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Coke Project Helps Urban Farms Harvest Rainwater

Coke Project Helps Urban Farms Harvest Rainwater

In celebration of Earth Week, Coca-Cola teamed up with Detroit-based non-profit Urban Farming to launch a rainwater harvesting project at local community gardens.

The project uses repurposed Coca-Cola syrup barrels to conserve water and create a sustainable water supply for vegetation in the Urban Farming gardens; thus helping to provide free, fresh produce to the community.

The recycled rainwater harvesting systems will be placed in nine community gardens located throughout Detroit. With help and materials from Home Depot, garden structures called “pergolas” will be constructed within each garden and equipped with a rain barrel, solar panel and pump system.

The rain barrel will capture rainwater from the roof of the pergolas, store and filter the water into the pump. The solar pump is connected to a drip irrigation system which when activated will water the plant life in the garden.

“This Earth Day project highlights the need to learn about the new green technologies that are necessary to preserve our planet and expose our community members to green businesses and green collar job opportunities in the emerging Green Economy,” said Taja Sevelle, founder and executive director of Urban Farming.

To date, Urban Farming and its partners have planted and facilitated over 24,000 community and residential gardens across the country and abroad; 1,200 of them in Detroit and surrounding areas.

Related Reading:

Easy Ways To Conserve Water and Save Money
The Heartland In Compton? Urban City Hides Farming Community
From Small Seeds, Urban Farms Grow

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Image Credit: Flickr – madmack66

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91 comments

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6:41PM PDT on Jul 1, 2011

good move

6:04AM PDT on May 23, 2011

thanks, it helps

5:20AM PDT on May 9, 2011

"greenwash"... had never heard that term before. But it is sad that so many people buy it. Yes, this rain water collecting was a great idea. Now if only Coca Cola would stop destroying the rest of the world where they are involved...

11:41PM PDT on May 4, 2011

Great idea hope other companies take up this, it uses something that would otherwise be dumped and turns it into something useful, thanks Coca-Cola

12:11AM PDT on May 1, 2011

Weird, Coke trying to help. I don't buy it. All those big industries aren't caring, helpful people. They're greedy. But it's nice to hear they're doing something right.

11:54PM PDT on Apr 27, 2011

THANKS 2 INFORM

3:42AM PDT on Apr 27, 2011

Greenwash or not--rain barrels are constructive regardless of what (hopefully not too toxic) they were before.

10:38AM PDT on Apr 26, 2011

If there are filters, what about harvesting it for drinking water too? I have been thinking of this since i saw how some people in the southwest divert their rainwater into a storage tank.

7:52AM PDT on Apr 26, 2011

I saw this headline & was going to pass it by, but thought it was important to remind C2C readers that this was greenwash.

So, coming to the comments section and seeing how many have already written with that idea in mind?
It's wonderful to know that Coca-Cola's business model has had the curtains pulled back on it to a a point where now EVERYONE knows what villians they are! KUDOS TO THE READERS!!

2:41AM PDT on Apr 26, 2011

What a 'greenwash'. This company has no morals about polluting in South America and stealing water in India.

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