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12 Common Cooking Questions

Can you substitute baking soda for baking powder (and vice versa)?

No, no, no, no, no. And yes. Both substances are leavening agents, meaning they make baked goods rise, and baking powder contains baking soda, but they are two different products. Baking soda can be bitter unless combined with an acidic ingredient; baking powder is neutral, as it contains acidic cream of tartar. In a pinch, baking powder can replace baking soda, though be forewarned it may change the finished product. Baking soda can’t replace baking powder unless you also add cream of tartar (2:1).

What’s the difference between a boil, a rolling boil, and a simmer?

A chef friend of mine explains it this way: Imagine the pot is a hot tub and the bubbles are (scantily clad, highly attractive) people. A simmer is when the water is warm and the bubbles are just hanging out around the sides of the tub. A boil is when the water is so hot that people are kind of jumping around the tub. A rolling boil is when the people are trying to leap out of the tub for fear of being burned alive.

How do you keep your cookies from spreading too thin?

The culprit is likely your butter. Softening butter in the microwave is a surefire way to flatten cookies into pancakes. Instead, let the butter sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. To speed the softening process, cut it into tablespoon-size pieces. It should be yielding to a finger but not melted.

What’s the best way to measure dry ingredients?

Wars have been fought over the best way to measure dry ingredients (and the hardcore get around it by weighing their ingredients rather than measuring by volume). The bakers I know prefer the spooning method (using a separate cup or spoon to shovel flour into the measuring cup) to the pouring method or the scooping method. Do not pack the ingredient down. Level with the flat edge of a knife.

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By Kathryn Williams

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Samantha, selected from DivineCaroline

At DivineCaroline.com, women come together to learn from experts in the fields, of health, sustainability, and culture; to reflect on shared experiences; and to express themselves by writing and publishing stories about anything that matters to them. Here, real women publish like real pros. Together, with our staff writers, they’re discussing all facets of women’s lives from relationships and careers, to travel and healthy living. So come discover, read, learn, laugh and connect at DivineCaroline.com.

107 comments

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1:50PM PDT on Mar 11, 2013

Thanks!

5:54AM PST on Dec 14, 2012

Thank you Samantha, for Sharing this!

9:25PM PST on Nov 6, 2012

good tips for everyday use, thanks.

6:45PM PDT on Nov 2, 2012

Actually, there are some Very good table wines that come in a box. Blackbox comes to mind and that octogonal Aussie wine, I think there's a fish on the box.
Don't be such a snob, LOL! And some of the best wines now have twist top caps. Better for the cork trees and found to keep the wine better longer also..

1:25PM PDT on Oct 29, 2012

thanks

10:48PM PDT on Oct 28, 2012

Thanks

6:49AM PDT on Oct 28, 2012

interesting

3:26AM PDT on Oct 28, 2012

thanks for sharing

3:37PM PDT on Oct 27, 2012

Thanks...good tips

9:30PM PDT on Oct 26, 2012

I like this.. thanks :)

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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