People’s Court Puts Agrochemical Giants on Trial

Shruthi’s hands have only four digits, oddly splayed and disfigured. Her deformed right lower limb has been amputated. Her mother, who died of cancer six years ago, is one of an estimated 4,000 people killed by endosulfan sprayed on the cashew plantations around her village in Kerala, India.

Around the world, pesticides kill an estimated 355,000 people every year. Many more suffer debilitating illnesses, bear children with shocking disabilities, and ingest poisons through food and water, including the breast milk of nursing mothers.

In early December, the Permanent People’s Tribunal (PPT) Session on Agrochemical Transnational Corporations (TCNs) convened in Bangalore, India to hear testimony against the six companies most responsible for ongoing, massive violations of people’s rights to life, livelihood and health. The six companies on trial—Syngenta, Bayer, Dow, DuPont, BASF and Monsanto—are the top producers of agricultural chemicals.

All six were found guilty, as were the United States, Switzerland and Germany. In addition, the technology-importing states were found culpable for not pursuing less hazardous agriculture. The Tribunal also called to task international agencies such as WHO, FALO, ILO and WTO. They made recommendations to all levels and called on states to pursue criminal action against the chemical manufacturers.

The Tribunal was a fitting way to observe the anniversary of the Bhopal disaster. The 1984 explosion at a Union Carbide pesticide plant caused hundreds of thousands of injuries and led to the deaths of an estimated 25,000.

The toll of death, disease and disability continues. During four days of testimony, four technical witnesses and 15 survivors spoke of poisoned children, reproductive and other health effects, animals feminized by atrazine, declining bee populations, activists killed and injured, land and water contaminated and children exploited.

More than 7,000 people and 400 people’s organizations have endorsed the PPT Session on Agrochemical TCNs. The Tribunal’s recommendations are a blueprint for protecting human health, food sovereignty and ecological agriculture.

In spite of overwhelming evidence of human rights violations and health and environmental impacts, chemical companies have bought support among governments, scientists and farmers. It will take a global Occupy Agriculture movement to counter the insidious influence of an agricultural system concentrated in a few hands that care more about profit than the future of the planet and its people.

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42 comments

Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogers28 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogers28 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogers28 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogers28 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogers28 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Terry V.
Terry V4 years ago

A Little Good News

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4lyjseJMG0

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Lisa C.
Lisa Ryan5 years ago

I've already started my own little "Occupy Agriculture"--by growing what I can in my yard and house. With organic methods. Conserving and recycling and repurposing what I can. The more I do this, the less dependent I am on big corporations. And there is a growing movement toward buying locally grown produce (what one can't grow themselves.), Using 'heirloom' vegies and saving seed, and the 'urban homesteading' movement. I consider this my civic duty for a multitude of reasons!

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Eternal Gardener
Eternal Gardener5 years ago

Someone needs to stop them!!!!

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Sarah Metcalf
Sarah M5 years ago

When are people gonna get it through their heads that traditional agriculture is the best in every way--for workers, consumers, and the environment.

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Jo Asprec
Jo Asprec5 years ago

Bravo People's Court! Go, go, go! More success!

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