Orphaned Owls Return to the Wild (VIDEO)

We often see videos of small orphaned animals saved, but due to human intervention, they are then destined to spend the rest of their lives in some sort of confinement. 
But here’s a different story. 

Three little owls were found on the ground when their nest fell out of a tree.  They were saved and fed, and efforts were made to keep them from becoming attached to humans. 
But then came the problem of getting them back in the wild. 

Watch how one of the owls was snuck back into an existing nest when the mother owl was away…


 

Photo credit: Steve Jurvetson

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98 comments

Elisa F.
Elisa F.2 years ago

So cute! I hope they went on to have a nice life together :) Thanks for sharing.

Ioana Boca
Ioana B.4 years ago

i hope the little owls make it.

Elizabeth M.
Elizabeth M.4 years ago

National Geographic blocked the video.
I love owls, and have lots of hope that these will make it in the wild! Thanks for this Chris.

Nellie K A.
Nellie K Adaba5 years ago

Great

Jennifer Thompson

This is so heart warming. Thank goodnes they fond a nest to add the orphan to. You just know that baby owl will learn what it needs to learn from its adopted mother.

Gita Sasi Dharan
Gita Sasi Dharan5 years ago

I am sure they will make it.

ChanTlalok Rain C.
ChanTlalok C.5 years ago

thanx Cris, God Bless.

Patricia T.
Patricia T.5 years ago

I love owls--they are so beautiful. I love ppl who do stuff like this too--they're awesome. Thank you for sharing this wonderful, sweet story.

Christine S.

I hope they will make it!

Peter B.
Peter B.5 years ago

The welfare of young wild animals - and birds - needs much more than some well-meaning individuals can supply. It's all very well for us to just push back young ones into their environment & hope that they'll be able to fend for themselves. However, if they're not old enough they just WON'T be able to survive. It's imperative that the opinion of experts is found before any action is taken. Being kept in 'proper' aviary condiitions for life is surely better than a few too young owls dying of hunger or neglect