START A PETITION 27,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
582,676 people care about Real Food

How Many Calories Do You See in This Pizza?

  • by
  • September 23, 2012
  • 10:00 am
How Many Calories Do You See in This Pizza?
  • 1 of 2

Last week, McDonald’s announced that it would begin posting calorie counts on the menu boards at its more than 14,000 locations in the U.S. “At McDonald’s, we recognize customers want to know more about the nutrition content of the food and beverages they order,” said McDonald’s USA President Jan Fields. “As a company that has provided nutrition information for more than 30 years, we are pleased to add to the ways we make nutrition information available to our customers and employees.”

In 2010, under the Affordable Care Act, menu labeling regulations became law, requiring restaurants and similar retail food establishments to post calorie counts adjacent to the items on menus and menu boards. In other words, McDonald’s would have had to do it one way or the other. “Several health advocates slammed McDonald’s Corp., accusing it of disingenuously spinning an inevitable requirement as if it were a voluntary decision,” the Los Angeles Times reported. Yet McDonald’s, at least, is complying with the law as originally passed, and doing so ahead of schedule.

Pizza Chains, Supermarkets and Convenience Stores Don’t Want to Post Calories
Many others will not go willingly. Pizza chains, supermarkets and convenience stores are lobbying for exemptions and modifications to the regulations on the grounds that they are “unreasonable or unnecessarily burdensome.” The law might make sense for restaurants, but not for them, they say.

Supermarkets, for example, could be on the line for posting calorie counts for thousands of items, from sushi assembled in-house to macaroni salad from the deli. Likewise for convenience stores, only on a smaller scale. And with “34 million ways to top a pizza,” pizza chains want alternatives that “would work for pizza.” These businesses make some legitimate points. But just because it would be hard for them — and really only at first — doesn’t mean that they get to be exempted from the law.

Next: The Common Sense Nutrition Disclosure Act of 2012

  • 1 of 2

Read more: , , , , , , , ,

Photo 1 from Thinkstock, Photo 2 from King Chung Huang via flickr

quick poll

vote now!

Loading poll...

have you shared this story yet?

some of the best people we know are doing it

81 comments

+ add your own
8:42AM PDT on Oct 18, 2012

a lot. that's the answer. its junk food. to be rarely treated to. not an everyday menu item. facepalm

7:55AM PDT on Oct 14, 2012

it doesn't matter. even if mcdonalds posted all their nasty ingredients on the menu people would still eat it. America is a sad place.

11:54PM PDT on Oct 13, 2012

You know, I think it's nuts. Stuff like pizza is a TREAT. You already know it's not the healthiest choice, so that's why you don't gorge on pizza everyday.

I love my veggie pizzas, loaded with bell peppers, mushrooms, a little onion, and seasoned tomatoes on top of that sauce, cheese, and virgin crust. YUM

12:44PM PDT on Sep 28, 2012

I LOVE pizza!! Live a little every once in a while and enjoy a slice or two.

11:56AM PDT on Sep 28, 2012

Thanks

10:49AM PDT on Sep 28, 2012

TY

6:51AM PDT on Sep 28, 2012

I agree that people have a right to the information that would enable them to make healthier decisions regarding diet and that calorie count is part of that. But I think that knowing what is real food and what is actually good to eat is more important. It boggles my mind to see people eating chocolate chip shaped cereal for breakfast and somehow still expecting to make it through the day let alone life in general.

7:31PM PDT on Sep 27, 2012

When I want a pizza I don't care how many calories are in it ...

2:49PM PDT on Sep 27, 2012

Interesting. Thanks.

10:35AM PDT on Sep 27, 2012

all nutritional information should be posted.

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

Care2 - Be Extraordinary - Start a Care2 Petition
ads keep care2 free
CONTACT THE EDITORS

Recent Comments from Causes

Happy for these adorable rabbits. There's no reason to do live animal testing. "U.S. National Institutes…

Thank you very much for sharing! Such rescues with happy ending make my day! Blessings to the Mino Valley…

ads keep care2 free

more from causes




Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.