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Creating Spontaneous Flower Arrangements in Your Backyard

Creating Spontaneous Flower Arrangements in Your Backyard

Not long after florist Gayle Nicoletti designed the wedding flowers for Cupcakes and Cashmere’s Emily Schuman last spring, she held a workshop that focused on a more informal theme: how to make bouquets from the things growing in your backyard—or rather, in her backyard.

Ms. Nicoletti invited a group of 20 women to her Mill Valley, CA home the other day for a lesson in creating spontaneous flower arrangements. Here are some of her secrets:

Photographs by Kathleen Harrison.

Above: “Walk around your garden and snip flowers and herbs, and think of the arrangement you’re about to make as a physical representation of that garden—what grows together? What’s tall, and what’s short?” says Ms. Nicoletti. From her garden: scabiosa pods (R), decorative kale (L), and succulents, including her favorite echeveria ‘Metallica’ (“ I love the shape, like a rose, and that color —a hint of pink”).

Above: Ms. Nicoletti with a flat of Sagina subulata (Scotch Moss) that she bought at Green Jeans Garden Supply in Mill Valley; it’s widely available at nurseries. Ms. Nicoletti uses it to completely fill the surface of a planter to create a simple arrangement that looks like a tabletop lawn.

Above: A spool of bind wire, made in France and purchased at the San Francisco Flower Mart. A 70-foot spool of Bark Colored Wire is $8.49 from Afloral. Ms. Nicoletti uses a heavier green wire—such as Paddle Wire ($1.89 per spool from Afloral) to pierce the stem of the succulent; she twists the green wire like a pipe cleaner and attaches it to the viburnum stem.

Above: Dahlias from Ms. Nicoletti’s garden. They’re ‘Jersey’s Beauty,‘ an heirloom dahlia from the 1920s; bulbs are three for $39.50 from Old House Gardens.

Above: The finished bouquet, in a wide-mouthed mason jar, also includes roses, miller, and buddleia from Ms. Nicoletti’s garden. For beginners, Ms. Nicoletti recommends: “Keep it simple: limit yourself to two or three different flowers and two different foliages.”

Also on Gardenista: Small-Scale Gardening in San Francisco.

Read more: Crafts & Design, Crafts & Hobbies, Green Home Decor, Home, Lawns & Gardens, Remodelista, , , , , , ,

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Gardenista

Gardenista is a one-stop sourcebook for cultivated living, a guide to outdoor design and gardening. Helmed by former New York Times columnist Michelle Slatalla, Gardenista features inspiration, garden visits, and advice for all things outdoor living, from patios and peonies, to tables and terraces. Gardens matter, and Gardenista celebrates tomatoes on the fire escape as much as rolling acres of green.

16 comments

+ add your own
9:14AM PDT on Oct 24, 2012

NO "Artificial Food Dyes" belong in any foods...Lets fight to get rid of them!

9:31PM PDT on Oct 6, 2012

Very nice, I love the moss, thanks.

1:46AM PDT on Oct 6, 2012

cool,

6:10AM PDT on Oct 5, 2012

Gracias por compartirlo.

5:11AM PDT on Oct 5, 2012

Thanks for sharing.

2:33AM PDT on Oct 5, 2012

Thanks.

11:24PM PDT on Oct 4, 2012

Thank you, some nice photos here.

10:52PM PDT on Oct 4, 2012

lovely!

9:51PM PDT on Oct 4, 2012

TY

5:08PM PDT on Oct 4, 2012

What a wonderful idea, thanks for sharing.

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