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Breast Cancer: Looking to the Future

Breast Cancer: Looking to the Future

Having navigated the treatment phase, cancer graduates often move into a period of self-reflection. What have I learned about myself and life as a result of this experience? How can I use this learning to create a life of greater well-being, happiness, love, and meaning? How can I approach the future with enthusiasm and optimism?

It is a rare person who has not been or will not be affected by cancer sometime during his or her lifetime. What is this disease telling us? As individuals and as a community, on physical, emotional, and spiritual levels cancer is delivering a message that requires our attention. With over three-quarters of cancers having some relationship to lifestyle or environmental factors, we must look at the choices we are making and reduce our tolerance for toxicity in our lives. What we eat, what we breathe, and what we allow into our soil and water all contribute to our risk for illness. Each of us is individually and collectively responsible for the environment, which according to Ayurveda is our extended body.

On an emotional level, we know that there is an intimate connection between our mind and body. If our inner dialogue is one of stress and discontent, we transmit that message to every cell in the body. Our immune cells are continuously listening to the conversation we are having with ourselves and responding to the task of protecting us from illness with greater or lesser enthusiasm. Learning to communicate consciously and using our five senses to invigorate our inner “pharmacy” are essential keys to enlivening our mind-body connection and fortifying our immunity. Our societal confusion about who is friend and who is enemy is being played out in our personal immune systems. Making the commitment to peace of mind is the most essential step to create peace in our bodies and peace in world.

Spiritually, the message is the perennial reminder that life is delicate and short. Cancer reminds us to live in the present, ensuring that our hearts and minds are free from resentments, regret, and hostility. Underlying the field of thoughts that define our minds and the field of molecules that defines our body is the field of consciousness–of spirit–that while remaining beyond space/time give rise to subjective and objective reality. Rediscovering our essential infinite and eternal nature is the secret to accessing our deepest source of energy, creativity, and healing. Only by tapping into the timeless realm within our own awareness can we experience genuine freedom from the inevitable challenges of time-bound existence.

Use this experience to explore these core questions: What am I carrying with me from the past that is no longer serving me in the present? What have I been resisting or ignoring that will bring greater nourishment into my life? Use the opportunity for facing a serious illness to make the changes you have been putting off. Knowing that life is brief and precious, don’t waste time. Give yourself permission to expand happiness, well-being and love in your life.

David Simon, M.D. is CEO, medical director, author, and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing (www.chopra.com). He is a board-certified neurologist and author of The Ten Commitments: Translating Good Intentions into Great Choices, Vital Energy, Wisdom of Healing, and Return to Wholeness: Embracing Body, Mind, and Spirit in the Face of Cancer. “Return to Wholeness: Envisioning Your Recovery From Cancer” (Pure Potential Media, 2008), a new DVD from Dr. Simon and Dr. Deepak Chopra, is just out. To learn more go to www.cancervisualization.com.

My intent is to overcome Breast Cancer

For more breast cancer articles, go to Intent.com. Intent is a new site providing content and a community for who you aspire to be–personally, socially and globally.

Read more: Health, Cancer, , , , ,

By David Simon, M.D., from Intent

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5:55AM PDT on Jun 18, 2009

Time goes on and things eventually change! The NHS has now sent me to Munich twice and I am well over half way to reconstruction. IT IS TOUGH GOING, and if you want to take the autologous rout for breast reconstruction you have to be so sure this is what you want. I am through the worst, 2 x 8 hour operations to take the fat from my buttock, have my mastectomy scar reopened and the new tissue inserted. Then the hard work begins, I was woken every 2 hours for 10 days, and fully understand why being kept awake is used as a form of torture. For me the hallucinations started on day 3, great fun!?! I had 10 days at home to sleep and flew out for round 2. Although not completed, I am feeling like a woman. I am standing differently, walking differently, head up shoulders back. Don't take this the wrong way but I feel beautiful again. I don't look for the 'not sure' box when asked on forms about my gender. I look terrific! I am so proud that I stuck to my guns and said no implants, no taking skin from my inner ( rather hairy) thigh, to leave me with more disability.

My new breasts will slim or grow naturally with my body weight changes. Last breast was constructed on 1st April and I am having 6 months to recover and for everything to settle, then I am back for nipple construction, tattooing and a bit of liposuction. It has taken a long time but is worth it. I am still exhausted and the scars will take a good year or 2 to turn into smooth while lines. But hey! I feel like me agai

2:48AM PDT on Jun 15, 2009

thanks...
Kabin
Konteyner

9:15AM PDT on Oct 23, 2008

After radiotherapy I was advised to have a bilateral mastectomy, I am left with adhesions between my pectoral muscle and chest wall, left side. I was advised to go on to opiates until this could be solved with reconstructive surgery, 4 years on I have one hell of an opiate habit, unbearable pain and still no reconstructive surgery. I'm alive desperately unhappy, and have no hope of future surgery. Was my treatment worth while, there is a question I cannot answer. It has cost me my marriage, career and I live in social isolation. All under the UK's NHS (No Help Service).

10:23AM PDT on Oct 22, 2008

I opted for a double mastectomy instead of radiation. Two of my sentinel nodes were poitive for cancer. However, instead of putting toxic chemicals into my body, i've opted for concentrated flax hull lignans. Recommended by the Health Sciences Institute, they kill even the deadliest cancers like bone, pancreatic, and lung.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
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