Make Your Own Holiday Dried Fruit Garland

This year, Gardenista editor Erin made a dried fruit garland to decorate for the holidays. Here’s how to recreate your own.

In case there’s a historian in the crowd, it should be noted that the history of decorating wreaths and garlands with dried fruit dates from the early 20th century and the height of Colonial Revival, and not from the Colonial period itself. The thought of sacrificing an orange for décor would have been unthinkable to the colonists.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Assorted apples, pears, and oranges
  • Walnuts
  • Upholstery needles
  • Twine
  • Cookie rack
  • Cookie sheet

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 1: Choose a variety of brightly colored apples, pears, and oranges for slicing.

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 2: Slice fruit into 1/4 inch slices, through the center of the fruit. Prepare to sacrifice your first few fruits (make fruit salad from the duds!) because it takes a bit of practice to get a clean cut.

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 3:  Place sliced fruit on a cookie rack on top of a cookie sheet.

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 4: Bake at 150 degrees for from five to six hours. Yes, you read that right. This is a project for a lazy (and chilly) afternoon at home. The next time Erin makes a garland, she might try air drying the fruit (See Justine’s Dried Vegetables to see how).

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 5:  When the fruit is visibly dried, remove from the oven.

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 6: Use an upholstery needle to thread the dried fruit onto thin twine.

Step 7: If you decide to include walnuts or cinnamon sticks, use a hammer to gently tap the top of the needle through the top of the harder surfaces of your nuts and spices.

dried fruit garland for the holidays | gardenista

Step 8: Hang your finished garland in a sunny spot and enjoy all season.

50 comments

Lynn Rubal
Lynn Rubal1 years ago

Thank you.

Fi T.
Fi T.1 years ago

Ways to treasure our natural resources

Elena Poensgen
Elena Poensgen1 years ago

Thank you :)

Elena T.
Elena Poensgen2 years ago

Thank you :)

Jonathan Harper
Jonathan Harper2 years ago

ty

matt gowty
matt gowty2 years ago

I make variations of these all throughout the year mostly out of orange and cinnamon and raffia. They look beautiful hanging from curtain rails and they keep the room smelling delicious. I moved into a house last year that was a bit musky and hung up garlands in every room before I unpacked, by the time I had finished the smell had gone. Smells incredible on warm days.

Carole R.
Carole R.2 years ago

Pretty and unique. Will try it.

Sue H.
Sue H.2 years ago

Looks lovely but I doubt that I wouldn't eat it all before it got to that dried stage.

Kira Polevaya
Kira Polevaya2 years ago

Great thing!
Sorry if the question seems a bit silly but in our country (Belarus) we use Centigrade. I presume here 150 Farenheit is meant. Is it so?

Janis K.
Janis K.2 years ago

Thanks