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Yes, Your Dog Knows What You’re Thinking

Yes, Your Dog Knows What You’re Thinking

A psychology professor at the University of Portsmouth in the U.K., Juliane Kaminski, has just published a study that, she says, provides scientific evidence of what many of us have observed and suspected, that domestic dogs have an understanding of what we humans are thinking and intending to do.

Earlier research has found that dogs look to humans’ eyes as a signal when making decisions about what to do and also that they “respond more willingly to attentive humans, than inattentive ones.” But having the ability to know what someone else is thinking — having “theory of mind” — has been assumed to be an ability that only humans have had (though research has shown that crows and chimpanzees “seem to know when someone else can or can’t see them and can also remember what others have seen in the past”).

A Series of Experiments To Test Dogs’ Cognition

To prove what many have had a hunch about, Kaminski (you can her and her dog Ambula on the university’s website) had to devise a way of testing the dogs to show that they can grasp a human point of view. She created a series of different experiments to see whether dogs are more likely to take food when they think nobody can see them.

42 female and 42 male dogs who were a year or older were tested. When forbidden to take food, Kaminski found that the dogs were four times more likely to disobey when they were in a dark room rather than one that had light. This suggests that dogs can discern whether or not human beings can see in the dark. (It’snot certain how well dogs themselves can see in the dark; they very well rely on other sensory information, such as that of smell, to figure out if there is food available.)

For dogs to be able to understand that humans cannot seem them in certain circumstances (e.g., a dark room) is “incredible,” , says Kaminski. It means that dogs have a sense of “the human perspective” and of how this might be different from their own (canine) perspective.

On the University of Portsmouth’s website, people offer some intriguing stories suggesting that their dogs are aware of what they are thinking. People placed a plate of chocolate chip cookies on top of their refrigerator to keep their Irish Setter from helping himself. Not only did he do so when they went out, but was careful to eat only the cookies at the back of the plate so that his snacking would be less likely to be detected.

But Can Humans Really Know What Dogs Are Thinking?

As Kaminski notes, we humans “constantly attribute certain qualities and emotions to other living things,” including being “clever and sensitive.” But our saying that an animal has such qualities is “us thinking, not them,” she adds.

Regarding her research, skeptics may ask, how can we know for sure that a dog is not simply associating being in a dark room with it having greater access to food — that “dark” means “food”?

Kaminski indeed took such concerns into account in her experiments. For instance, she tested the dogs in rooms with different amounts of light. Dogs who qualified to be participate in the study had to comfortable without their owners in the room and likely ot be motivated by food.

She also emphasizes that “we still can’t be completely sure if the results mean dogs have a truly flexible understanding of the mind and others’ minds. In addition, dogs’ understanding of what humans are thinking may be limited to the “here and now, rather than on any higher understanding.” That is, dogs’ ability to grasp a human perspective may be situational, rather than being based on a broader grasp of the human perspective.

Caveats aside, Kaminski’s research (published in Animal Cognition) offers a fascinating window for us humans to consider what animals are thinking about us.

 

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141 comments

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5:10AM PDT on Oct 16, 2013

Of course he (my dog) knows what I'm thinking, he (metaphorically) walks all over me, and plays my Mother and I like a spoilt child - dumb animals I think not (unless you mean Mum and I LOL)

9:24AM PST on Mar 9, 2013

interesting article, thanks for sharing :)

9:08PM PST on Mar 1, 2013

Thank you.

10:25PM PST on Feb 26, 2013

This is very interesting! So now for all the idiot imbeciles who say that the poor dogs in the China slaughtering markets don't know whats happening to them!!! They can ALL GO TO HELL!!! :( Shared on Facebook.

7:51AM PST on Feb 23, 2013

Well, they could have asked me, my sweetheart Lucky always knows what I think, if I'm angry, sad or happy, even better than me

8:57AM PST on Feb 20, 2013

Of course dogs know what the owner is thinking, I wish I could say the same about most owners. Thanks for the article

8:32PM PST on Feb 19, 2013

Dogs are so intelligent,they amaze me.

2:56PM PST on Feb 19, 2013

That is truth when I say NOT to my dog! He puts sad eyes and Finally I fall down with him!! Sorry I can resist his lovely seeing!! and after 5 minutes we are againg the good friends of all the time

6:52AM PST on Feb 19, 2013

Dogs are intelligent and can sense trouble so they can sense when we are thinking good or bad vibes. ANd even when we are down, they work hard to make us feel good by acting silly or showing how smart they are

10:05AM PST on Feb 18, 2013

Interesting, thanks!

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Kristina Chew Kristina Chew teaches ancient Greek, Latin and Classics at Saint Peter's University in New Jersey.... more
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