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6 Natural Sunburn Remedies

6 Natural Sunburn Remedies

While I do know the basics of skin protection to get me through summer without too much exposure to harmful sun rays ó avoid being outside during the sunís peak hours, wear a wide-brim hat and long sleeves, etc. ó now and again, Iíll get carried away in my garden or at the beach and my carelessness will end with a blistery red neck or arms. In these situations, aloe vera has always been my go-to remedy. (And Iím not referring to the electric-lime- or ocean-blue-colored commercial products that are full of preservatives and toxic chemicals. Hereís a list of five ingredients to avoid in summer skin care products. With aloe, always opt for additive-free liquids or gels, safe for ingesting internally to be sure of quality.)

However, I recently discovered that aloe is merely the star player on a team of herbal sunburn remedies. Author of The Green Pharmacy, James A. Duke, offers a few more botanicals that can soothe sunburned skin, repair damage and leave behind a healthy glow, naturally:

Aloe Vera

Letís start with aloe because it is the best-known summer skin remedy. Aloe is a veritable homegrown first aid kit, with properties that not only cool your skin, but also stop itching from insect bites, relieve bleeding and settle indigestion when taken orally. The plant is easy to grow indoors, and can handle you snipping off a section of a leaf without much fuss. Take a small piece of leaf, peel the rind back and scoop out the jelly inside. Apply this directly to your skin, or for an aloe juice summer drink, muddle the jelly with water and let the solution infuse for 10 minutes before ingesting.

Tea

Both black tea and green tea contain tannic acid and theobromine, believed to cool the heat of sunburns. Research is suggesting that these substances can even help prevent chemical-induced skin cancers. Green tea is also high in polyphenals, which act as potent antioxidants when ingested. You may be making iced tea regularly throughout the summer anyway ó keep in mind that the beverage can be applied topically as well as sipped (itís best to use unsweetened tea for this purpose). If you are already out in the sun, go ahead and put that solar energy to work making sun-brewed tea.

Cucumber

Cucumbers share a few important skin-healing compounds with the aloe plant. The same reason cucumber slices will reduce eye puffiness is the reason it works well for soothing burns. Slice off a piece and rub it on your skin or crush up fruit in a bowl to apply a thicker, pulpy paste. Add it along with some witch hazel and essential oils to create a revitalizing facial toner. Hereís a video to show you how.

Calendula

Calendula flowers speed burn healing by stimulating the growth of new skin cells, closing wounds and reducing inflammation. For this reason, calendula is also exceptional for healing bruises.†Like cucumbers, calendula flowers are super simple to grow in your summer garden.

Plantain

Bananaís cousin isnít on our North American radar too often, and especially when it comes to summer skincare. That needs to change. Plantains contain allantoin, a potent healer of damaged skin cells. The botanical extract if also found in the comfrey plant and in the urine of most mammals (but itís safe to assume youíd rather lather on mashed plantains than urine).

Witch Hazel

In the end, witch hazel may be the cheapest remedy for summer burns. Sold at most drug stores, its alcohol-like qualities quickly evaporate heat from the skin. I like this recipe for an after-sun cream that combines witch hazelís damage control with the rejuvenating, anti-aging properties of both honey and egg whites: Mix 1 teaspoon of witch hazel with 1 tablespoon of honey and a beaten egg white. Apply to the skin and let set for 5 minutes or more before rinsing off. While youíve got the honey and egg whites out, here are four recipes for simple, homemade face masks.

Have fun in the sun!

Related Care2 articles:

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Shelley Stonebrook

Shelley Stonebrook is an Associate Editor at Mother Earth NewsóNorth Americaís most popular magazine about sustainable, self-reliant livingówhere she works on exciting projects such as Organic Gardening content and the Vegetable Garden Planner. Shelley is particularly interested in organic gardening, small-scale, local food production, waste reduction, food preservation and cooking. In her spare time, she posts in her personal blog, The Rowdy Radish.

81 comments

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11:26PM PST on Nov 27, 2013

Thanks for posting this

8:12AM PDT on Sep 21, 2013

Great tips, thanks!

11:30AM PDT on Sep 8, 2013

Tomatoes.

9:28AM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

I could not agree more with Karen F., luckily, for me only for a very short time was I living with necessary sun protection, and Spencer Y.. I would like to add that in unable to plan for* sun dosage is unavoidable I guess; especially, if you are a young child and have to rely on guardians, educators and family members to provide you sun protection. I am NOT saying never going outside &/or moving to live in The Arctic circle is good, protected sun exposure is NECESSARY, your mind set and health is drastically affected one never experiences nature light, artificial light is NOT a healthy substitute.

*- As small amount of exposure/time in sun as possible. If you are going to be in the sun for more than seconds and cannot wear sunscreen, then must wear long clothes, sunglasses and hats covering up skin, unless cannot dress attire determined for you -like Capitalist dictators business- or have to be athletic. With the way The Earth is being forced to changing to be less inhabitable, by our species, this really is the way we have to live.

7:02PM PDT on Sep 4, 2013

Tomato is good too but please, people, take more care in the sun or you'll end up like me with lots of sun damage caused by growing up in Australia before the days of sun protection creams. The sun is good in small doses but I am staggered by the number of people in Australia, especially Queensland, the sun cancer capital of the world, who walk around in the hottest part of the day in bikinis and board shorts, never a hat in sight.

10:09AM PDT on Aug 28, 2013

The number one natural sunburn remedy has to be the shade

7:27PM PDT on Aug 27, 2013

Good to know.

4:41AM PDT on Aug 27, 2013

thanks for the info.

6:57PM PDT on Aug 25, 2013

White vinegar is also good. You'll smell like a salad, but it really eases the pain. Of course, prevention is better..........

1:40PM PDT on Aug 25, 2013

thank you! in case of sunburn one may apply some sour cream to ease the pain and improve healing

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