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Green Roofs on Chicken Coops to Highrises

Green Roofs on Chicken Coops to Highrises

With 3 acres of green roofs under his belt, Jason King of TERRA.fluxus has plied his trade from California to Washington, in a wide range of environments. Listen in as we discuss everything from the more common than you’d think practice of using chicken coops for testing grounds for avante garde green architecture, to the fact that NYC gets more rain than supposedly rainy Portland, Oregon. Keep an ear out for some interesting perspectives on sustainability, what it means, could mean, and how we could do better.

Hopefully this conversation will, um, plant some seeds in your mind of what you could do in your community, or on your business

I noticed on his blog that he had some DIY resources for green roofing, so I asked for you if he had sites to recommend for you to explore. He had three! 

PS You can now subscribe to the GreenSmith Sessions podcast series in iTunes, and download specific episodes here.

If you have any questions for him, or examples of landscape architecture (or vegitecture as he likes to call it) we would all benefit from knowing about, please feel free to share below. I’ll make sure he knows about your questions, seeing as I can lean over and tell him!

Greensmith Sessions: Green Roofs on Chicken Coops to Highrises with Jason King of TERRA.fluxus (click to listen)

Originally published on GreensmithConsulting.com and republished here with permission.

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Photo credit: via Flickr by earthrangers

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47 comments

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2:06PM PDT on Jun 14, 2014

Mary H
Please see WaterGripMedia.com. You can grow vegetables on a slanted roof.

4:59AM PDT on Jul 8, 2011

Thank you for sharing

4:30PM PST on Feb 16, 2011

Great ideas thanks

7:48PM PST on Feb 13, 2011

Thanks for the article.

7:24PM PST on Feb 13, 2011

Some one asks why are things that are good for us and Earth so costly. Because people need to make a living, and when they are paid fairly for their contributions and they make the extra effort to treat animals humainly it takes more time.Our culture has grown used to the idea of low prices for things because they don't understand that the working poor are barely surviving on what they're paid.Small farmers usually need outside income just to be able to keep farming.This is why we need a strong social safety net.Some still perpetuate the myth that poor people aren't working, and some aren't because of lack of available jobs, but mostly it's propaganda put out by those who don't want to contribute thru taxes.As people get paid more and the quality of life goes up for food animals,and food improves in it's health value, it will also cost more. You are paying for life force that is valued, not just exploited for profit.

4:51AM PST on Feb 13, 2011

love it

12:13AM PST on Feb 13, 2011

Thanks for the article.

3:58PM PST on Feb 12, 2011

Great.

2:54PM PST on Feb 12, 2011

great ideas.

9:00AM PST on Feb 12, 2011

My husband is an avid gardener and uses almost all the area our lot has to offer, replanting each time a bed has finished producing with vegetables and flowers. Maybe you can't eat most flowers, but they are certainly food for the eyes. Unfortunately all our roofs are slanted, so green roof gardening is not an option, but what a wonderful idea!

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