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Make Your Own Bat Box

Make Your Own Bat Box

Bats are so threatened by toxic insecticides that they need all the help they can get. A bat box can be made from untreated, preferably rough-sawed timber.

Directions for Making a Bat Box

There is no front entrance hole, but instead a 3/4″ (2 cm.) base entry slit.
Back: 16″ x 6″
Front 5″ x 6″
Side: 8″ x 25 cm
Side: 10″ x 20 cm
Roof: 9″ x 12.5 cm
Base: 3 3/4″ x 4-5 cm

Before fixing the wooden sections together, panel-pin or drill and screw two bat perches against the inside of the back wall. These are made of wood 1/2″ (1.25 cm) square and 4″ (10 cm) long.

The hinge is once again made from a strip of rubber cut from an old wellington boot and tacked on to the roof and back panel, forming a weatherproof joint.

Two hooks and eyes should be used to secure either side of the roof against wind and squirrels. Bats are protected by law, and so although a hinged roof is useful, casual inspections should not be carried out.

Bats prefer to roost high off the ground (think of a church belfry, for instance). So a position about 6 yards high on a wall or tree trunk would be ideal. However, if this is not possible, it is worth experimenting at lower levels. When siting the bat box, avoid facing it due east or west.

Read more: Nature, Natural Pest Control

Adapted from The Blooming Lawn, Creating a Flower Meadow, by Yvette Verner. Copyright (c)1998 by Yvette Verner. Reprinted by permission of Chelsea Green Publishing Company.
Adapted from The Blooming Lawn, Creating a Flower Meadow, by Yvette Verner.

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Annie B. Bond

Annie is a renowned expert in non-toxic and green living. She was named one of the top 20 environmental leaders by Body and Soul Magazine and "the foremost expert on green living." - Body & Soul Magazine, 2009. Learn Annie's latest eco-friendly news on anniebbond.com, a website dedicated to healthy and green living.

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The Blooming Lawn

This helpful book will show you how to create a natural habitat in your own garden, whether large or small, so you too can observe the lifestyles of our native flora and fauna, and play your part in encouraging their survival.buy now

65 comments

+ add your own
3:11PM PDT on Jul 29, 2012

We have bat boxes in our back yard. I enjoy our little bats. The bats help control mosquito and I am told that they also help pollinate certain plants.

7:35PM PDT on Jul 15, 2012

Perfect timing - need to make one of these! :)

8:52AM PDT on Jul 15, 2012

Thanks

5:38AM PDT on Apr 23, 2012

Thanks.

5:12PM PDT on Apr 22, 2012

THANKS FOR THE INFO!

11:01AM PDT on Apr 22, 2012

thanks

12:26AM PST on Nov 26, 2011

Thanks for the article.

10:01AM PDT on Oct 12, 2011

I think the bat box is a great idea - just wish a couple of pictures were added to see how to make it.

2:40PM PDT on Oct 4, 2011

Interesting. I might consider going batty.

6:36AM PDT on Jul 31, 2011

Bats in the city?

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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