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Cooking Guide for Whole Grains

Cooking Guide for Whole Grains

Are you looking for easy ways to incorporate more whole foods into your diet? Many people are at least vaguely aware of the nutritional benefits of whole grains, such as B vitamins, fiber and protein, but it can seem intimidating to try out a new food if you have no idea how to prepare it!

But rather than sticking with the familiar, why not try something a little different? The following are simple preparation instructions, but feel free to add seasonings and embellishments if you prefer. Try adding a splash of tamari, a little curry powder, or a single vegan bouillon cube to the water as it’s boiling. Alternatively, you can always add seasonings once it’s cooked.

 

Millet
25 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water. (Some use 3 cups water to 1 cup grain.)
Yields 3 – 3 1/2 cups.

Quinoa
15-20 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water.
Yields 3 – 3 1/2 cups.
Quinoa is fluffy and light.

Brown Rice (long-grain)
40-45 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water.
Yields 3 cups.
Cooks up fluffy with grains remaining separated.

Brown Rice (short/medium grain)
45-50 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water.
Yields 3 cups.
Good for loaves and burgers.

Brown Basmati Rice
30-45 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water.
Yields 3 1/2 cups.
Cooks up fluffy with grains remaining separated.

Wild Rice
40 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 1/2 cups water.
Yields 3 cups.

Cous-Cous (whole wheat)
Approx. 15 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 1 cup water.
Boil water, add cous-cous, simmer for a few minutes then shut off heat. Let stand for several minutes with the lid on, then fluff with a fork. Cover again for another five minutes.

Kasha (buckwheat groats)
20 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water.
Yields 2 cups.

Amaranth
20-25 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 1/2 – 3 cups water.
Yields 3 cups.
Has a slightly nutty flavor and a soft, sticky consistency when cooked. Gluten-free.

Pearled Barley
50-60 minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 2 1/2 cups water.
Yields 3 1/2 cups of cooked grain.
A hearty grain good for soups, stews and cold salads.

Kamut
100+ minutes cooking time.
1 cup dry grain to 3 cups water.
Yields 3 cups.

Bulgur Wheat
Can be reconstituted in boiling water.
1 cup dry grain to 2 cups water.
Yields 2 1/2 – 3 cups.
Cover bowl and let sit for 60 minutes or until water is completely absorbed by grain. Used to make Tabouli.

Read more: Basics, Eating for Health, Food

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Angel Flinn

Angel Flinn is Director of Outreach for Gentle World a non-profit educational organization whose core purpose is to help build a more peaceful society, by educating the public about the reasons for being vegan, the benefits of vegan living, and how to go about making the transition.

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67 comments

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4:30AM PDT on Aug 29, 2014

Make the best use of and treasure what we've got

4:06AM PDT on Aug 29, 2014

I agree with Roxana S. Some of these are a little rough for the digestive system without some kind of soaking. Thank you for the initial information. Now I will be willing to attempt millet and amaranth.

3:46AM PDT on Aug 29, 2014

Thank you :)

5:36AM PDT on Jul 16, 2014

Thanks. I was wondering how to properly cook some of these grains.

8:15PM PDT on Jun 12, 2014

So very true, Rasma R. Kasha is marvellous and flavourful. It is easy to prepare and imparts a delightful aroma as well.

1:51PM PDT on Jun 12, 2014

Thank you :)

5:50AM PDT on Jun 12, 2014

Thanks

2:44AM PDT on Jun 12, 2014

Couscous is actually a tiny rolled pills North African continent form of pasta and takes much less than 15". After water is boiling (& don't prepare a large amt of h2o) add couscous, cover & remove from heat. Fluff w/fork when it has absorbed the h2o. Couscous is great hot or cold and can be jazzed up w/anything from chunks of garlic to bits of sundried tomato to dried apricot bits to almonds. We also expanded our scratch oatmeal to include both rye and barley flakes (available) in bulk bins by scoop.

8:02AM PDT on Jun 3, 2014

Thank you :)

5:36AM PDT on May 31, 2014

What a lot of people don't realize is that kasha or buckwheat is wonderful to have with foods you would normally use rice for. I cook mine not in water but in some chicken or beef bouillon (using a bouillon cube) and once the bouillon is soaked up by the buckwheat it is very tasty. I make a sauteed chicken fillet with vegetables and serve them on buckwheat. The combinations are many.

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