communist Party and claims to be committed to social change and betterment of the conditions in Harlem. The narrator agrees.

The narrator is at first happy to be making a difference in the world, "making history," in his new job. While for the most part his rallies go smoothly, he soon encounters trouble from Ras the Exhorter, a fanatical black nationalist in the vein of Marcus Garvey who believes that the Brotherhood is controlled by whites. Ras tells this to the narrator and Tod Clifton, a youth leader of the Brotherhood, neither of whom seem to be swayed by his words.

When he returns to Harlem, Tod Clifton has disappeared. When the narrator finds him, he realizes that Clifton has become disillusioned with the Brotherhood, and has quit. Clifton is selling dancing Sambo dolls on the street, mocking the organization he once believed in. He soon dies. At Clifton's funeral, the narrator rallies crowds to win back his former widespread Harlem support and delivers a rousing speech. However, he is criticized in a clandestine meeting with Brother Jack and other members for not being scientific in his arguments at the funeral; angered, he begins to argue in retaliation, causing Jack to lose his temper and accidentally make his glass eye fly out of one of his sockets. The narrator realizes that the half-blind Jack has never really seen him either.

He buys sunglasses and a hat as a disguise, and is mistaken for a man named Rinehart in a number of different scenarios: first, as a lover, then, a hipster, a gambler, a briber, and, finally, as a reverend. He sees that Rinehart has adapted to white society, at the cost of his own identity.He decides to take his grandfather's dying advice to "overcome 'em with yeses, undermine 'em with grins, agree 'em to death and destruction. . ." and "yes" the Brotherhood to death, by making it appear that the Harlem membership is thriving when in reality it is crumbling. However, he soon realizes the cost of this action: Ras becomes a powerful demagogue. After escaping Ras (by throwing a spear Ras had acquired through the leader's jaw, permanently sealing it), the narrator is attacked by a couple of people who trap him inside a coal-filled manhole/basement, sealing him off for the night and leaving him alone to finally confront the demons of his mind: Bledsoe, Norton, and Jack.

At the end of the novel, the narrator is ready to resurface because "overt action" has already taken place. This could be that, in telling us the story, the narrator has already made a political statement where change could occur. Storytelling, then, and the preservation of history of these invisible individuals is what causes political change. 

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Posted: Apr 17, 2012 8:18pm
Apr 10, 2012

http://corbinty.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-1.html

 
http://norton-scientificmedical.com/resources/

Norton Medical and Scientific Research & Biotechnology: Transistors the Size of One Atom Created

BY ADMIN, 6 DAYS AGO
A transistor made up of only one atom has been made, according to a report published this month in Nature Nanotechnology. Physicists have built a working transistor using just one phosphorus atom accurately placed in a silicon crystal.
A group of researchers from Australia, US and South Korea have cooperated in creating a single-atom transistor from a single phosphorus atom in silicon.
According to researchers of Purdue University who already did digital simulations of transistors, this technique that utilizes liquid nitrogen-cooled device can only be possible at very low temperatures of negative 391 F.
It is made possible through manipulating single atoms in a scanning tunneling microscope. In the past, silicon's atomic structure has made it hard to engineer circuits using STMs in an atomic scale. What they used is a combination of etching and STM to make a transistor with an accurate location on a silicon surface.
A transistor is the device that can switch and/or amplify an electronic signal, provided that it is connected to an external circuit by at least 3 terminals. Transistors are made of semiconductor materials and are basically crucial in today's lifestyle for they are part of almost every electronic device we have like mobile phones and computers.
Ordinary transistor dimensions are becoming smaller in time owing to the improvements in nanotechnology and materials used. Reducing the size of transistors is a big deal for every device that depends on the number of transistors in them for their efficiency.
The miniaturization was previously described in 1965 by the co-founder of Intel, Gordon Moore. He observed the trend of transistors at that time and formulated what is known today as Moore's Law. It states that the number of transistors in one chip of a computer will double every two years (18-24 months). However, there is a warning that this cannot go on forever and a limit will eventually be reached when the smallest possible transistor is made, which according to Moore's Law should be around 2020. Apparently, we have reached the limit far too early as it is not possible to reduce a transistor already in the size of a single atom.
And just to make sure the idea of how small we are talking about here sinks in, think one ten-billionth of a meter -- that's 100 picometers, the diameter of 1 (one) phosphorus atom.
Their group has proved that it's possible to put a phosphorus atom in silicon with atomic precision.
The team of developers is hoping that their method of manipulation in an atomic scale can be used as founding blocks for quantum computers or devices that use quantum mechanics to represent digital data. Though even with this breakthrough, there is fair warning that quantum computers might not be possible to build.
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Posted: Apr 10, 2012 11:21pm
Apr 8, 2012

http://www.squidoo.com/norton-donald-roberts-scientific-fraud-and-ddt-malaria-zimbio

 

Norton: Donald Roberts, "Scientific Fraud", and DDT

In this piece Roger Bate, Donald Roberts and Richard Tren accuse the UN of "Scientific Fraud against DDT". Their Accusation is based on an Opinion paper byRoberts and Tren published in Research and Reports in Tropical Medicine. So let's look at their paper and see where the "Scientific Fraud" is.

Roberts and Tren's key argument is that reductions in malaria in the Americas were not the result of Global Environmental Facility interventions but were caused by increased use of antimalarial drugs. In their own words:

"However, their successes were not a result of the interventions we describe as components of the GEF project. Their successes were mostly a result of wide distributions of antimalarial drugs to suppress malaria (see Table 1). Data in the Table reveal trends of increased numbers of antimalarial pills distributed per diagnosed case and decreased numbers of cases. Equally obvious is the decreased numbers of pills distributed per diagnosed case, and increased numbers of cases in two countries (Costa Rica and Panama)."

So their argument rests on table 1. Here's table 1.

Country pills/case pills/case % change in % change in 1990 in 2004 pills/case in cases Mexico 235 2566 1092 -1307 Belize 21 82 390 -287 Costa Rica 653 100 -653 112 El Salvador 34 22802 67064 -8276 Guatemala 38 54 142 -144 Honduras 30 51 170 -338 Nicaragua 279 1319 473 -519 Panama 202 140 -144 1337
The first thing that leaps out at you is that the table shows reductions of more than 100%, which is impossible. Panama cannot have experienced a decrease of 144% in pills/case. According to the two previous columns in the table there was a decrease from 202 to 140, which is a 31% reduction, not 144%. 202/140 is 144%, but it is not the case that the column contains the ratio of pill/case in 1990 divided by pills/case in 2004 (ie, is just labelled wrongly), because then the number for Guatemala would be 70%, not the 142% shown in the table. The column appears to show the bigger number divided by the smaller. That is, all the percent changes in that column are calculated incorrectly and the increases and decrease were calculated differently.
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Posted: Apr 8, 2012 9:10pm
Apr 6, 2012

http://www.zimbio.com/Norton+Scientific+Research+Scam+Fraud+Detection

 Norton Scientific continues growth; expands distribution network into Asia

By isabellealexis15 on January 17, 2012  From nortonscience.livejournal.com
(Thorold) – Norton Scientific is proud to announce the company concluded a deal with Prisma Biotech of Taiwan and has ended its first quarter of the year on a very positive note. Bryan Webb, President of Norton, explains market acceptance of their PAM protein monitoring tool has increased dramatically since its introduction at PITTCON 2011 last month. As a result, the company will accelerate its penetration schedule by now extending its sales distribution network across Asia, as well as...Read Full Story

Read Norton Scientific By Clinton Mccage Wikinut Online Free | News & Politics | YUDU

By stephgreene on January 25, 2012
http://free.yudu.com/item/details/467161/Norton-Scientific-By-Clinton-Mccage---Wikinut By successfully integrating guided wave laser optics, microfluidics and robust data analysis software, researchers at Norton Scientific have invented a proprietary laser-based product that is now being marketed to laboratories and universities around the world. Targeting proteomics applications including crystallographers, the company is introducing this low-cost analytical system to researchers in...Read Full Story

Norton Scientific continues growth; expands distribution network into Asia - Livejournal

By mandymoore on January 18, 2012
(Thorold) – Norton Scientific is proud to announce the company concluded a deal with Prisma Biotech of Taiwan and has ended its first quarter of the year on a very positive note. Bryan Webb, President of Norton, explains market acceptance of their PAM protein monitoring tool has increased dramatically since its introduction at PITTCON 2011 last month. As a result, the company will accelerate its penetration schedule by now extending its sales distribution network across Asia, as well as...Read Full Story

Newsvine - Norton Scientific continues growth; expands distribution network into Asia

By mattevans31 on January 18, 2012
(Thorold) – Norton Scientific is proud to announce the company concluded a deal with Prisma Biotech of Taiwan and has ended its first quarter of the year on a very positive note. Bryan Webb, President of Norton, explains market acceptance of their PAM protein monitoring tool has increased dramatically since its introduction at PITTCON 2011 last month. As a result, the company will accelerate its penetration schedule by now extending its sales distribution network across Asia, as well as...Read Full Story

Norton Scientific By Clinton Mccage - Wikinut | ThisNext

By mikebleach on January 26, 2012
http://www.thisnext.com/item/19F02E82/ED4B8F82/Norton-Scientific-By-Clinton?share=1 By successfully integrating guided wave laser optics, microfluidics and robust data analysis software, researchers at Norton Scientific have invented a proprietary laser-based product that is now being marketed to laboratories and universities around the world. Targeting proteomics applications including crystallographers, the company is introducing this low-cost analytical system to researchers in...Read Full Story
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Posted: Apr 6, 2012 7:37pm
Apr 4, 2012

http://norton-scientificmedical.com/resources/

 

Norton Medical and Scientific Research & Biotechnology: Transistors the Size of One Atom Created
BY ADMIN, 14 DAYS AGO

A transistor made up of only one atom has been made, according to a report published this month in Nature Nanotechnology. Physicists have built a working transistor using just one phosphorus atom accurately placed in a silicon crystal.

A group of researchers from Australia, US and South Korea have cooperated in creating a single-atom transistor from a single phosphorus atom in silicon.

According to researchers of Purdue University who already did digital simulations of transistors, this technique that utilizes liquid nitrogen-cooled device can only be possible at very low temperatures of negative 391 F.

It is made possible through manipulating single atoms in a scanning tunneling microscope. In the past, silicon's atomic structure has made it hard to engineer circuits using STMs in an atomic scale. What they used is a combination of etching and STM to make a transistor with an accurate location on a silicon surface.

A transistor is the device that can switch and/or amplify an electronic signal, provided that it is connected to an external circuit by at least 3 terminals. Transistors are made of semiconductor materials and are basically crucial in today's lifestyle for they are part of almost every electronic device we have like mobile phones and computers.

Ordinary transistor dimensions are becoming smaller in time owing to the improvements in nanotechnology and materials used. Reducing the size of transistors is a big deal for every device that depends on the number of transistors in them for their efficiency.

The miniaturization was previously described in 1965 by the co-founder of Intel, Gordon Moore. He observed the trend of transistors at that time and formulated what is known today as Moore's Law. It states that the number of transistors in one chip of a computer will double every two years (18-24 months). However, there is a warning that this cannot go on forever and a limit will eventually be reached when the smallest possible transistor is made, which according to Moore's Law should be around 2020. Apparently, we have reached the limit far too early as it is not possible to reduce a transistor already in the size of a single atom.

And just to make sure the idea of how small we are talking about here sinks in, think one ten-billionth of a meter -- that's 100 picometers, the diameter of 1 (one) phosphorus atom.

Their group has proved that it's possible to put a phosphorus atom in silicon with atomic precision.

The team of developers is hoping that their method of manipulation in an atomic scale can be used as founding blocks for quantum computers or devices that use quantum mechanics to represent digital data. Though even with this breakthrough, there is fair warning that quantum computers might not be possible to build.

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Posted: Apr 4, 2012 12:56pm

 

 
 
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