Got a Case of the Mondays? A New Study Suggests You Don’t

The good news: it looks like Mondays are not necessarily more depressing than some other days of the week. The bad news: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday produce many of the same moods and psychological effects as Monday for people in the usual week-long work environment. In a new study published in the Journal of Positive Psychology, researchers found that moods were generally about the same for these four days of the week.

Not surprisingly, people’s moods improved noticeably on Fridays and many respondents felt less stressed on Saturdays and Sundays. Researchers concluded that the idea of a terrible Monday is not accurate and should be ditched after they polled 340,000 respondents about their moods throughout the week.

The study’s abstract points out that previous studies which found evidence for such phenomena as ‘Blue Monday’ (the last Monday in January, often considered the most depressing day of the year) have only been established based on small student samples:

Support has been found for ‘Blue Monday’, ‘Thank God it’s Friday’ and Weekdays versus Weekend effects, although in relatively small studies and often with student samples.

The study also found that weekday mood changes were less noticeable in retired respondents and that gender was not a factor in the way respondents discussed their moods for different days of the week. The results of the study hint at the possibility that workers are slightly unhappy for the vast majority of the work week. The head of the research team, Arthur Stone at Stony Brook University, claims that the contrast between the relaxed feeling of Sunday and the shift to weekday worry has led to unfair dislike of Monday.

That connection seems to suggest that Mondays are as bad as they seem, along with Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Unfortunately, this type of study will not produce stable results. Last year, studies suggested that people were particularly unhappy and stern on Monday mornings. Earlier studies suggested people were down on Sundays.

So next time you feel like complaining about Monday, just think that Tuesday will quickly follow on its heels.

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Photo Credit: Larsinio

22 comments

Ori M.
oriana M.3 years ago

I always find Fridays and Mondays the worst. Both are the most tiring - late night on Sunday and exhausted from early mornings all week on Friday. :)

Saturday is the best day of the week.

Irene Valdes
Irene Valdes3 years ago

Seems that the study reflects other more than "which day is emotionally depressing", but that there is something in the system that makes us believe that there should be a study like that!
Trying to analyze the days of the week leveled up to everyone speaks of a system that does not takes reality into account. Everyone is different and we all need different things in different moments; also there is a difference in mood depending cycles and depending on the seasons.
Maybe there should be a study about the evolution in depression tendency and how it is being considered normal and as a part of life.
Or a study about how are we building our approach to lifestyles, workstyles, etc and the consecuences, one of the consecuences could be depression.
How about why none is taking seriously GNH? (gross national happiness)?
Why none thinks it is important the quantity of medication people use just for getting along on a day to day basis?

Jessica Larsen
Janne O.3 years ago

"The good news: it looks like Mondays are not necessarily more depressing than some other days of the week. The bad news: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday produce many of the same moods and psychological effects as Monday for people in the usual week-long work environment. In a new study published in the Journal of Positive Psychology, researchers found that moods were generally about the same for these four days of the week.

Not surprisingly, people’s moods improved noticeably on Fridays and many respondents felt less stressed on Saturdays and Sundays."
And they needed to make a study to come up with what is self-evident to the majority?

"Earlier studies suggested people were down on Sundays"
Of course. We all know awaits once you go to sleep Sunday night! Most people aren't fortunate enough to have a job they thrive with.

jasna gonda
jasna gonda3 years ago

I agree with Cheri H. What a theme for a study!

JT SMITH
JT SMITH3 years ago

I think what you'll really find is the problem with Mondays is that, since most people work 5 days/week and have Saturdays and Sundays off, they have some trouble getting back into the rhythm of the work week after having those two days off. Kind of like when you have that little bit of difficulty getting back into the rhythm after lunch break. That was the case for me, at least.

Right now, Mondays are my only days off from work. Which means that end up typically using it as a coma day (i.e. in bed in a state that's so close to being comatose as makes no odds). Though having Mondays off does come in handy for things like getting work done on my car.

JT SMITH
JT SMITH3 years ago

I think what you'll really find is the problem with Mondays is that, since most people work 5 days/week and have Saturdays and Sundays off, they have some trouble getting back into the rhythm of the work week after having those two days off. Kind of like when you have that little bit of difficulty getting back into the rhythm after lunch break. That was the case for me, at least.

Right now, Mondays are my only days off from work. Which means that end up typically using it as a coma day (i.e. in bed in a state that's so close to being comatose as makes no odds). Though having Mondays off does come in handy for things like getting work done on my car.

Ronald E.
Ronald E.3 years ago

Just accept the fact that EVERY day is going to be a bad day with the likes of Ryan, Cantor, Bachmann, and so many more of these losers in DC.

Nicole Weber
Nicole W.3 years ago

noted

Kamryn M.
Kay M.3 years ago

what's nasty is waking up thinking you're closer to the weekend than you are (you think it's Thursday, but turns out it's only Wednesday).

Kamryn M.
Kay M.3 years ago

what's nasty is waking up thinking you're closer to the weekend than you are (you think it's Thursday, but turns out it's only Wednesday).