START A PETITION 27,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

5 Ways To Practice Happiness

  • 1 of 6
5 Ways To Practice Happiness

By Joe Hart, Experience Life

We travel in search of it, marry for the sake of it, see coaches and therapists to enhance it, switch jobs to capture it, and sock away money to secure it. Yet, for many of us, happiness remains elusive. And even though we spend much of our lives chasing happiness, many of us would be hard-pressed to even define it in the first place.

So what is happiness? Where can we find it? And once we do, how can we keep it?

These are questions that have consumed philosophers, spiritual leaders and artists (to say nothing of folks like you and me) for thousands of years. In the past decade, though, the same questions have attracted the attention of a growing number of psychologists, neurologists, and other respected academics and clinicians.

These researchers are turning their attention toward the mechanics and chemistry of happiness, which they define (in simplified terms) as the emotional experience of having a pleasant, engaged and meaningful life. And their findings are having a dramatic impact not just on the field of psychology, but also on the way many of us are cultivating happiness in our own lives.

5 Happiness Boosters that Do More Harm Than Good

A Look on the Bright Side
A growing number of psychologists who are part of what’s known as the Positive Psychology movement, have shifted their attention to advancing the knowledge of what makes us feel satisfied, energized, hopeful — and happy.

What they’ve discovered is that while overall life satisfaction does have an innate component (some people are just born happier and are wired to stay that way), happiness is also something we can practice and cultivate.

Happiness hinges on our choices, attitudes and thoughts — and when we know more about how these choices, attitudes and thoughts affect the quality of our lives, we have a powerful recipe for cooking up more lifelong joy, meaning and satisfaction.

Below are five of the fundamental conclusions from “happiness studies” done in recent years. Many of them sound like commonsense realizations — principles you’d think that we’d all be acting on already. But when it comes to creating our own happiness, turning common sense into common practice is a step most of us have yet to make.

  • 1 of 6

Read more: General Health, Health, Inspiration, Mental Wellness, Self-Help, Spirit

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Megan, selected from Experience Life

Experience Life magazine is an award-winning health and fitness publication that aims to empower people to live their best, most authentic lives, and challenges the conventions of hype, gimmicks and superficiality in favor of a discerning, whole-person perspective. Visit experiencelife.com to learn more and to sign up for the Experience Life newsletter, or to subscribe to the print or digital version.

173 comments

+ add your own
2:28PM PDT on Aug 2, 2014

I think it's wrong that there weren't such a subject when I studied psychology , thank you very much :)

9:04PM PST on Feb 17, 2014

Great article.

11:03PM PST on Feb 1, 2014

great info! very helpful!

7:07PM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

thanks.

6:24PM PDT on Aug 19, 2013

Thanks!

2:19AM PDT on Aug 12, 2013

Thank you :)

4:37PM PDT on Jul 18, 2013

Shared, thanks.

2:47PM PDT on Jul 3, 2013

Thank you.

11:40AM PDT on Oct 31, 2012

Thanks for sharing

1:04PM PDT on Aug 14, 2012

Thank you!

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

Cute dog. I HATE kennels and don't blame this dog. I hate those that even invented kennels. I don…

This is a "HOW TO" for people without pets. Noone who has a pet and loves him so much that the loss …

Thanks for the info:)

CONTACT THE EDITORS



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.