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7 Reasons Lululemon Should Make Yoga Pants for People Whose Thighs Touch

7 Reasons Lululemon Should Make Yoga Pants for People Whose Thighs Touch

Lululemon is no stranger to controversy. Not only has the company been under fire for having limited plus-size options, many people are now complaining that the brand’s popular yoga pants are too sheer and pill too easily.

This week former CEO Chip Wilson added insult to his own injury when he appeared on Bloomberg TV Street’s Smart and said the following to explain the yoga pants’ infamous problems:

“Frankly some women’s bodies just don’t actually work for it…it’s really about the rubbing through the thighs, how much pressure there is over a period of time, how much they use it.”

Okay, Chip, we get it. You need a thigh gap to actually wear your yoga pants.

The thing is, when you wear yoga pants and actually do yoga or some other form of exercise, your thighs (and all parts of your body) rub together. Maybe instead of blaming women’s bodies, Wilson should promise customers a better design, especially given the high price tag said sheer yoga pants come with.

To make matters worse, if you’re above a size 12 you can’t even shop at Lululemon. No sheer yoga pants for you!

Well frankly, that’s just bad business.

The average American woman is a size 14-16. In fact, more than half the population in the U.S. wears what is considered a plus-size, yet plus-size clothing only makes up about 9 percent of the $190 billion spent annually on clothes.

What gives?

According to fashion columnist Christian Binkley, fashion brands don’t want to be associated with fat, but the demand is huge:

Young fashion lovers have been demanding at an almost revolutionary pace, they have been screaming, ‘We want fashion, we want short shorts and miniskirts and all the trendy looks,’ and some companies are really finding that they will fly off the shelves if they stock them.

So, will the demand for more plus-size options ever be met?

There is starting to be a track record of success in catering to these curvy women and with this sort of screaming and yelling for the clothing at the same time that there is some initial success I think we are really on the edge of seeing real change in the increase in plus-sizes.

Lululemon withstanding, Binkley is right. We are slowing starting to see a shift in the fashion industry for clothing geared towards plus-size women. Take a look at the 7 examples below for proof that the times they are a-changin’:

1. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour writes of the magazine’s June cover model Kate Upton, “If the high-fashion world seems incapable of figuring out what to do with her … then that’s its loss.” Kate Upton is certainly not considered plus-size, but her curvier body is a nice change from the skeletal models we normally see.

Kate Upton

2. The December issue of Cosmopolitan Australia will feature plus-size model Robyn Lawley’s own line of swimwear, which runs from size 10 to 22.

Robyn Lawley

3. In the UK, retailer Debenhams will now feature size 16 mannequins in all 170 of its British stores.

4. Abercrombie & Fitch, who has come under storm in the past for refusing to carry plus-sizes, has now decided to start catering to a larger customer.

5. This fall New York Fashion Week featured its first-ever plus-size fashion show from Eden Miller’s Cabiria.

Eden Miller

6. Earlier this year, Cynthia Schames launched AbbeyPost, an online marketplace for plus-size clothing.

7. Rent the Runway has launched a plus-size division of their site.

Perhaps it’s time Lululemon jumped on board.

Related from Care2:

You’ll Never Guess What Size Women Are Happiest At

Teenage Girl Celebrating Her Birthday Gets Kicked Out of Store for Being “Too Big”

5 A-List Stars Get Real About Body Image in Hollywood

Why is Hollywood Still Fat Shaming its Superstars?

Read more: , , , , , , ,

Photo Credit: daveynin, Photo Credit: James Chou, Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons, Photo Credit: Fashion News Live

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128 comments

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9:19AM PDT on Apr 4, 2014

hmmmmmmmmmmm.....Chip Wilson sounds like a nob...

2:40PM PST on Nov 12, 2013

Chip Wilson posted a lame a$$ pseudo-apology on YouTube this week, with zero production values and less "give a damn". If he was really sorry, he'd go on Mad Money or another of the CNBC daytime talking heads shows in a $800 suit and "fall on his sword"

2:01PM PST on Nov 12, 2013

thanks

8:17AM PST on Nov 12, 2013

thanks

7:14AM PST on Nov 12, 2013

Lulu lemon isn't the only offender here - finding appropriate work-out gear in anything above a 14 or 16 is a struggle!

6:39AM PST on Nov 12, 2013

Nothing speaks louder than the wallet. If you don't like the store's products, service or attitude, don't shop there.

1:23AM PST on Nov 12, 2013

I mean if u want to pay a ridiculous amount of money for see-through sheer leggings that dont fit well go ahead and do so.. personally my decision would be to simply not go into that shop, there are many others that cater to everybody else's needs and at better prices

clearly this shop is for a certain kind of person, and if you are not that person just dont go shopping there.

12:02AM PST on Nov 12, 2013

Ridiculous... Ladies remind yourself You are The Subject not the object!

8:07PM PST on Nov 11, 2013

thank you for posting it

7:10PM PST on Nov 11, 2013

there are plenty of niche marketeers out there - I didn't actually think Lululemon was aiming at me (I'm way past 40 and not tiny)

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