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Seafood Production and China’s Global Contribution

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Seafood Production and China’s Global Contribution

Much ink has been spilled in opposition to the practice of raising and consuming meat (cows, pigs, etc), for what it does to the environment as well as our humanity. Raising meat uses so many resources that it’s a challenge to quantify them all. But consider: an estimated 30 percent of the earth’s ice-free land is directly or indirectly involved in livestock production, according to the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization, which also estimates that livestock production generates nearly a fifth of the world’s greenhouse gases — an amount that far exceeds that of transportation.

We have been urged to eat less (most Americans eat on average 8 ounces of meat a day) and consider the lasting impact that industrial meat production has on our planet, our health, and our conscience. But as much as meat production takes an enormous toll on our planet, cows, pigs, and the like are a relatively renewable resource (although not sustainable) whereas the planets reserves of wild fish are rapidly (and I mean rapidly) dwindling. Recent books like Four Fish, by the author Paul Greenberg, outline the lasting damage over-fishing of wild fish stocks and its promised solution aquaculture have had on the planet, and how our appetite for fish and seafood is leading us down a very unsustainable path.

Now comes news from the WorldFish Center and Conservation International (a global think tank on these sorts of global matters) that reveals some pretty disturbing info about the global farmed fish trade. While the report is fairly technical by nature, one look at the below graphic, which reveals where the glut of aquaculture production is happening and clearly illustrates that China is providing the lions share of it.


Image: Courtesy of the WorldFish Center and Conservation International

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Read more: Diet & Nutrition, Eating for Health, Environment, Following Food, Food, , , , , , , , ,

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Eric Steinman

Eric Steinman is a freelance writer based in Rhinebeck, NY. He regularly writes about food, music, art, architecture, and culture and is a regular contributor to Bon Appétit among other publications.

27 comments

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7:40AM PDT on Apr 30, 2012

Thanks for the article.

10:34AM PDT on Jul 12, 2011

Cont...
Your american (there is more than one America) grandparents from hispanic origin, did not know Tilapia because that name didn't even sound in the past. Tilapia is considered the garbage of fish use for food. It is a cheap fish grow in a cheaper way.
Thailand is an emerging country as China .With less money but that can control itself .Ask your government to protect environment,water,oceans,animal and people. And to invest better the money it is making in other ways than fishing.

10:10AM PDT on Jul 12, 2011

JM De Jesus:

US are not permitting or impulsing Chinas growth .US owe China a lot of money.Humongous quantity of money. Is in debt with China .But China is probably the best customer of the US in grains at least.Now China is thinking twice what are they are going to sell and what they are going to buy.They need many products they are selling now (food) and they will produce more in their land and outside for their use. Many countries are permitting China to explode agriculture in their land and are loosing the possibility to grow and sell themselves.Why? because china has money to pay for the utilization of great spaces of soil FOR LESS MONEY THAN IDEAL.And countries accept because they don't have enough money to explode agriculture in such way themselves. Then, they stop producing and selling and China produce and sell or not. They decide.But they had invaded the market. Countries have to defend themselves.NOT WITH ARMS. The only ship you have,you can sink in the sea to see if it can help promote coral growth.And US does not have to go fighting everyone to rescue countries that are not helping themselves.Go to the United Nations and talk seriously.They will listen.But your country is making money in other ways. In reality it is not that poor. Why don't gov impulse economy with that money? Why don't they talk to China and ask for respect? If you say NO, China cannot fish in your waters.Period. The only one permitting this is your country. Ask why...

10:35PM PDT on Jun 24, 2011

The more I learn about Assians, the more I don't like them.

12:42PM PDT on Jun 23, 2011

thanks for sharing!

3:31AM PDT on Jun 23, 2011

Useful info. I don't buy Chinese production.

2:27PM PDT on Jun 22, 2011

Yin/Yang is no longer but Yuck/Yike

8:02AM PDT on Jun 22, 2011

Thanks for the info.

5:10AM PDT on Jun 22, 2011

I am scared about almost anything that comes from china...thanks for the article

11:52PM PDT on Jun 21, 2011

My consumption has reduced since moving to the east coast of Aust. In the west the seafood is amazing, here not so much. So not reduced as a result of what's happening to fish stocks.

We produce some of the best seafood in the world and are working on making the industry more sustainable. We import a lot from Thailand and China where their processes are a tad dodgy and I wouldn't touch any of it with a barge pole! I was spoilt back home up north. I love China btw, an impressive country in many ways, I have nothing against them, just their fish, same with Thailand, lol.. hugs to all my friends there :)

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This sounds really smart to me. I really like that it doesn't cut outright any foods that still hav…

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