8 Disposable Things to Replace Today

Back in the 1950s, Life Magazine published thearticle “Throwaway Living,” which arguedthatthrowing away single-use items wasthe most upscale thing you could do. The idea being, “cleaning up after ourselves was just a waste of time.”

Today, we (theoretically) know the social and environmental risks of living such a careless, wasteful lifestyle. And yet, on average, each one of us still tosses 4.5 pounds of garbage every single day!

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As a society, we are hooked on disposables. We drink a bottle of water (assuming it’s cleaner than tap), then toss the vessel in the trash, rather than usea cup or bottle we could reuse over and over again. News flash: it’s not any better.

We are alsoexcessively obsessed with sanitation. Forget the hankies of the past; tissue in the trash is the way to go!

But is it?

Truthfully, all this obsession with convenience and cleanliness is just a marketing ploy to keep you buying disposables. Who do you think is the better customer: the person who invests in a washable cloth once, or the person who buys a new roll of paper towels every two weeks?

Don’t fall into the disposables trap.

8 Disposable Things to Replace Today

Over the past 60 years or so, we have been conditioned to believe that disposable is better. That it issafer, cleaner and the ‘modern way.’ But you have other, more sustainable options!

Today, more and more people are turning back to simplerforms of living (the Zero Waste lifestyle is a great example of this) and replacing disposable things with reusable, lasting alternatives.

Here are 8 ideas to get you started!

disposable things to replace

1. Paper Towels

Going paperless in the kitchen is one of the simplest ways to reduce household waste. Let go of your paper towel obsession and opt for reusable, washable rags instead. I promise you, you won’t sacrifice cleanliness by making the swap.Here’s a guide to get you started.

Related: 7 Paper Towel Alternatives

2.Plastic Bags

Plastic bags are a nasty habit. They’re horrible for wildlife (often choking and poisoning fish, animals and birds), they use up finite natural resources, and they take thousands of years to decompose. Skip the “paper or plastic?” discussion at checkout and commit to bringing your own reusable tote to the store instead.

3.Chemical Cleaners

Did you know that the average U.S. household spends an average of $645 on toxic housekeeping supplies each year? Forgo those commercial cleaning products and opt for homemade solutions instead. Worried they won’t be as effective? There’s no need.

4. Dryer Sheets

Wool dryer balls are one of my favorite little green miracles. They cut my dry time by half, reduce static cling and keep my clothing soft without needingtoxic fabric softeners. They’re also easy to make! So skip the dryer sheets, and invest in these instead.

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5. Plastic Straws

Just like other plastic products, plastic straws never biodegrade. And yet, we see them everywhere we go! In restaurants, you’re usually handed one automatically. Can’t bear to sip that smoothie without a straw? Get a glass, bamboo or stainless steel one instead. These materials are sustainable and make straws that canbe cleaned and reused for tens of years to come.

6. Synthetic Sponges

Research shows that kitchen sponges are the dirtiest thing in your kitchen.Give up on that sponge altogether and replace it with a naturally antibacterial, antimicrobial and compostable hemp sponge.

7.Packaged Pantry Staples

Take a second and consider all of the pantry staples you buy on a regular basis. How many of these come in disposable plastic: Sugar? Pasta? Stop buyingthose packaged goods and go withthe more sustainable option: buying in bulk!

8. Plastic Water Bottles

Bottlers of water are living the dream, thanks to our concerns about the safety and taste of municipal water. However, truth be told, a good portion of the bottled water we buy is just glorifiedtap water.Plastic bottles are never sustainable and they leach nasty chemicals (even if they’re BPA-free).

108 comments

Jerome S
Jerome S3 months ago

thanks

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Jim V
Jim V3 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Sarah Hill
Sarah Hill5 months ago

I only use paper towels for a few jobs, picking up nasty messes, absorbing grease out of foods, that kind of thing.

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Jaime J
Jaime J5 months ago

Thank you

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Elizabeth M
.5 months ago

Cheers. :)

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Jim Ven
Jim V5 months ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S5 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Jim V
Jim V6 months ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S6 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Sonia M
Sonia M6 months ago

Thanks for sharing

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