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Fracking in California?

  • by
  • April 10, 2012
  • 11:00 am
Fracking in California?

 

Fracking has been in the news a lot lately. From earthquakes in Ohio to flammable water and possibly even pastel-colored animals, fracking has taken our nation (especially the East Coast) by storm as its problems become more and more evident. Recently, however, the West Coast was rocked by a fracking scandal, when the Environmental Working Group came out with a damning report bringing together years of research to conclude that serious fracking has taken place in at least six California counties: Kern, Los Angeles, Monterey, Sacramento, Santa Barbara and Ventura.

Since California lies along the San Adreas Fault and has a history of earthquakes, the idea of fracking here is scary. As a California resident, I have always known about the possibility of earthquakes. In elementary school, we had drills two or three times a year, squishing under our desks or fidgeting in the hot sun outside as we waited for the all-clear bell. By fourth grade, everyone could define “San Andreas,” and we all knew what to do during an earthquake: crouch under a desk or table, stay away from windows and shelves, clasp your hands over your neck; if you’re outside, find the lowest spot you can away from trees, buildings or electrical poles.

When small quakes struck, we prided ourselves in telling our parents, many of whom had grown up somewhere else, what to do, and we retold the stories of our good safety habits for days afterward. Everyone who’s grown up in California knows about earthquakes and understands their dangers.

Although there have been no major quakes to test our skills since the San Francisco earthquake in 1989, experts have been predicting the next “big one” for years, citing stress buildup in the San Andreas and warning residents to prepare. Considering this, the prospect of fracking in California seems very misguided. While there have been no ill effects so far, a welcome sign, we know very little about what methods or chemicals are being used or how they may change in the future, and what impacts they could be having.

The reason we know so little, as AlterNet reports, is that California’s government, instead of taking action on fracking, is simply ignoring the problem. A Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR) spokesperson said that his organization “doesn’t have regulations” for fracking or any information about it, either in the San Joaquin-Sacramento delta area or offshore near Long Beach and Santa Barbara. Since I live near those areas (and in a house built in the 1930s), the idea that my elected officials are ignoring fracking upsets me, especially since I hadn’t thought I needed to worry — California governor Jerry Brown has a great environmental record. Then again, considering President Obama’s fracking policies, perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that even an environmentalist Democrat has fallen under fracking’s spell.

Last but not least among the concerns is something which will have a unique effect on my region: the water required for fracking. Southern California is a natural desert, and our tap water is either groundwater or imported — from the Colorado River, northern California, and Owens Valley — at a steep price for taxpayers ($49 million in 2010 for just one aqueduct, and expected to rise 80% over the next decade) and the environment (the Colorado, for example, has been tapped so much that it no longer even makes it to the ocean).

Conservation is a big part of our lives here, emphasized even more heavily than earthquake safety in schools, and stringent measures have been put into place to reduce water use, such as toilet to tap programs and restrictions on watering. The idea that all the water my family and I have carefully saved has been given to an industry that wastes thousands (or millions) of gallons on a single well horrifies and annoys me. What’s the point in trying to conserve if it’s just going to be given to the drilling companies?

Even if you’re not a California resident, this discovery should still concern you. Luckily, some people are taking action to stop fracking in California. The Center for Biological Diversity and Sierra Club are suing the Bureau of Land Management to prevent it from fracking on “environmentally sensitive” federal lands.

 

Related Stories:

Frackers Win With Obama’s New Greenhouse Gas Rule

Bill Makes it Harder to Fight Fracking

How New York State Residents Can Protect Themselves From Fracking

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25 comments

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2:21AM PDT on Jun 21, 2013

We need to put in end to fracking. It is NOT good for us.

8:14PM PDT on Apr 25, 2012

I totally misread the question and clicked on Yes when I voted. So! Please disregard one of those "yes" votes. I apologize for that.

9:55AM PDT on Apr 24, 2012

I am shocked to learn that fracking is going on here in the Sacramento area. We literally have "water police" here to patrol neighborhoods looking for wrongful water usage. Yet, what I save by not letting the water run while I brush my teeth is being mixed with chemicals and BLOWN underground. How can I find out more details about this local atrocity? I am ready to MARCH!!!

3:45PM PDT on Apr 17, 2012

No ban fracking on all the earth. Unless the water can remain safe I will go without natural gas -- and I will have water!
Please check this out-- and find out who is storing water and buying water sources? Please.

SO -- RICH OR POOR -- STORE THE REVERSE OSMOSIS, CHARCOAL (ACTIVATED), WATER FILTERS, SOLAR DISTILLERS TO HAVE DISTILLED WATER, AND STORE WATER.
Fracking equals less clean water. Water is more valuable then natural gas -- if you think about it. The natural gas you can live without until they find a way to get it without hurting the earth. WATER IS WHAT THE RICH PEOPLE ARE STORING -- WHILE ENCOURAING THE USE OF NATURAL GAS.
SO -- RICH to POOR -- STORE THE REVERSE OSMOSIS, CHARCOAL (ACTIVATED), WATER FILTERS, SOLAR DISTILLERS TO HAVE DISTILLED WATER, AND
please STORE WATER.

11:08PM PDT on Apr 12, 2012

They are destroying everything from the mountain tops to the underground water supplies, our forests, our wildlife, all of the great waters on the earth from lakes to rivers to oceans, and everything in between. They are causing horrible suffering and dangerous products with factory animal farming, contaminating our fruits and vegetable with pesticides and GMO seeds. They are destroying everything that is beautiful, and healthy, and in the process are killing our planet and killing us. All in the name of greed, it is disgusting and extremely depressing. Instead of wasting precious lives and gazillions of dollars waging questionable wars in foreign lands, we need to be waging civil war against these mega corporate criminal companies who are destroyers of our earth, our government and our lives.

10:49PM PDT on Apr 12, 2012

Fracking should be banned everywhere in the United States and also everywhere in the world.

11:01AM PDT on Apr 11, 2012

Actually, there has been a major quake since 1989. The Northridge quake in 1994 woke me up in my hotel room in Las Vegas.

10:32AM PDT on Apr 11, 2012

Gloria P., I'm with you. Obviously this practice was started without the least idea of the consequences. But my feelings are that it is time to stop treating this planet as if it is not fragile and easily destroyed.
I do live in California. I was born and raised in San Francisco so I have experienced my share of earthquakes. But I wouldn't live anywhere else. Even after crossing this country twice I still think this is the most beautiful and diverse state. And I would rather take my chances on earthquakes than experience tornadoes and hurricanes.
Fracking must be stopped, not only in California, but everywhere. If we don't know what we're doing we shouldn't do it.

Just a bit of nit-picking, the Colorado River never did run into the ocean, it runs into the Gulf of Mexico.

9:12AM PDT on Apr 11, 2012

Bringing a method of oil extraction that most likely causes earthquakes to an area that already has eathquakes might not be one of the wisest of decisions.

8:39AM PDT on Apr 11, 2012

I currently live in Southern California (God, let me out soon!). My area is surrounded by earthquake faults. We had a hefty quake here a couple years ago and are still having aftershocks. The idea of fracking in an area like this, or anywhere else, is as intelligent as juggling nitroglycerin. Sooner or later something is going to go BOOM!

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