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“Plus-Size” Model Wants to Do Away with “Plus-Size” Label

“Plus-Size” Model Wants to Do Away with “Plus-Size” Label

There is no doubt that the fashion industry has seen a surge in activity from “plus-size” models over the last few years. While this is something I find very promising, it’s a bit of a catch-22 because while I’d like to see more and more “plus-size” models on the runways and in major fashion campaigns, I do struggle with the “plus-size” label – as does one of the industry’s newest rising “plus-size” stars, Marquita Pring.

In a recent interview with New York Magazine, Pring shares her thoughts on “plus-size” modeling and her hope that one day we can do away completely with the “plus-size” label.

Here are some highlights from the interview.

Pring setting the record straight on working to maintain a “plus-size” body through diet and exercise:

“I work hard to maintain my size. People often think that by being a plus-size model we just let go of ourselves and have no self-control. I work harder than some of the smaller girls. We have to maintain our size and be careful not to fluctuate too drastically, especially when we have consistent clients that need us at specific measurements.”

“I’ve always been athletic, so working out is something I enjoy and do regularly.”

“As far as diet goes, I’m a fairly healthy eater. Love to start my day with oatmeal or Ezekiel bread and fruit. Salads, chicken, and fish are major parts of my diet.”

Pring on the fashion industry accepting an array of body types:

“My stance is that the industry needs to embrace diverse women.”

“I don’t think this uprising of curvier models is just a trend. I think people are realizing that we are healthy, beautiful, happy women who are finally being discovered.”

“I mean, let’s be honest, economically and psychologically it is in everyone’s best interest to include all sizes and models, regardless of the titles put on them. Designers will be making a lot more money by embracing a wider range of sizes, and women everywhere will start to feel better about themselves when they finally realize that to be beautiful, they do not need to conform to someone else’s ideal.”

Pring on doing away with the “plus-size” label altogether:

“Well, for one, I think we need to phase out the category ‘plus-size models.’ I’m a model. I’m doing the same catalogue and editorial jobs as the ‘normal’ models.”

“Slowly, as designers start incorporating bigger girls into their shows and campaigns, I’m confident people will start seeing us as normal, healthy models who are just as beautiful and capable as the girls we are used to seeing.”

Bravo Ms. Pring! I have to say I’m very excited to see how this 20-year-olds’ career unfolds and the mark she will undoubtedly leave in the fashion industry – “plus-size” label be damned!

Related from Care2:

“Plus-Size” Model Crystal Renn Struggles to Keep Weight On 

Women More Likely To Buy Clothes When Models Look Like Them 

In Pepsi’s New Campaign, “Skinny” Means “Confident”

Read more: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Photo by Mandiberg used under a Creative Commons license - http://www.flickr.com/photos/theredproject/2831350088/

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2:48PM PST on Feb 16, 2013

I feel we should all just be healthy. I'm fourteen, 5'6, and around 97 pounds. I might be thinner, but it was just the way I was born, and I feel hurt when people say that what I am is disgusting and slowly becoming more and more ugly to people. I think, as long as we're in a healthy range, it should be accepted. The same goes for fuller people. Plus-size models should be within a healthy weight range, as well, because that image can be just as harmful as a dangerously skinny model. With the obesity epidemic in America, weight-gain cannot be handled lightly.

4:08PM PST on Jan 9, 2013

lets hope so

6:50AM PST on Jan 8, 2013

Bravo Mrs Pring...someone with a brain in the fashion industry....it does not happen often!!!

6:29AM PST on Jan 8, 2013

How about not making a normal/regular/not sickly thin size a matter of a PLUS size??? It's not PLUS it's normal!!! By saying plus you say its not normal.....

4:25AM PST on Jan 8, 2013

It absolutely kills me that plus size sometimes is a 10 or a 12. How is that a PLUS SIZE? Getting rid of the label plus size would be a start in the industry and a good one. Recognizing that everyone is not a 0 or 00, 2, 4, 6, or 8 would be good. Starlets are 2-4, the average model is 0 or 00. The average woman was, as of 2 years ago a 10-12. I imagine now, many average women are 14-16.

1:50PM PST on Jan 7, 2013

Forget the label! - beats the heck out of terrifying anorexic looking paragons.

11:20AM PST on Jan 7, 2013

Brava! I'm a professional plus model in London and New York, and your work has been an inspiration in the industry! And the rest of you, did you even read her article? She talks about healthy eating and working out, so please tell me how that promotes obesity? I do not know one working plus model who doesn't work out or watch what she eats.

2:57AM PST on Jan 7, 2013

This is some kind of respect and dignity

6:30AM PDT on May 31, 2011

How can plus size mean the same thing as normal average woman? Unhealthy should not be promoted. People should not carry around unhealthy fat just as they should not be overly thin. Health and well being should be the rule. Labels make people uncomfortable lose the plus in plus size.

6:45PM PDT on Apr 5, 2011

Beyonce has 42" hips. Approximately size 12-14.

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