Edamame Bean Spread

Have you ever wondered what to do with the bags of frozen bean pods in your supermarket’s freezer? One bag says “in the pod” and the other contains the shelled beans. Known as Edamame, they are the immature soybean—harvested before it hardens—and have been eaten in Japan for centuries. One cup of cooked Edamame yields 16.9 grams of easily digested protein. These bright green beans are high in fiber and deliver adequate amounts of magnesium, phosphorus, copper and thiamin. The beans in the pod can be boiled in salted water then popped from the shell right into your mouth. A great snack or appetizer, and kids love the flavor. The hulled Edamame beans can be tossed into soup, used in stir-fries, or made into a delicious spread.

Here’s an easy recipe to make, and one that can be used in a variety of ways: as a topping on toasted or steamed bread, as a party dip with crackers, in a wrap with roasted vegetables, over salad greens, or to top an open-faced veggie burger. It’s one of those multifunction recipes that come in handy when you are too busy to fix a big meal.

One word of caution: Make sure to buy organic, non-GMO soybeans when purchasing Edamame, or ask your local Community-Supported Garden to plant them as part of your share. Best to be safe with the food you put into your body, plus what you buy with your money always speaks loudest in the marketplace.

Edamame Bean Spread
Yields 6 cups

  • 2 cups frozen shelled Edamame beans
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 1 shallot
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • Ľ cup Vegenaise
  • Salt to taste
  • Dense whole grain bread
  • ˝ avocado
  • Roasted red pepper
 slices
  • Baby arugula
  • Lemon slices

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil, add the broccoli and simmer for 30 seconds, add the Edamame, cover, turn off heat and let sit for 3 minutes.
2. Drain in a colander and run under water to cool.
3. Place Edamame, broccoli, shallot, soy sauce, salt and Vegenaise in a food processor and pulse to chop to a pâté consistency. You can make it smooth, or leave choppy with small pieces.
4. Set aside or refrigerate to let the flavors meld. When ready, serve on a slice of lightly steamed bread, and top with sliced avocado, sliced red pepper, and baby arugula. Squeeze some lemon over the top and serve.

 

 

Related:
Does Soy Grow on Trees?
The Story of Zucchini Yogurt Soup
Egyptian Edamame Stew

12 comments

Julie W
Julie Wabout a month ago

I do wish writers wouldn't use brand names - as I don't live in the US I have no idea what Veganaise is! I have a recipe for edamame hummus I've been meaning to try, I might try this one too.

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mac C
mac Cabout a month ago

I like the idea of using edamame as a spread, sounds so good. Thank you!

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Sonia Minwer Barakat Requ
Sonia M3 years ago

thanks for sharing

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Karen H.
Karen H3 years ago

Thanks for the great ideas.

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Fred Hoekstra
Fred H4 years ago

Thank you Delia, for Sharing this!

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a             y m.
g d c4 years ago

ty

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J.L. A.
JL A4 years ago

yum

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Teresa Wlosowicz
Teresa W4 years ago

not available in Poland :-(

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Talya Honor
Tal H4 years ago

Thanks for the share!

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Vicky Pitchford
Vicky P4 years ago

thanks

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