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Morning-After Pill Is Not an “Abortive Pill”

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But starting in 2002, studies offered evidence that morning-after pills do not block implantation. Indeed, some organizations, when confronted with the New York Times‘s findings, changed their information to reflect these:

After The Times asked about this issue, A.D.A.M., the firm that writes medical entries for the National Institutes of Health Web sitedeleted passages suggesting emergency contraceptives could disrupt implantation. The New York Times, which uses A.D.A.M.’s content on its health Web page, updated its site. At the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Roger W. Harms, the Web site’s medical editor in chief, said “we are chomping at the bit” to revise the entryif the Food and Drug Administration changes labels or other agencies make official pronouncements.

Despite more and more scientific studies in the past decade, abortion opponents have continued to resist changing the labels. For instance, Dr. Harrison told the New York Times that while the Plan B studies were “led by ‘a good researcher,’ … …  she would prefer a study with more women and more documentation of when in their cycles they took Plan B.”

High Political Stakes Over How the Morning-After Pill Works

As the New York Times underscores, the stakes about the information on the morning-after pill’s label — on whether or not the “implantation idea” is specifically noted — are high. Controversies about contraceptions and about emergency contraception have become a factor in the debate about President Obama’s health care law and, indeed, about the presidential race.

A number of religious groups and abortion opponents are fighting the law on the grounds that it would require insurers to cover contraceptives for employees of Roman Catholic schools and other institutions which are officially opposed to birth control. Supporters of “personhood” initiatives who define fertilized eggs as people say that their proposals will ban the emergency contraceptives if they do prevent implantation.

The FDA and government agencies need to act quickly and efficiently to revise the labels of the morning-after pill to reflect the latest scientific evidence about the drugs not preventing implantation. Abortion foes are already criticizing scientists and government agencies for letting ideology seep into their decisions. The FDA and scientists need to take control of the conversation and make it clear to the public that emergency contraceptives delay ovulation and do not prevent implantation, not only for the sake of women’s health, but for the sake of science and scientific accuracy.

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62 comments

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12:16AM PDT on Apr 7, 2013

The political garbage over this has given me a bad taste about the republican party and some religious groups, radicals.... However, I call myself conservative this is the first time I voted mostly democrat to protect the rights of women.

10:35AM PDT on Aug 28, 2012

educate! misinformation is making it too easy for the religious right

10:01AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

Education is need, information is a treasure!!!

2:56PM PDT on Jun 8, 2012

Indeed, it is not an "embryo-killing" pill. Those pesky sperm can hang around in there, waiting for an egg, for several days!

5:36PM PDT on Jun 7, 2012

So what if it is an abortive pill?

11:36AM PDT on Jun 7, 2012

"Who the hell made you GOD?"

Since there IS no "god", it would be HIMSELF.

11:37PM PDT on Jun 6, 2012

I wish more people would get educated and realise this is NOT an abortion pill! I live in Ireland where abortion is illegal and I couldnt tell you how many people I know think this pill causes an abortion, some of the same people wouldnt get it due to this misinformation. the idiots who deliberately spread this lie around must be happy with themselves, people are STILL not believing the morning after pill simply prevents a pregnancy.

8:03PM PDT on Jun 6, 2012

@Steve R...you keep saying that you don't want your daughters to have this and to have that unless YOU approve. We all know, for you it's all about CONTROL! You want to control every aspect of your kids and your poor wife's life. Well, here's a little heads up, the more you try to control someone, the less control you'll ever have over them. You think your kids have told you everything they've done in their lives? Since you already admitted to beating them, they probably never told you ANYTHING. You're a vile, hateful creature with a caveman attitude.
And John M...change the EFFN record! You come here daily and say the EXACT same thing over and over. How many kids do you have and how many times have you had sex? If you have one kid, then it damned well had better been only once or you're the biggest hypocrite on this site.
GOD! I am SO sick of these male cretins coming here and thinking they have ANY right to tell a woman what she can and can't do with her OWN BODY! Who the hell made you GOD?

5:53PM PDT on Jun 6, 2012

it is offensive such stupid ignorant people even have the potential to get power and redesign our lives ..

5:05PM PDT on Jun 6, 2012

How many times do some people have to be told, the morning after pill prevents pregnancy,it doesn't end it. I swear,it's like talking to a brick wall.

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Kristina Chew Kristina Chew teaches and writes about ancient Greek and Latin and is Online Advocacy and Marketing... more
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