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Bullied Teen Girl Gets 40K Worth of Plastic Surgery

Bullied Teen Girl Gets 40K Worth of Plastic Surgery

‘You have the biggest ears I’ve ever seen!’

“Dumbo!”

“Elephant ears!”

Such were taunts Nadia Ilse faced from classmates at school starting as early as first grade. Bullied for years because of her physical appearance, Nadia began asking her mother for plastic surgery to get her ears pinned back at just 10-years-old.

Now at 14-years-old Nadia has undergone $40,000 worth of plastic surgery to do just that and also alter her chin and nose to match.

The Little Baby Face Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides free corrective surgery for children born with facial deformities, provided Nadia with an all-expense paid trip to New York for her plastic surgeries. Although she only wanted to get her ears pinned back, her doctor recommended that she also have her chin and nose done to balance out her features.

Nadia says that she feels better about herself now and hopes that the bullying will stop when she gets back to school.

“I’m going to be nervous at first, but I think I can pull it through and that they will realize what they have done and they will stop,” says Nadia about returning to school.

Will Nadia’s new look stop her tormentors? That’s a hard question to answer and one that the young girl will face head-on come fall. And what did the bullies learn from Nadia’s plastic surgery? That their taunts and name calling could have the power to convince someone to go under the knife and change their appearance. Is that something we want to teach children?

What about Nadia herself? Will all the plastic surgery erase seven years of bullying?

While her new look might have given her a new boost of confidence, Nadia’s self-esteem has been scattered throughout the years by her bullies. Her external make-over, does not fix the internal damage that has been done.

I also have to say that focusing on her external beauty sends a very negative message to Nadia and reinforces notions that women and girls are valued based on their physical appearance rather than what they think or do. Women and girls need to learn to build their self-esteem based on their talents and skills, not what they look like.

What do you think? Do you think Nadia’s plastic surgery will help her self-esteem in the long run?

 

Related from Care2:

12-Year-Old Girl With Cancer Creates YouTube Make-Up Tutorials (Video)

Teen Girl Wins Google Science Fair For Breast Cancer Computer Program

Ontario Passes Anti-Bullying Bill

 

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Photo credit: Photo by madelineyoki used under a Creative Commons license.

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3:09AM PST on Dec 20, 2013

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1:59PM PDT on Jul 3, 2013

No matter how much money you spend, how much insurance will cover or how much you are hurting to have something changed on your body, something will come back around to make you feel despondent about. Things never change.

8:00AM PDT on Jul 2, 2013

Skippy M. said " Did I mention that I live in Canada and tht it was all covered by the government.medical plan?"

You damned Canadians and your sensible and effective health plan and medical coverage!

6:15AM PDT on Jul 2, 2013

I live in Canada. My son was born with deformed ears. One bent forward and the other bent
down (towards the ground.) We let his hair grow over the ears until he was 5, when he had his plastic surgery. He had a second reconstructive
surgery when he was 10 and now he
has perfect ears. Did I mention that I live in Canada and tht it was all covered by the government.medical plan? It probably didn't cost $40 million either.

11:34PM PDT on Jun 28, 2013

of course that's sending the wrong message! people don't like how you look so we'll pay for you to change it even though you're not yet fully-developed and may grow up weird-looking when her real adult face outgrows the plastic surgery? great message. ear-pinning is one thing, a very very common procedure among children and adults, that pretty much stays the same throughout their lives. but yes, what about plenty of other children with deformities or dental problems their parents can't afford to fix/improve? what about their self-esteem, self-acceptance, and self-worth? how about putting more money into education than paying for normal kids to get cosmetic surgery because of bullying?!

5:46AM PDT on Jun 28, 2013

What about all the other kids, with crooked teeth, crossed eyes, birth marks, etc whos parents don't have 40K? Too bad for them, they just have to deal with it?

There was an article recently about a bullied teen girl, with long pretty hair, unblemished oval face and a bright smile with no crooked teeth, and eyes without thick glasses.

In other words, A PERFECTLY FINE GIRL. She COMMITED SUICIDE because of the bullying.

For what good reason, was she so "defective" that she felt she had to die, to relieve the world of her horrible presence, while the truely horrible bullies still live?

I on the other hand DID, have a "lazy" eye, crooked teeth, bad eye sight, thick glasses, dyslexia, discalculia, extreme introversion (obviously, if no one accepts you, you stay alone alot, and stay away from people who would ostrocize you, or harm you) and I'm still alive, in my adult life, among other non perfect adults. I met a student once, with half her face a big purple birthmark. She was a soft spoken sweet person. When are we going to teach our kids, that looks really mean nothing?

Look inside the lives of those skinny models. Are they REALLY happy, obsessing over their looks and weight all the time?

Think about animals, is the black cat, 3 legged cat, cat with a torn ear, any better or worse than the pure white, fluffy persian? Short answer is no. Also, it's very strange how people gravitate to imperfect animals, like $30.000 was raised to buy a security camera for th

11:46PM PDT on Jun 24, 2013

good for her

5:40AM PDT on Jun 24, 2013

@sylvie everybody is free of doing what ze wants with hir body. And plastic surgery is important for those who was scarred by incidents!

5:35AM PDT on Jun 24, 2013

I can't judge, because she's the only that can decide about herself but personally I never would that. I just decided that I. DON'T. CARE. ABOUT. OTHER. PEOPLE. PROBLEMS. ABOUT. MY. LOOK. and they can kiss my hairy legs or my clean but not acceptable for societies standard face. I'm really sad that they made her to do this because no one deserves to hear that they aren't good enough. And the worst thing is that physical appearance is NOTHING.
If we want to help we should just change society. And guess what? WE ARE SOCIETY. So WE SHOULD CHANGE.
I stopped judging people gradually when I was maybe 12 years before I realized it was useless and it hurt others. You can also stop using "you look nice" as compliment because it isn't, sincere or not. You're not believing in it anyway, because you switch on tv and there are perfect thin girls (???? for who? Beauty is soggettive) made of plastic or you go on a bus and some idiots say "I don't sit near her because she's ugly" (this happened to me).
Where are true values? We drank them with a slimming herbal tea or we put them as wrinkle cream?

3:54AM PDT on Jun 22, 2013

Tout le monde, et surtout les jeunes filles, devraient bannir la chirurgie esthétique. Cette pratique n'a véritablement aucun sens.

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