START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

Does the ‘Perfect Age’ Really Exist?

Does the ‘Perfect Age’ Really Exist?

So much for the notion of the mid-life crisis—the ideal age for Americans appears to be 50 years old, according to a recent survey by international research firm, Harris Interactive.

That’s right, though the magic number fluctuated a little, depending on gender, geographic region, and current age, most people would prefer to stop the clock at age 50, provided they were able to maintain good health.

Curiously, this new number is nearly a decade older than people desired to be just ten years ago. Forty-one was the magic number when Harris conducted a similar poll in 2003.

Current age influences desired age

Is there really a “perfect” age? When does one reach that golden number where energy and experience mesh on an optimal level?

The theory is that the old often desire the return of youthful vigor, while the young crave the social standing and overall stability that comes with advancing years.

But, while younger respondents were drawn towards older ages—those in their twenties and early thirties naming 38 the best age—older individuals (those in their late forties to late sixties), cited 55 years as their ideal. Only those 68 and older seemed to want to be younger—67 being their age of choice.

A 61-year plan

Adolescents in high school and college are often encouraged to come up with a “5-Year Plan” to keep them focused and grounded as they endeavor to chart the course of their lives.

The survey also asks respondents to cite at what age they would preferably like to encounter certain life milestones, such as graduating from college, getting married and retiring. The results form a framework for what the ideal 61 year plan would look like:

Graduate from college: 22
Move out of your parents’ house: 20
Get married: 26
Have child number one: 28
Become an empty-nester: 45
Retire: 61

There’s obviously no formula for leading the “perfect” life, but these types of studies lend interesting insight into how our own life stage and experiences influence our perceptions.

What would your ideal age be?

Related
10 Things That Make You Feel Old–And What to Do About Them
The Secret to Successful Aging
3 People Who Are Changing What it Means to Age
The Simple Diet Tweak that May Save Your Brain
5 Ways to Overcome Mid-Life Regret
The Most Common Issues of Aging

Read more: Aging, Healthy Aging, Life, , ,

b>By Anne-Marie Botek, AgingCare.com Editor

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

AgingCare.com

AgingCare.com connects family caregivers and provides support, resources, expert advice and senior housing options for people caring for their elderly parents. AgingCare.com is a trusted resource that visitors rely on every day to find inspiration, make informed decisions, and ease the stress of caregiving.

63 comments

+ add your own
3:16AM PDT on Sep 27, 2013

Thank you :)

2:34AM PDT on Sep 25, 2013

Every age has its good points and bad points. And we don't always appreciate the good points at the time, nor are we always aware of the bad points. Eg, we don't always appreciate the delight of being young with small children when they are keeping us up at night, and we're not always aware that the reason we enjoy sitting watching telly of an evening so much is because we are not as well as we used to be.

Enjoy what's good about the age you are now!

6:17PM PDT on Sep 22, 2013

ideal age i think is 100, by then i hope to cross out that long list! at 61 i;m dating, going to the gym, salsa dancing, jog, learning russian and polish, starting the guitar again! hope to rescue a lot of animals,,,,,,have a laugh!

9:09AM PDT on Sep 22, 2013

excellent question

6:01AM PDT on Sep 22, 2013

Ideal, perfect age? To me, this is a self-defeating mindset. Let Life flow- as many mentioned- NOW is the right time. Life is about facing the challenges, the complications , the changes, the failures and most importantly, the battles in this Life that is won. Savor these moments.
One can have it all before they are in their '30's. There are others who plod along, wearily, in their hearts, hoping, hoping. Some have it all, all along and never appreciated it , oblivious to their blessings.
It does not matter if one is thirty or seventy. Youth does not guarantee perfect health. Old age does not always mean mental and physical incapability. Let the sum total of your Life equate to strength of spirit as the years pile on. Let the experiences, relationships and accomplishments you had bring you a sense of fulfillment. Have a plan in Life and live it to the fullest each day. For tomorrow may never come.

4:27PM PDT on Sep 21, 2013

I find the best age seems to be th one I'm at the time. Each year brings with it good things, more plus than minus.

12:21PM PDT on Sep 21, 2013

I see a lot of "fuddy duddies" at 50 years of age, many work weary people at age 60 appear to have "one foot in the grave" The lucky ones can retire to "God's waiting room" and spend their soulless final years in a state of gloom. The essential way to stay really alive is to keep up your spirit with mental and some physical exercise, cherish friendships and maintain a positive frame of mind.

9:43AM PDT on Sep 20, 2013

This is a very interesting survey. I've always liked the age I'm at. I do like the idea of retiring at 61. Thank you.

7:53AM PDT on Sep 20, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

6:51AM PDT on Sep 20, 2013

thanks for sharing age is but a number and you are only as old as you let your self feel

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

Watch the cat at all times; and if you're busy doing something, or have to go out, put the cat in an…

Thanks. I want healthier lashes, but the new products on the market mention they might change your …

This is disgusting. What on earth is Care2 doing promoting eating turkeys? Have a look at how most t…

CONTACT THE EDITORS



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.