Secure Land Rights And The Fight Against Global Poverty [Video]

Among one of the most vexing challenges facing the developing world is securing land rights. The ability to own and confidently transfer title to an interest in land is crucial in increasing agricultural productivity, creating food stability, and breaking the cycle of global poverty.

Landesa, The Rural Development Institute, created this video to explain the impact of secure land rights in Rwanda.

For more on how to get involved in visit Landesa.org.

Photo from This is My Land: Rwanda via Landesa.org

29 comments

Jennifer C.
Past Member 4 years ago

Thank you.

Elaine A.
Elaine Al Meqdad4 years ago

Well the old saying goes is that "If you give a man a fish he eats for that day, but teach him how to fish and he will never go hungry!

Milan L.
Milan L.4 years ago

Nice to meet you, Richard W. You come the closest to a "kindred soul" as I have met in a long time. I had a quick browse through Capitalism 3.0 and at this stage I also recommend it to all "People of Godwill". Peter Barnes and his Group certainly are well acquainted with the writings of Henry George and I hope that his re-statement of Georges call for reform will find good reception among all fair-minded people everywhere.

P. Barnes - it seems to me - is unduly circumspect towards the Corporate Hydra staring at him from the back of his audience, but perhaps he has a good reason. There is no need to irritate the "beast" any more than is unavoidable; it will cause quite enough damage before it is brought to heel.

Donna Hamilton
Donna Hamilton4 years ago

Thanks for posting.

Vicky Pitchford
Vicky P.4 years ago

thanks

Tim Cheung
Tim C.4 years ago

ty

Danuta Watola
Danuta Watola4 years ago

Thanks for the information

Richard B.
Richard B.4 years ago

Check out Peter Barnes' book "Capitalism 3.0". His book can be downloaded free at http://capitalism3.com/home .

Milan L.
Milan L.4 years ago

Dee W./ Your post is not entirely clear to me, but at least you are starting to tackle the age-old confusion about property rights. Like you, I can't accept as valid the claim of the "less than 1%" to this entire planet, nor in fact even to one square inch of it. Why not? Because no man (or woman) has produced any part of it by his(or her) own effort. It is the natural source and storehouse of all the life support of every living thing. If anyones claim of ownership is accepted as valid then other peoples' equal access to life support is to that extent curtailed.

I do not however share your opinion on ownership of our bodies. I maintain that I am the sole and exclusive owner of mine and by extention also of all the wealth that it produces.

The "Elephant In The Room" in view of the above is the fact that the whole product of my labour is my own in its entirety.and the (unimproved) rental value of all the land as well as all the royalties for the countrys' natural resources must in all justice be collected by the Administration to cover all the legitimate needs of the whole community.

That is in essence all that Henry George taught our great-grandfathers 130 years ago. We may forgive them for not acting on it then, but I wonder if our descendants will forgive us as well.

Wim Z., You ought to be blacklisted for your mischief.

Marianna B M.

noted