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AP Test Records Show That We’re Failing Female Students

AP Test Records Show That We’re Failing Female Students

Written by Bryce Covert

In Mississippi and Montana, no female students took the Advanced Placement (AP) test in computer science last year. In 47 other states where girls did take the test, they made up less than a third of the test takers, and in Utah they were as low as 4 percent of all test takers. (No students took the test at all in Wyoming.) Out of the 30,000 students who took the test last year, less than 20 percent were girls.

People of color had even lower representation among test takers. Not a single African-American student took the test in 11 states, no Hispanic student took it in eight, and they made up 3 percent and 8 percent of all test takers, respectively. The highest proportion both groups reached were 10 percent for black students in Maryland and 18 percent for Hispanic students in Texas.

Girls and students of color also have lower pass rates on the test than white boys, and black students have the lowest rate of all.

These groups still struggle to be represented in science, technology, engineering and math jobs, or the STEM field, despite a need for more of these workers and the high pay that they can expect. Women hold just a quarter of these jobs and progress in growing that number has petered out since 1990. Worse, their share of computer jobs has fallen since then. Black workers hold just 6 percent of STEM jobs despite making up 11 percent of the overall workforce, while Hispanics hold 7 percent of the jobs yet are 15 percent of the workforce. White workers hold 71 percent of these jobs.

But if these students aren’t being encouraged or guided into these fields at a young age, that may be part of the reason they hold so few of these jobs. The AP prep course for computer science has students design and create computer programs, hands-on experience that could spark an interest in the field. The new president of the College Board, which oversees the AP exams, has said he is focused on expanding access to underserved groups of students and especially on closing the racial test-taking gap.

Even when women and people of color do manage to make it into these fields, however, they can still expect to be paid less than white men. Women who work in STEM jobs make $75,100 on average, while men make $91,000. Blacks make $75,000 and Hispanics make $77,300, compared to $88,400 for white workers.

This post was originally published in ThinkProgress

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Photo Credit: Thinkstock

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9:21PM PST on Jan 24, 2014

Thanks

1:16AM PST on Jan 24, 2014

thanks

11:33PM PST on Jan 20, 2014

The university student-population is over 50% female and women are severely under-represented in those fields? This implies that there are a lot of fields in which men are severely under-represented. This looks less like an institutional failure and more like a difference of subculture, and preferences, between males and females.

There is another side to this as well: Women tend to dominate astronomy-departments and (though I don't have confirmation on this) information-science. These overlap heavily with physics and computer-science. I don't think the departments are even nearly as big, but there is more headway in evening things out than there may appear.

3:26AM PST on Jan 20, 2014

thank you

10:19PM PST on Jan 19, 2014

Not everyone is interested in those subjects, even though they are important.

8:52PM PST on Jan 19, 2014

To get girls to take the AP test, they need to have done the class work or independent study in computer programming. For that to happen, they need to have it "marketed" to them, a bit. To understand, for instance, how powerful even a short program can be, such as a factor calculator. (Wrote it for my C++ class, used it for my number theory class.)

3:48PM PST on Jan 19, 2014

I think it's time to get rid of standardized testing, if it's sexies then that's just another good reason to do so.

3:19PM PST on Jan 19, 2014

ty

11:44AM PST on Jan 19, 2014

Lift women up, don't keep them down

7:18AM PST on Jan 19, 2014

Too many backward steps are being forced upon women.

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Kristina Chew Kristina Chew teaches ancient Greek, Latin and Classics at Saint Peter's University in New Jersey.... more
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