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Presidential And Republican Weekly Addresses: March 10, 2012 [VIDEO]

Presidential And Republican Weekly Addresses: March 10, 2012 [VIDEO]

In this week’s weekly addresses, President Barack Obama discusses how new technology and clean energy helps to create jobs, while the Republican party, represented by North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple, tells about how his state is thriving due to tax decreases and an upsurge in oil investments.

President Obama:

Governor Dalrymple:

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6:36PM PDT on Apr 2, 2012

Noted.

4:30AM PDT on Mar 12, 2012

s that received billions of taxpayers' dollars from the Obama Administration to create American jobs and 'green' technology have failed to meet expectations. [They have spent most of their money, have produced nothing practical, and have paid executive bonuses. Here is a hard look at two of them, which are producing electric cars for the super-rich. One company assembles its cars in Finland. So much for American jobs.]

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/green-firms-fed-cash-give-execs-bonuses-fail/story?id=15851653#.T1YhcfV_xeA

How many times does this imposter have to DO the exact opposite of what he SAYS before y'all get fed up with his hypocrisy?!

6:04PM PDT on Mar 11, 2012

THAT'S the heart of the Republican't plan for completely solving the budget crisis and energy crunch. Emulate North Dakota dollar for dollar.
Good luck with that, Gov. Dalrymple. That's quite a load of standard Republican't b.s. you're trying to sell.

5:56PM PDT on Mar 11, 2012

2) So that the citizens have the same 2012 living standard, with no budget deficit or stress whatsoever, and which reflects the glorious fiscal paradise that, according to Governor Dalrymple, North Dakota now enjoys, we must ANNIHILATE ABOUT 270,000,000 AMERICANS so that 37,522,000 people remain in the 3,794,000 square mile nation, leaving 9.89 people per sq. mile instead of its current 82.63, and so impose proportionately less demand on highways, hospitals, schools, and the general welfare of the population. In other words, we would have to make a transition back to the 1880 population and the1985 budget to have an easily affordable 2013 lifestyle... Who’s first?

Gov. Dalrymple also blatantly misquotes the possibility of the U.S. achieving energy independence. Yes, it IS possible -- but not with fossil fuel, no matter how much we drill (and even if huge new oil and gas fields were found), not with our vast national waste of industrial energy and home electricity, not without a multi-hundred-billion-dollar smart power grid, not without a vast increase in alternative energies, and not with 300 million cars and trucks that get under 100 miles per gallons. Forget about it. More Republican't bull****. AND also more tacit "conservative" ExxonKeystoneKoch sucker demands that they be allowed to drill wherever and however they please, the safety of our air, land and water be damned and they can exploit it with little or no regulation. THAT'S the heart of the Republican't pl

5:55PM PDT on Mar 11, 2012

It is said that because so many young people have left rural N. Dakota for careers and lives in the big cities that the state has about the same number of people now as THE LATE IN 19TH CENTURY.

Given the money required to maintain infrastructure, roads, schools -- ALL government budgetary costs -- of thinly populated N. Dakota, that has so much farmland or undeveloped land WHERE NO ONE LIVES, it's easy--and disingenuous--to compare its relatively favorable budget to tightly packed, highly developed, heavily burdened infrastructure states like NJ, NY or California, or for that matter the U.S. as a whole. That is, all other factors being equal, if we in the U.S. want a budget no more stressed than N. Dakota--the state spends $7.2 billion a year (and has $7.8 billion in federal non-defense dollars spent on it)--or about $15 BILLION A YEAR OUT OF $6.3 TRILLION TOTAL FED AND STATE EXPENDITURES, then we should be prepared to do one of two totally drastic things, or perhaps both:
1) Cut federal monies FOR NEARLY ALL NATIONAL GOODS, SERVICES, INFRASTRUCTURE, EDUCATION, DEFENSE, WELFARE, INTEREST, ETC. TO A PERCENTAGE RELATIVE TO THE PALTRY NUMBER OF N. DAKOTA -- that is, to something UNDER $$ TWO TRILLION, or at least 60% LESS, FOR ALL 50 STATES -- which means, NO MEDICARE, NO SOCIAL SECURITY, NO ROAD REPAIR, NO SCHOOLS, VAST CUTS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT -- IN EFFECT, AN ATROPHIED, VANISHED, INEFFECTUAL GOVERNMENT INDUCING A NATION TO CRUMBLE AND FALL INTO CHAOS

or

2) So that

5:54PM PDT on Mar 11, 2012

I found North Dakota's Gov. Dalrymple's weekly Republican't address quite interesting. He made some good points -- along with the usual delusional and deceptive, fact-and-analysis free assertions so common to these things.
It's all so easy. If the U.S. as a whole just emulates the fiscal wisdom of North Dakota, we'd be so much better off.
But...maybe not. A few facts I've spent an hour or so googling up.

North Dakota is a beautiful, large, rugged, classic wild west state. It is the 19th state by size, at a bit less than 70,000 sq. miles. At 683,000 people, it is also the 47th state by population. It has only about 60,000 more people than 48th Vermont, but with over seven times its size. North Dakota's population density is about 9.89 people per sq. mile. By contrast, the most populous state in the U.S., New Jersey, at 8,721 sq. miles (some of that water), and 8.8 million people, has 1,189 people per square mile. That's about 120 times as many people as N. Dakota in a state 1/8 the size.
As a rule of thumb, the rest of the U.S. population of about 307,317,000 (excluding N. Dakota) and land area, 3,724,000 sq. miles (again excluding N. Dakota) averages 82.63 people per square mile. North Dakota, then (I looked it up) has about 0.21% of the total 308,000,000, 50-state U.S. population, less than 12% of the average U.S. population density on about 1.8% of the total U.S. land area. It is said that because so many young people have left rural N. Dakota for careers and live

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