START A PETITION 27,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
1,279,705 people care about Politics

To Fight Piracy, Internet & Media Companies Join Forces

To Fight Piracy, Internet & Media Companies Join Forces

Or rather, U CAN HAS UR BIT TORRENTZ 4 NOW BUT.

In an effort to combat the illegal downloading of music and movies, the US’s top internet providers have agreed to a new policy. Rather than descending on the teenager next door with a million-dollar lawsuit — which turned out to be “something of a public relations disaster” for music companies for going after, among others, a 12-year-old girl who downloaded songs using Kazaa) — media companies have made a deal with the likes of AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Verizon and Time Warner Cable to give the illegal download-offender a different kind of penalty in a series of six warnings: Those accused of digital copyright infringement will first receive emails. If they continue to download content illegally, they will face “mitigation measures” including slower connection speeds or even being blocked from browsing the internet. They will not, though, be terminated indefinitely from accessing the Web.

Users will also have the option of obtaining an independent review for a fee of $35, notes Reuters.

The Motion Picture Association of America is among the media companies involved in the new policy, along with representatives for independent record companies and filmmakers. It’s an alliance that, says the New York Times, “demonstrates how the once-clear line separating those two businesses has been blurred.”

Eight years ago, the Recording Industry Association of America had to sue Verizon to try to uncover the identity of a customer who was sharing music online. This year, Comcast completed its merger with NBC, bringing an owner of digital content and a conduit for it under the same roof.

Now the Internet providers are hoping to profit as they pipe music and video of the nonpirated variety to their customers.

“The I.S.P.’s want to cooperate with Hollywood because the carriers recognize that their own growth depends in part on bundled content strategies,” said Eric Garland of BigChampagne, which tracks online media traffic. “They don’t want to be just utilities providing Internet access, but premium content distributors as well.”

Content providers — the media companies — will indeed be working with internet providers in a coalition to stop piracy. :

Under the agreement, the content owners will deliver evidence of illegal file-sharing to the Internet providers, which are then responsible for sending alerts and meting out penalties. The Internet providers will not disclose the identity of the offending customer to the media companies.

One further way they’ll profit is that, if your internet access is reduced due to illegal downloading, you still have to pay for the service, or pay the fees if you try to break your contract for service.

According to the coalition of media companies and internet providers, the new policy is not like the “three strikes” one adopted in some European countries, in which a repeated copyright offenders are barred from Internet access, notes Reuters:

“This is not a three-strikes plan. It creates no new laws or legal procedures,” Tom Dailey, Deputy General Counsel for Verizon, said on a conference call.

The primary distinction seems to be that this is not being put forward as law, but rather a series of “best practices” that Internet providers will implement voluntarily. Coalition members said on the call that they will not be pushing for new legislation stemming from this initiative.

While music and arts groups are applauding the new policy, internet rights advocates like Public Knowledge and the Center for Democracy and Technology are concerned that consumers could now be penalized “based on allegations that have not been tested in court.” Others, including internet music experts, are doubtful that the new policy, which is mostly aimed at those using tools like BitTorrent to share files, will really end internet piracy.

Indeed, I’m imagining that someone out there is figuring out some new way to upload files and make them accessible and (as yet) undetectable even as the new policy is put into place: It’s a wild, wild Web out there.

 

Related Care2 Coverage

What Google’s Transparency Report Reveals

Netflix Sued For Violating the Americans with Disabilities Act

UN Declares Internet a “Fundamental Human Right”

Read more: , , , , , , , , ,

Photo by Paulpod

have you shared this story yet?

some of the best people we know are doing it

37 comments

+ add your own
4:24PM PDT on Sep 12, 2011

oh, copyright, a headache, a nessessary. it'll help me bash someone's face in with a lawsuit if they took my drawings and sold 50,000 shirts with it on them, acting like they did it. they make it so you aren't allowed to upload to youtube what you do not own.

why oh why do I not 200% understand fair use?

licances for software are expensive. you buy the disk software and premission to use it. people tell me not to thorw a fit if someone takes my art. it was my fault for showing the world.
but where would be my affordable lawyers if my stuff is stolen? could I get more than reembersed? they sue a little girl for downloading money. money and public flogging for copyright infrigment "art theft' seems fair?

if I download a song I am not selling it and saying I wrote it. why do people act like it is nothing when people's photos and drawings are taken? it is still a big deal. both lost out. but to have someone go "I made this". you'd want their teeth.

5:03AM PDT on Jul 21, 2011

Susan twenty-eight must be right--it is publishers rather than artists that want intellectual property rights.

10:55AM PDT on Jul 11, 2011

The right thing to do would have been charging the people ripping off the media and putting it online in the first place.
not the downloaders.

You can be damn sure that I'm not going to watch/play any media that's involved with this.
Boycott them all.
Our protections are more important than your bottom line.




1:02PM PDT on Jul 10, 2011

I do not see that bootlegger, ever. And the companies are FAR FARRRRR from losing money. They are making record profits.

So there goes your argument.

2:50AM PDT on Jul 10, 2011

Every time I go to the laundromat, there's a guy there selling bootleg movies. I used to work with a guy who was friends with a semi-professional movie bootlegger. People don't think anything of saving a few bucks to buy a bootlegged movie, and that mentality could really hurt Hollywood. It didn't thrill the music industry, but bands that build a big enough audience can make money touring and merchandising. The thing that amazes me is that no one who buys these bootlegs seems to realize that if movie making stops being profitable, movies will cease to be made.

2:48AM PDT on Jul 10, 2011

In Slovenia we have piracy tax since 2006 called "compensation amounts for private and other
internal reproduction"

We are paying this tax, even if we don't use media for piracy.
Like SD cards for digital camera or GPS ...

For example
- Tape recorder - tape, and - other similar device 0.7$ b) device for image recording: - video and - other similar device 6$
DVD audio CD - DVD audio / video DVD - DVD MD (minidisc), and - other similar device 9$;
Computer unit CD - DVD computer unit, and - other similar device 1,5$ .

Even for photocopying we pay 0.005 $ for single copy.


Pure rip-off!

this is Google translated document

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=sl&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=sl&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uradni-list.si%2F1%2Fobjava.jsp%3Furlid%3D2006103%26stevilka%3D4439

6:25PM PDT on Jul 9, 2011

should have done that from the beginning...

5:23PM PDT on Jul 9, 2011

Just another excuse to rake our privacy rights over the coal and criminalize our youth and charge us more and more until there is nothing left.

4:26PM PDT on Jul 9, 2011

ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ABOLISH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

4:26PM PDT on Jul 9, 2011

Lesleah, in order for music to be played on the radio, a radio station has to pay for permission to air a song. I don't know if that's a fixed amount for a specific length of time or a pay-per-play kind of thing (where the station would pay to play a particular song, say, 300 times over the course of a month). It's my understanding that, in order to play "Born This Way" by Lady Gaga, your local station has to have permission to play that song specifically; on the flip side of that, the station CAN'T play any other song on that album, unless Gaga's label grants them permission to do so - for which they'd have to pay more money.

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

Care2 - Be Extraordinary - Start a Care2 Petition
ads keep care2 free
CONTACT THE EDITORS

Recent Comments from Causes

1) He helped promote and pass the Affordable Care Act. That's not necessarily positive, it has done…

Getting another pet when a beloved pet dies puts a bandaid over the hole in your heart so natural healing…

what an awesome idea lets put them all in a different zoo and watch them reproduce! they should all be…

meet our writers

Kristina Chew Kristina Chew teaches and writes about ancient Greek and Latin and is Online Advocacy and Marketing... more
ads keep care2 free

more from causes

Animal Welfare

Causes Canada

Causes UK

Children

Civil Rights

Education

Endangered Wildlife

Environment & Wildlife

Global Development

Global Warming

Health Policy

Human Rights

LGBT rights

Politics

Real Food

Trailblazers For Good

Women's Rights




Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.