START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
393,587 people care about Real Food

7 Reasons Why We Have Not ‘Evolved’ To Eat Meat

7 Reasons Why We Have Not ‘Evolved’ To Eat Meat

Robert Grillo, who wrote 5 Reasons Why Meat Eating is Not a Personal Choice, reviewed many of the comments raised by Care2 readers about the story and wrote a follow up intended to address the most common concerns and counter arguments on the subject.

How many times have you heard someone justify their behavior based on the illogical premise that history somehow makes it right and assures its ethical legitimacy into the future? In fact, throughout history influential leaders and thinkers have used this same troubled logic to defend slavery, genocide, the oppression of women, racism, and discrimination based on a whole host of irrelevant criteria including sexual orientation, religion, color and now species.

In my discussions with people both online and in person, I find this interpretation of history and evolution to be one of the most common “apologies” for meat eating I hear these days. I see it as yet another way to avoid honestly confronting the moral issue of using and killing animals for food in an age when it is not necessary. Some actually sympathize with the position of vegans and vegetarians, yet still default to this argument which explains perhaps why 95% of us continue to blindly follow the cultural norms reinforced in us since childhood.

But when we are open to taking a critical look at what we have been taught, the modern myth of man evolving to eat meat can be challenged on several levels. Here are a few of them:

1. We are highly evolved moral beings, averse to violence and suffering

If evolution teaches us anything at all, it teaches us that our moral consciousness and our emotional intelligence are a result of highly developed areas of our brain that afford us these faculties. “… humans are the only animals that can intentionally structure the patterns of our lives according to a basic set of self-aware moral ideals,” writes journalist and professor James McWilliams. “This ability, which is generally premised on reducing unnecessary pain and suffering, happens to be the foundation of human civilization.”

2. Einstein said so

Ironically the idea that man has somehow evolved to eat meat stands in stark contrast to the evolutionary and ethical theory of one of the greatest scientific minds who ever lived, Albert Einstein. Einstein argued that mankind would need to evolve to vegetarianism to essentially save himself and the planet. “¯Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.”

So if the argument from history carries so much weight for most of us, will a mainstream move to vegetarianism as Einstein predicted ever occur? I think so. For one thing, the interpretation of history that meat eaters use to justify meat eating is selectively referenced from those historical sources that support the practice of meat eating, while ignoring the rest. They also go only as far back into history and the origins of hominids to support this position, while once again ignoring our close ancestral relatives who were primarily or entirely herbivores.

3. So-called progressive should think progressively about animals too

Even more ironic still is how otherwise progressive-minded people today continue to support the oppressive forces in our society with their food choices, the same forces that they have adamantly opposed in other areas of their life — in their political leanings, in their religious and spiritual beliefs, in the kind of media and entertainment they seek, in the kind of books and magazines they read, etc. Still the oppression of animals remains unexamined for most progressives, and their food choices perpetuate a deep denial of this oppression, but this too appears to be changing. Victoria Moran, author of Main Street Vegan, recounts of her friendship with Michael Moore who she describes as “anti-vegan”¯ at one point in his life. Now, she reports, he is on the vegan path.

4. Glorifying the history of man’s baser instincts thwarts evolution

Yet even in the face of these exciting new developments, groups like the Weston A. Price Foundation continue to frame history in a vacuum, building their case for meat eating and consequently the more covert goal of promoting the animal products produced by their membership. Other variations on the theme include the ever-popular Paleo diet fan sites where you’ll find a vast ancestral mythology on the rituals of eating animals, referencing allegedly scientific, anthropological and cultural studies to prove it. Upon closer inspection, however, many of these sources are little more than widely held opinions rather than empirical evidence that substantiate the claims about the diets of our ancestors. There is yet much to debate on this subject and few hard and fast facts.

5. By focusing on our potential to do good now, we overcome the oppressive tendencies of our past

All of this talk of what is right for us to eat based on past example distracts us from dealing with the here and now for which we have complete control. No one is arguing that we don’t have a long history of hunting and eating animals. The timelier question is why in an age when meat eating is unnecessary (for the vast majority of the human population) would we want to focus on what our ancestors ate some 10,000 years ago or more? To paraphrase author Colleen Patrick Goudreau, why would we want to base our ethics for eating on our paleontological ancestors whose lives were dictated by a vastly different set of circumstances and for whom we still have many unanswered questions? Certainly there are lessons to learn from history on many levels, but in relating historical facts to present circumstances, context and relevancy is everything.

6. The lessons from history strongly support the opposite

When confronting the argument from history, I say, first, agree with that person wholeheartedly. Then explain how the history and evolution of other social justice movements can instruct us and galvanize us about the future of the vegan/animal rights movement. One common thread that runs through all of these movements is that they were ultimately successful in permeating mainstream culture and society.

They may have begun as fringe movements whose followers were ridiculed and dismissed as extremists, but their leaders ended up being canonized in the history books and described as pioneers who popularized their social movements. And many of these leaders clearly articulated the need for both human and nonhuman animal rights, including Cezar Chavez, Martin Luther King Jr., and Alice Walker. A modern-day case in point is filmmaker and activist James LaVeck who makes a compelling case for how the British anti-slavery movement serves as an example and inspiration for the contemporary animal rights movement in his presentation, Let’s Not Give Up Before We Get Started.

7. Our appetite for justice is far stronger

In the words of Victor Hugo, “There is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come.”¯ It appears that we are standing on the threshold of an era when the tyranny of history is about to be dealt yet another serious blow. As the vegan/animal rights movement continues to gain momentum, mankind’s deplorable and largely unchallenged legacy of treating animals as property, currency, objects and cheap, disposable pieces of meat is coming under greater scrutiny than ever before in our history. This makes the infamous statement, Man Has Evolved to Eat Meat, seem even more hopelessly out of touch and reactionary, revealing an attitude that clings desperately to the past and fears change, even when that change promises to reconnect us with the most fundamental and universal principle of justice and respect for all. And I believe justice will ultimately prevail in the end.

Related Stories:

5 Reasons Why Meat Eating Can’t Be Considered A Personal Choice

Sheep Die Of Thirst At University

Farmers Serving Candy To Their Cows

 

Read more: , , , , , , , ,

Photo Credit: Ravensong75

have you shared this story yet?

some of the best people we know are doing it

841 comments

+ add your own
9:02AM PDT on Sep 17, 2013

Food for thought :)

8:39AM PDT on Apr 27, 2013

"We are highly evolved moral beings, averse to violence and suffering"
"Our appetite for justice is far stronger"

so...what planet or century is the author from?
There are many words I'd use to describe humanity but "just" and "averse to violence and suffering" aren't on the list.

Other than that, the arguments are pretty good, maybe i'm gonna use them the next time somebody tells me it's "natural" to eat (factory farmed) meat.

6:36AM PDT on Mar 20, 2013

No matter what, let's respect life

6:34AM PDT on Mar 20, 2013

No matter what, let's respect life

4:55AM PST on Feb 4, 2013

Agreed Diane L, some feel that only those who follow their viewpoints are civilized while there are others who believe that many options are available, not simply The One And Only Truth For All Of Humankind.

12:54AM PST on Jan 14, 2013

Partha (and no disrespect for shortening your very long first name), but seriously, you said, "It is totally wrong to say that all early humans ate animal flesh"........and you know this just HOW? All experts involved with anthropology agree that early humans ate animal flesh and other animal "products"............they basically ate whatever they could find, scavenge, pick, di up, gather or hunt. You use the words "uncivilized" vs "civilized" to address what cultures ate what products.........saying uncivilized cultures ate human flesh. Who are you to say they weren't civilized? Just when does the word "civilized" enter into it? By all accounts, Mayans were a highly developed and civilized culture, and they were brutal.

Being vegetarian (or not) has nothing to do with being civilized (or not).

7:57PM PST on Jan 13, 2013

It is totally wrong to say that all early humans ate animal flesh. There were both civilized and uncivilized humans from times immemorial. Many among the civilized people refrained from eating meat, fish, or egg and consumed only plant-based or milk-based foods. On the other hand, among uncivilized humans, there were cannibals who even ate human flesh. The basic human behaviour is very difficult to change. However, it is very much true that moving from non-vegetarianism to vegetarianism is a clear sign of advancement or progress of mankind, and the reverse is clear sign of animalistic behaviour of humans.

11:29PM PST on Dec 2, 2012

Dale, here's the link to the movie, Gladiator...........

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0172495/

................you can also watch it in it's entirety online.

11:21PM PST on Dec 2, 2012

Dale, Joaquin Phoenix was the brother of River Phoenix, who died of a drug overdose at an L.A. nightclub owned by Johnny Depp. Joaquin was as involved with drugs as his brother back then, and maybe he has stopped "using", but the point is he is nobody that I'd want to emulate as a role model. He played the Roman emporer in the movie, "Gladiator" starring Russell Crowe. He became "Caesar" by choking his own father to death. I think maybe the actor is a bit like the characters he plays, since he seems to be a natural for playing BAD people. Narrating a documentary about animal abuse doesn't mean the narrator is a nice person. Dale, that movie won the Academy Award a few years back and is shown on TV in re-runs often. I'm surprised you haven't seen it. His character intimidated his subjects, including his own sister, whom he secretly loved and he even tried to force himself on her sexually by involving her small son, and then after he had Crowe's character in chains, he stabbed him in the gut with a small knife, causing him to "bleed out" before engaging him in the "gladiator" arena, but Crowe's character still managed to kill HIM. Cowards rarely succeed in the end.

5:08AM PST on Dec 2, 2012

Diane L, no...didn't see Nightline. Haven't heard of Joaquin Phoenix or seen Gladiators since I sometimes don't see some of the expansive American culture or know some American references as I live outside that country. Lovely Wikipedia just gave me the information since I don't have Mr. Spock's computer banks at my finger tips.

No, Nightline's item on the KKK was not viewed by moi, amazing that these neanderthal knuckle draggers still exist in the modern world. But then hate and prejudice always smolders/ignites and even if the globe becomes one colour there will be those who will spread hate against anyone with green eyes if they have blue eyes or as one Star Trek episode illustrated--two men from the same planet were black on one side and white on the other. They killed each other off by hate because one group were black on the right side and the other black on the left side, with only two men remaining alive. They killed each other, inspired by hate. Some vegans may be KKK and also some omnivores. Twits exist no matter what.

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

ads keep care2 free

Recent Comments from Causes

Gerald, Missed the point again. No surprise there. Do you even KNOW the difference between death…

Some politicians are just unfit for political office. They and their adherents are detrimental to the…

I adore learning about history-thank you for re-running this article as I missed it the first time.

meet our writers

Kristina Chew Kristina Chew teaches ancient Greek, Latin and Classics at Saint Peter's University in New Jersey.... more
Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!

more from causes




Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.