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Canine Intellect

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Canine Intellect

By Claudia Kawczynska, The Bark

The internationally renowned Hungarian scientist Vilmos Csanyi studies canine behavior and intelligence at Etovos Lorand University in Budapest, where he chairs the department of ethology. We had the pleasure of speaking with him about his recent book, If Dogs Could Talk: Exploring the Canine Mind (translated by Richard E. Quandt). Much of his book draws upon his astute observations of his own pet dogs, the delightful Flip and Jerry. He makes a convincing case for special social and emotional bonds between dogs and humans, and for the idea that, by observing the cognitive behavior of dogs, we can also learn much about how the human mind works.

Bark: In your book, If Dogs Could Talk, you write that dogs are excellent human ethologists, what do you mean by that?

Vilmos Csanyi: A family dog constantly observes human behavior and always tries to predict interesting actions in which he could participate. Dogs can learn any tiny signal for the important actions and is always ready to contribute.

B: You also say that dogs can show empathy, especially toward their owners. Are you familiar with any cases in which a dog has been empathic to a species other than humans?

VC: They are also empathic with each other. On one occasion Flip wanted to go out in the middle of night but I slept too deeply and was not awakened by his murmur; Jerry came and started to bark loudly, which instantly made me awake. I believed that Jerry had the problem, but he went back to his sleeping place and Flip was the one who enthusiastically ran to the door to be let out as soon as possible.

B: You write about the similarities between dogs and humans, including that both species seem to have a genetic imperative to follow rules. What evolutionary advantage does this bestow on our two species?

VC: Following rules is a very important human trait, which is shared with dogs to some extent. In animals, behavior in a group is regulated by aggression and rank order. In humans, in-group aggression is very mild and the rank order is of a mixed type. Not only persons but rules also get a place in our rank order. Our behavior is influenced by persons who have authority over us and rules that regulate certain conduct. Even “alpha persons” have to obey rules, which makes human social groups very complex and adaptive.

An important task for a group can be prescribed by rules, and group members do not have to exert any aggression to fulfill the given task, just follow the rules. It is a human-specific trait and the basis of complex human societies. Its importance is shown by the fact that dogs also acquired the rule-following ability. If a dog recognizes a rule created by the master, he follows it. Sometimes the problem is how to explain the given rule to a dog. They are not able to perceive rules above certain complexity.

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Read more: Behavior & Communication, Dogs, Pets

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6:40AM PDT on Nov 4, 2011

great article

12:28PM PDT on Aug 9, 2011

Thank you for the information.

4:00PM PST on Dec 26, 2010

Dogs do pick up signals and body language and they learn. They generally are creatures of habit, so they see things and relate them to what they have done in the past.

3:49PM PDT on Oct 11, 2010

Agree with Agnes. Thank you Megan.

5:20AM PDT on Sep 22, 2010

The very same holds true for most cats.

1:53AM PDT on Jul 15, 2010

thanks for the great read

12:25PM PDT on Jun 6, 2010

You sure post excellent articles Megan.
Love this one a lot

12:54PM PDT on Apr 11, 2010

Thanks :)

12:51PM PDT on Mar 23, 2010

Very cool! I love this because I actually communicate well, with my 8 year old English Boxer. He is very expressive and will say so much with 1) body language, 2) the different ways that he barks, 3) with his eyes. I think his eyes are the most expressive I've ever seen in a dog! He actually understands what I ask of him and when I talk to him (I least I like to think he understands). Again, great article, thanks!

4:55PM PST on Mar 6, 2010

Great article!

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