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7 Kid-Friendly Recipes for Picky Toddlers

7 Kid-Friendly Recipes for Picky Toddlers

Got a kid at home that has decided veggies are for suckers? Check out these kid-friendly recipes for picky eaters, plus some tips on getting through the picky eating phase.

I never thought I’d be sneaking veggies into my kid’s food, but here I am talking about how to sneak nutrition into meals for kiddos. Isn’t it funny how your ideas about parenting change once you pop out a baby?

My son Darrol Henry has always eaten his veggies like a champ. He would pick the kale out of his bowl of pasta, sure. But it was because he wanted to eat it, not toss it onto the floor. Then one day, it was like a switch had flipped. Suddenly, my agreeable baby was tossing all things green. All this kid would eat were pasta and bread. It was a foodie mom’s nightmare. These are some of the toddler recipes that got me through.

7 Kid-Friendly Recipes

1. Veggie Potato Cakes – Hide pureed veggies in mashed potatoes, then bake them in a muffin pan. These work great for lunch or supper, and I pack them in Darrol’s daycare lunch, too!

2. Creamy Kale Pasta Sauce – If your picky eater wants to live on pasta alone, sneak some veggies and protein into the mix!

3. Green Smoothies – When all else fails, serve up those greens in a sippy cup.

4. Vegan Nuggets – These plant-based nuggets are a great toddler finger food recipe with lots of nutrition hiding inside.

5. Hearty Homestyle Spaghetti – Kids love pasta, and that sauce is perfect for hiding extra veggie power.

6. Creamy Mashed Cauliflower - Mashes potatoes, schmashed schmoschmatoes! Serve up this bowl of kid-friendly cruciferous power!

7. Farmhouse Veggie Burger - Veggie burgers are an easy finger food, and this recipe’s a great one. Just skip the fried cabbage if your toddler is on a no-veggie kick.

4 Tips for Picky Eaters

My son’s serious picky eating phase only lasted three or four weeks, thank goodness, and I’m pretty sure there are a few specific strategies that helped us through. Here are some tips on dealing with your picky eater and keeping your sanity while you do it:

1. Keep offering veggies. I know. I wanted to cry every time Darrol tossed a piece of lovingly-prepared  broccoli onto the floor. But keep offering up fresh veggies, even if your kid takes one bite and spits it out. Sometimes it takes a few tries for kids to get used to new tastes, so keep offering those fresh, whole veggies alongside the more “sure thing” toddler recipes listed above.

2. Embrace what he likes. Even during his pickiest period, Darrol would still eat sweet potatoes and avocado, so I made sure to have that available to him at every single meal. This was more a sanity thing for me than anything else. At least you know that your kid is getting some sort of fresh veggies!

3. Offer choices. You can offer a variety of veggies, sure, but also change up the vessels and utensils that you’re using. It might sound crazy, but Darrol Henry will eat roasted summer squash if I offer him a bite from a fork. Present a few pieces on a plate, and he tosses it all onto the floor. He will grudgingly eat a few pieces of organic steamed edamame on his tray, but he’ll gobble it down by the handful if I put it in a bowl for him. Toddlers are made to explore, so mix things up! If they reject that sauteed broccoli on a plate, offer it in a bowl next time.

4. Dont blame yourself. By week two of Darrol’s picky phase, I was feeling pretty despondent. When you spend 45 minutes  preparing a dish from scratch, it’s heartbreaking to watch your toddler reject it. This is easier said, but try to remember that this is less about your cooking and more about your toddler asserting his independence.

Are you dealing with a picky toddler? What kid-friendly recipes are a hit at your house?

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81 comments

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12:43AM PDT on Oct 5, 2014

Thank you!

7:36PM PDT on Aug 11, 2014

Am I the only one who thinks toddlers shouldn't be allowed to be "picky"? I had to eat pretty much everything on my plate, no matter how grossed out I was by it when I was a kid. Now I like just about everything I used to hate.

When did parenting become so lame and ineffectual? Just take a look at today's kids and the proof, if you had any doubt how much parents are failing these days, will slap you in the face.

7:06AM PDT on Jul 28, 2014

Thanks

9:04PM PDT on Jul 27, 2014

thank you

12:48PM PDT on Jul 27, 2014

ty

7:23AM PDT on Jul 27, 2014

These are great :) nice and simple! I hate when you get recipes that have like 30 ingredients!

3:56AM PDT on Jul 27, 2014

When my boys were small I started putting carrots, etc. into spaghetti sauce and stuffing. It worked, they ate them!

9:50PM PDT on Jul 26, 2014

Personally back when my kids were young a good kick in the pants sorted most things out.

8:47PM PDT on Jul 26, 2014

Thank you for sharing.

3:32PM PDT on Jul 26, 2014

PTC tasters can are very sensitive to bitter tastes found in many vegetables. This is a genetic variation and you cannot change it by trying new foods, making kid's stay at the table until they finish or any parenting method. Same way you cannot change eye color by by sitting kid's at the table until the food is gone. Of course you should try to get your kids to eat vegetables. But their failure to like vegetables may not always be the parents' fault. Genetics may render broccoli as appetizing as a tablespoon of baking soda.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
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