Natural Remedies for Summer Poison Ivy

For those who spend a lot of time gardening or hiking in the outdoors, stinging nettles, poison oak, poison sumac and poison ivy are well-known foes. Spending†any†time outside, it is almost inevitable that you’ll end up inflamed and itchy at some point. But luckily, there are plenty of natural remedies to ward off the worst of itchiness, many of them easily found in your own home!

Jewelweed

If youíre out in nature and youíve stumbled into a big pile of poison ivy or stinging nettles, jewelweed is something to know about. Jewelweed, when crushed up and rubbed on the affected area, has an†almost miraculous capacity to reduce itching and pain within seconds. And the best part? Jewelweed often grows in the area near poison ivy and stinging nettles. That’s right, nature has your back. Learn to identify†this useful plant and you’ll save yourself a lot of discomfort in the long run.

Soaps and creams

There are plenty of creams, balms and sprays that utilize natural ingredients to soothe skin irritation.†These skin creams†from Jonathan’s Sprouts are designed for conditions like poison ivy or†rosacea and actually include powerful ingredients like jewelweed, comfrey and broccoli sprout extract.†There are also plenty of resources online for Ayurvedic balms†that you can make at home to pack on the trail.

Do not scratch!

I know, I know. Itís almost impossible. The impulse†is unquenchable and constant. But it only makes things worse and so much itchier. You may also be tempted to take a scalding hot shower to soothe the itch. Do not do this either. The heat will open your pores and encourage the rash to spread. You’ll be itchier than ever before. The best thing you can do? Ice it. Ice will provide a soothing, cooling effect on the rash, but it will also reduce inflammation in the area.

Apple cider vinegar

When mixed with water and applied liberally, good ol’ ACV amazes us again. While it won’t get rid of the rash, it can reduce the itching temporarily, which can seem like a godsend if you have no other options.

Oatmeal bath

Remember these from childhood? Draw a tepid bath filled with a few cups of uncooked oatmeal, and maybe some epsom salts. Soak for 10-30 minutes and bask in†the relief. The oat starch eventually dries on to the skin and helps draw liquid out from the inflamed area, providing further relief. That being said, try not to rub the starch off with towels afterwards.

Ayurvedic balms/sprays

If you or a loved one knows anything about Ayurveda, you know there are plenty of powerful combinations†they can provide some relief. Look for a spray with apple cider vinegar, sea salts, and essential oils, like this one.

Perhaps most importantly, educate yourself as to what poison oak, ivy and sumac look like. The best treatment is always prevention. Happy trails!

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72 comments

Aaron F
Past Member 2 months ago

Jewelweed (impatiens capensis) really does work wonders and it conveniently often grows right next to the poison ivy. Great if you out on a hike or far from home...just break off a stem and squeeze the juice on your rash. Instant relief!

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W. C
W. C4 months ago

Thanks.

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William C
William C4 months ago

Thank you.

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Philippa Powers
Philippa Powers4 months ago

Thanks.

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Carl R
Carl R4 months ago

Thanks!!!!

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Ruth S
Ruth S5 months ago

Thanks.

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Jerome S
Jerome S5 months ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S5 months ago

thanks

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Jim V
Jim Ven5 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Jim V
Jim Ven5 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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