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Saving Lives: New Hope Against AIDS, Malaria and TB

Saving Lives: New Hope Against AIDS, Malaria and TB

By Kathy Bushkin Calvin, CEO, United Nations Foundation

You may not have heard of the Global Fund for AIDS Malaria and Tuberculosis, but for 5.7 million people since 2002, it has meant the difference between life and death. 

The Global Fund is a partnership between governments and the private sector, pooling collective resources for the fight against the world’s three most deadly communicable diseases.  Since its launch seven years ago, the Global Fund has committed over $19.3 billion in 144 countries.  That equals over two-thirds of all international financing to fight Malaria and TB and is funding treatment for half of all AIDS patients in the developing world.   

There is good news

Behind these statistics are millions of personal stories of triumph. These stories have been largely untold—until now.  A groundbreaking documentary narrated by renowned primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall will premiere at a special screening event at National Geographic in Washington, D.C. on September 16The film, “A New Picture of Health,” shows how individuals and families have harnessed resources from the Global Fund to overcome disease and build healthier and more prosperous communities. 

“‘A New Picture of Health’ illustrates how investments in the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria are empowering local communities, strengthening health systems, and creating healthier, more productive sectors of society,” says Jane Goodall, who is also a UN Messenger of peace. “These are intimately linked to global conservation and security.”

A critical time

The film debuts at an important moment.  In September, heads of state will gather at the United Nations to renew their commitment to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and the Global Fund is central to reaching the MDGs. “I’ve been working in Africa for 50 years now, and have seen firsthand the impact of disease on communities,” says Goodall. “The Global Fund is playing a critical role in achieving the health Millennium Development Goals to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, and combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other illnesses.”

The U.S. Government is the Global Fund’s largest donor.  If we are serious about our commitment to fighting these diseases, we need to continue our support as the Fund faces a replenishment need between $13 and $20 billion over the next three years.  For every $1 the U.S. provides to the Global Fund, more than $3 is distributed on the ground to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The Global Fund’s success, particularly in saving the lives of women and children, is in large part due to U.S. investment.

But don’t take my word for it. Watch this trailer of “The New Picture of Health” for a glimpse of how the Global Fund is improving communities all around the world. 

 

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United Nations Foundation
by Kathy Bushkin Calvin, CEO, United Nations Foundation

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293 comments

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6:47AM PDT on Sep 1, 2012

Thanks.

10:12AM PDT on Mar 27, 2012

thank you

2:30PM PDT on Sep 27, 2010

Thank-you for the informative article & video. I also want to thank Jennifer E. for mentioning vitamin C. I personally take vitamins & other assorted supplements & have most of my life. As Jennifer said, humans cannot produce Vitamin C on their own. A person's vitamin C storage is depleted when they are fighting an infection or some type of inflammatory process. I have read several times that vitamin C in larger doses will cause a harmless diarrhea. Lower the dosage of vitamin C until the diarrhea stops & the dose that stops causing the diarrhea is the amount of vitamin C a person needs daily. The dosing needs to be higher than the pitiful amounts of thirty or fifty mg/day. My daily dose when I am not ill with a cold or having a bad allergy attack/hay fever is five to six Grams a day. Vitamin C is better absorbed when taken with a bioflavonoid. Bioflavonoids themselves are also not produced in our bodies either. Thus, many preparations of Vitamin C often have the bioflavonoids already in the preparation of. Two good bioflavonoids are Bromelain, an enzyme obtained from pineapple & Quercetin. Not only do they work with Vitamin C, they also have an excellent anti-inflammatory effect. I would also suggest a Vitamin B Complex as well, which is especially helpful when one is experiencing alot of stress as one does when they are ill. I thank-you for taking the time to read this. Please do have a pleasant day.

2:30PM PDT on Sep 27, 2010

Thank-you for the informative article & video. I also want to thank Jennifer E. for mentioning vitamin C. I personally take vitamins & other assorted supplements & have most of my life. As Jennifer said, humans cannot produce Vitamin C on their own. A person's vitamin C storage is depleted when they are fighting an infection or some type of inflammatory process. I have read several times that vitamin C in larger doses will cause a harmless diarrhea. Lower the dosage of vitamin C until the diarrhea stops & the dose that stops causing the diarrhea is the amount of vitamin C a person needs daily. The dosing needs to be higher than the pitiful amounts of thirty or fifty mg/day. My daily dose when I am not ill with a cold or having a bad allergy attack/hay fever is five to six Grams a day. Vitamin C is better absorbed when taken with a bioflavonoid. Bioflavonoids themselves are also not produced in our bodies either. Thus, many preparations of Vitamin C often have the bioflavonoids already in the preparation of. Two good bioflavonoids are Bromelain, an enzyme obtained from pineapple & Quercetin. Not only do they work with Vitamin C, they also have an excellent anti-inflammatory effect. I would also suggest a Vitamin B Complex as well, which is especially helpful when one is experiencing alot of stress as one does when they are ill. I thank-you for taking the time to read this. Please do have a pleasant day.

3:54AM PDT on Sep 27, 2010

I agree with you Star Mousie (16th Sept), about the impact of antibiotics on infectious diseases.

But we forget the most powerful antibiotic on the planet and the one which bugs can't become immune or resistant to. Simple old vitamin C!!

Most animals, including many mammals, make enormous amounts of their own vitamin C and they drink dirty water and eat rotten food and all sorts of things which would knock us down. They have an enzyme which converts glucose to vitamin C, but humans have lost this ability, though we have the dormant gene in our DNA. The vitamin C keeps them well.

We need to go back to basics and look at just what size dose of vitamin C is required to do some of these tasks in the body. Big pharma has suppressed so much of the research and literature on this, and mindless media follow them like sheep, only reporting what they want covered.

11:00AM PDT on Sep 25, 2010

I'm glad to see this organization is doing more than just providing medical care, but works with governments, religious organizations, and economics to save lives and prevent the spread of these diseases. I would've liked to have heard more about prevention, especially regarding HIV as that involves much more in the way of sexual attitudes, gender attitudes, needle use, mores, morals, etc. As long as nothing is being done to PREVENT passage of the disease and the behaviors/attitudes behind it, the disease will continue to live on and spread.

My best to this organization and its participants!

3:08AM PDT on Sep 25, 2010

Thanks.

12:27AM PDT on Sep 24, 2010

show them how to use a condom that would solve nearly all there promlems

9:13AM PDT on Sep 23, 2010

Thank you for letting us be aware.

7:39AM PDT on Sep 23, 2010

Thanks. This is majorly important

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